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44 Classic TV Commercials (1 Hr + Of Classic Commercials) Part 3/7

Catch a hold of this exciting, nostalgic tv commercials. Not only have commercials changed, but businesses have changed with the breakthroughs of modern technologies. It is quite hilarious to look back at days gone by and view the many products that shaped our lives and the way we lived. ~AmericaOnCoffee (MissBackInTheDayUSA)~

Part 1: http://youtu.be/ozIjeH6E-cQ
Part 2: http://youtu.be/0LKGf_dSIR4
Part 4: http://youtu.be/XvaeIP4dK7U
Part 5: http://youtu.be/FDg8uapxXCw
Part 6: http://youtu.be/Xn8xuqn4-IE
Part 7: http://youtu.be/OHqWzqM88CU

1) BAND-AID
2) BAND-AID
3) GILLETTE BLUE BLADES
4) REMINGTON ELECTRIC SHAVER
5) GILLETTE SUPER-SPEED RAZORS
6) MUM CREME DEODORANT
7) PEPSODENT
8) DODGE
9) CHEVROLET TRUCKS
10)THE RENAULT DAUPHINE
11) CHEVROLET
12) CHEVROLET
13) DELCO DRY CHARGE BATTERY
14) SPEEDWAY “79” POWER FUEL
15) ESSO EXTRA GASOLINE
16) BANK OF AMERICA “Timeplan”
17) LUCKY STRIKE
18) MURIEL cigars
19) KOOL “snow fresh filter” menthol cigarettes
20) MARLBORO cigarettes
21) ROBERT BURNS cigars
22) WINSTON cigarettes
23) AJAX
24) S.O.S. cleaning pads
25) RAID bug killer
26) TIDE laundry detergent”
27) Instant MAXWELL HOUSE coffee
28) TEA — Tea Council, Inc.
29) HAMM’S “The Beer Refreshing”
30) CARLING BLACK LABEL BEER
31) RHEINGOLD Extra Dry Lager Beer
32) BUDWEISER
33) BALLANTINE’S BREWER’S GOLD
34) GALLO GRENACHE ROSE
35) LIPTON Soup
36) RITZ
37) SKIPPY PEANUT BUTTER
38) E-Z POP Popcorn
39) JELL-O New Instant Pudding
40) KROGER Fresh Eggs
41) PET Evaporated Milk
42) MAYPO Oat Cereal
43) ANDERSEN Split Pea, Beef Burger, Cream of Chicken, Old Fashioned Bean Soups
44) JELL-O Gelatin Dessert

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-15T11:45:11+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 15 Oct 2018 11:45:11 +0000 31, in classic television, nostalgic, vintage products, vintage tv commercials

 

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The Ten-Year Lunch; Wits & Legends of the Algonquin Round Table

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The Algonquin Round Table set the standard for literary style and wit beyond its ten-year duration. After World War I, Vanity Fair writers and Algonquin regulars Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley, and Robert E. Sherwood began lunching at The Algonquin. In 1919, they gathered in the Rose Room with some literary friends to welcome back acerbic critic Alexander Woollcott from his service as a war correspondent. It proved so enjoyable that someone suggested it become a daily event. This led to a near-quotidian exchange of ideas, opinions, and often-savage wit that has enriched the world’s literary life. George S. Kaufman, Heywood Broun, and Edna Ferber were also in this august assembly, which strongly influenced writers like F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. Perhaps their greatest contribution, however, was the founding of The New Yorker. “The Ten-Year Lunch,” which won Aviva Slesin an Academy Award in 1987 for best documentary, offers a vivid introduction to the Round Table and its unparalleled wit.youtube.com

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-15T11:25:45+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 15 Oct 2018 11:25:45 +0000 31, in #brunch, breakfast, food, nostalgic

 

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VANILLA CINNAMON BUTTERMILK PANCAKES

author: THE CHUNKY CHEF

4 SERVINGS
prep time 10 MINS
cook time 5 MINS
total time 15 MINS

The softest, fluffiest, best buttermilk pancakes… from scratch! Savor the sweet hints of vanilla and warmth of the cinnamon; the perfect breakfast!
calories: 319 KCAL

INGREDIENTS
2 cups all-purpose flour
3 Tbsp white sugar
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
2 cups buttermilk
1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 egg
1/4 cup melted butter

INSTRUCTIONS
Melt the butter and set aside to cool down slightly.
To a mixing bowl, add the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Use a whisk to combine all dry ingredients well.
In a separate bowl, combine buttermilk, vanilla, ground cinnamon and egg. Whisk to combine. Add melted butter and whisk again.
Slowly pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, whisking and stirring to mix it all together. Once it’s combined, stop mixing. If you over-mix, your pancakes won’t be light and fluffy.

