RSS

The Evolution Of The Necktie…   An Elaborate History 

The Evolution Of The Necktie…   An Elaborate History 

When and why did men start wearing ties? What is the point of them?


The Guardian›notesandqueries›query

They are uncomfortable and they dangle in your soup.  

Justin Rigden, Adelaide Australia


  • Anthropologists would argue that the tie directs a viewer’s attention downwards to the wearer’s genitals (hence the arrow-like shape). A kind of displaced cod-piece.

    Elster, London

  • But they are men’s chance to have a little color with dark suits and white shirts.

    Freda Sedgwick, California USA

  • I’ve heard it argued (predictably enough, given that it’s a men-only item of clothing we’re talking about here) that it’s some kind of male virility thing. Apart from the somewhat phallic shape (if you stretch the imagination a little), a tie also forms a neat arrow – often in a bright colour that contrasts vividly with the typical dark suit / pale shirt combo – pointing directly at a man’s genital area. Quite apart from that, it’s also the only item of male business attire that you can have any fun with at all. Women get to wear all sorts of lovely, bright colours, but try wearing a lime green suit and black shirt to the office and you’ll just end up looking like some dodgy nightclub owner.

    Alistair, Mexico City, 

  • Source:The Guardian›notesandqueries›query

Have you ever wondered why men wear ties ? Did you ever ask yourself how this style trend evolved? After all, the necktie is purely a decorative accessory. It doesn’t keep us warm or dry, and certainly does not add comfort. Yet men all around the world, myself included, love wearing them. To help you understand the history and evolution of the necktie I decided to write this post.

The Origin of the Necktie


Most sartorialists agree that the necktie originated in the 17th century, during the 30 year war in France. King Louis XIII hired Croatian mercenaries (see picture above) who wore a piece of cloth around their neck as part of their uniform. While these early neckties did serve a function (tying the top of their jackets that is), they also had quite a decorative effect – a look that King Louis was quite fond of. In fact, he liked it so much that he made these ties a mandatory accessory for Royal gatherings, and – to honor the Croatian soldiers – he gave this clothing piece the name “La Cravate” – the name for necktie in French to this day.

The Evolution of Modern Necktie

The early cravats of the 17th century have little resemblance to today’s necktie, yet it was a style that stayed popular throughout Europe for over 200 years. The tie as we know it today did not emerge until the 1920s but since then has undergone many (often subtle) changes. Because lots of change has happened to the design of the tie in the past century I decided to break this down by each decade:

  • 1900-1909:
    The tie was a must-have clothing accessories for men in the first decade of the 20th century. Most common were Cravats which evolved from the early 17th century ties that were brought to France by the Croatians. What was different however, was how they were tied. Two decades earlier, the Four in Hand knot had been invented which was the only knot used for cravats. While other tie knots have been invented since, the Four in Hand is still one of the most popular tie knots today. The two other common neckwear styles popular at the time were bow ties (used for evening white tie attire), as well as ascots (required for formal day time dress in England)

  • .1910-1919
     The second decade of the 20th century saw a decline in formal cravats and ascots as men’s fashion became more casual with haberdashers putting a stronger emphasis on comfort, functionality, and fit. Towards the end of this decade neckties closely resemble the ties as we know them.

  • 1920-1929
    The 1920s were an important decade for men’s ties. A NY tie maker by the name of Jessie Langsdorf invented a new way of cutting the fabric when constructing a tie, which allowed the tie to spring back into its original shape after each wearing. This invention triggered the creation of many new tie knots.
    Neckties became the predominant choice for men as bow ties were reserved for formal evening and black tie functions. Furthermore, for the first time, repp-stripe and British regimental ties emerged.
1920s men's silk ties in color. Learn the history at Vintagedancer.com

vintagedancer.com

  • 1930-1939
    During the Art Deco movement of the 1930s, neckties became wider and often displayed bold Art