Set pancake batter aside and heat up a large skillet or griddle over MED-LOW heat. Add a bit of butter to the preheated griddle and spread it out.
Use a 1/4 or 1/3 cup measuring cup to scoop the pancake batter onto the griddle or skillet. Slowly pour it onto the surface, circling outwards to make a nice circle.

Let the pancake cook about 2-3 minutes. You’ll notice bubbles popping up on the surface of the pancake, if the edges look set, carefully flip the pancake over. Cook another 2 minutes on the other side.
Remove to a plate and cover with a kitchen towel. Alternatively, you can place the pancakes on a baking sheet and keep it in a low heat oven (175-200 degrees), until you’re ready to serve.

RECIPE NOTES
1. Please note that the amount of flour may vary, as things such as humidity, brand of flour and the way you measure your flour will effect how things turn out. For reference, I use Gold Medal all purpose flour and measure it by spooning it into my measuring cup, then leveling off with the back of a butter knife.
2. A dash of nutmeg is also a great addition to these pancakes.
3. Feel free to adjust the amount of vanilla and cinnamon to your liking.
4. If you leave out the vanilla and cinnamon, you have a great basic buttermilk pancake recipe.
** This recipe makes enough for 4 people, so feel free to double to feed more people or to freeze some.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-15T11:00:57+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 15 Oct 2018 11:00:57 +0000 31, in nostalgic, breakfast

 

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American Phrases

American Phrases

I love this post because it is most original and brings to mind many traditional, American phrases as:

“The cat has got your tongue.”
(Meaning – you are so quiet and speechless, some feline must have taken your tongue.)

“Hold your horses!”
(Meaning- be patient, or to wait.)

“Pick on somebody your own size.”
(Stop bullying.)

“Don’t let the cat out of the bag.”
(Keep what has been told a secret.)

“Put your money where your mouth is.”
(Fully prove it.)

“pick up your feet.”
(Stop dragging your feet on the ground/floor.)

Do you have any American sayings/ phrases to share? Comment them here, jog our memories, make us laugh.

(please view the original post)

dFluent

  1. Act your age!Behave more maturely! (a rebuke for someone who is acting childish. Often said to a child who is acting like an even younger child.)
    Jonny was squirming around and pinching his sister. His mother finally said, “Jonny, act your age!”
    Child: Aw, come on! Let me see your book! Mary: Be quiet and act your age. Don’t be such a boy.
  2. After while(, crocodile)Good-bye till later; See you later. (The word crocodile is used only for the sake of the rhyme. It is the response to See you later, alligator.) 
    Mary: See you later. Bill: After while, crocodile.
  3. Age before beautya comical and slightly rude way of encouraging someone to go ahead of oneself; a comical, teasing, and slightly grudging way of indicating that someone else should or can go first. 
    As they approached the door, Bob laughed and said to Bill, “Age…

View original post 1,122 more words

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-15T10:00:19+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 15 Oct 2018 10:00:19 +0000 31, in nostalgic

 

“Kansas City-Wilbert Harrison-1959”

image

“Kansas City”

is a rhythm and blues song written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller in 1952.[1] First recorded by Little Willie Littlefield the same year, the song later became a #1 hit when it was recorded by Wilbert Harrison in 1959. “Kansas City” became one of Leiber and Stoller’s “most recorded tunes, with more than three hundred versions,”[2] with several appearing in the R&B and pop record charts.

Original song

“Kansas City” was written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, two nineteen-year-old rhythm and blues fans from Los Angeles, who had their first success writing Charles Brown’s #7 R&B chart hit “Hard Times”. Neither had been to Kansas City, but were inspired by Big Joe Turner records.[3]

I’m goin’ to Kansas City, Kansas City here I come (2x)
They got a crazy way of lovin’ there, and I’m gonna get me some
I’m gonna be standing on the corner, of Twelfth Street and Vine (2x)
With my Kansas City baby, and a bottle of Kansas City wine…
Through a connection to producer Ralph Bass, they wrote “Kansas City” specifically for West Coast blues/R&B artist Little Willie Littlefield.[2] There was an initial disagreement between the two writers over the song’s melody: Leiber (who wrote the lyrics) preferred a traditional blues song, while Stoller wanted a more distinctive vocal line; Stoller ultimately prevailed. They taught the song to Littlefield at Maxwell Davis’ house, who arranged and provided the tenor sax for the song.[2] Littlefield recorded the song in Los Angeles in 1952, during his first recording session for Federal Records, a King Records subsidiary. Federal’s Ralph Bass changed the title to “K. C. Lovin'”,[4] which he reportedly considered to sound “hipper” than “Kansas City”. Littlefield’s record had some success in parts of the U.S., but it did not reach the national chart.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-15T10:00:18+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 15 Oct 2018 10:00:18 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, nostalgic, r&b, vintage music

 

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MEATLOAF Recipe, A Family Secret

Meatloaf recipes are as varied as the cooks who make them. My Aunt Evelyn’s version is easy to make, delicious, and laced with shredded cheese. She would often vary the type of cheese used. Her favorite was cheddar, mine was pepper jack, my Uncle Victor liked swiss, but other cheeses or cheese combinations often appeared and made for subtle and tasty differences.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 1/2 pounds ground chuck
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon Fresh ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup dried bread crumbs
  • 1/2 cup rolled oats, ; uncooked (quick or old-fashioned)
  • 1/4 cup ketchup
  • 1/2 medium onion, ; finely chopped (or, 1-2 tsp onion flakes)
  • 1/2 medium bell pepper, ; finely chopped (optional)
  • 1 cup grated cheese ; (use your favorite)
  • 1 large egg, ; lightly beaten
  • 1/3 cup milk

TOPPING

  • 1/4 cup ketchup
  • 1/4 cup BBQ sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Cider vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar

6 Servings

INSTRUCTIONS
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a shallow 9- by 13-inch baking pan with foil or parchment paper.

Combine all meatloaf ingredients in large bowl and mix lightly until thoroughly combined. Place mixture in middle of prepared baking pan and form into a 9- by 5-inch oval loaf. Make an indentation along top center of loaf. In a small bowl, whisk together all topping ingredients until well combined. Cover meatloaf completely with topping. Bake, uncovered, for about 1 to 1 1/4 hours or until meat is no longer pink and reads 160 degrees F on a thermometer. Let stand for 15 minutes before slicing.

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

For two people: Mix whole recipe, divide and shape into 2 mini loaves. Cover one loaf with topping and bake for about 45 minutes. Freeze second loaf. When ready to use, thaw loaf and cover with topping just before baking.

NOTES
For a more tender and juicier loaf, you can briefly soak the bread crumbs and oats in the milk before adding.
Do not over-knead the mixture or texture will be lost. Mix just enough to combine the ingredients


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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-08T15:01:43+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 08 Oct 2018 15:01:43 +0000 31, in #brunch, food, nostalgic

 

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Homemade New England Style Clam Chowder

Ingredients

  • 4 slices bacon, diced
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped onion
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 4 cups peeled and cubed potatoes
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • ground black pepper to taste
  • 3 cups half-and-half
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 2 (10 ounce) cans minced clams

Add all ingredients to list

Directions

Prep: 15 m
Cook: 30 m
Ready In: 45 m

Place diced bacon in large stock pot over medium-high heat. Cook until almost crisp; add onions, and cook 5 minutes. Stir in water and potatoes, and season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, and cook uncovered for 15 minutes, or until potatoes are fork tender.
Pour in half-and-half, and add butter. Drain clams, reserving clam liquid; stir clams and 1/2 of the clam liquid into the soup. Cook for about 5 minutes, or until heated through. Do not allow to boil.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-08T14:46:49+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 08 Oct 2018 14:46:49 +0000 31, in #brunch, nostalgic

 

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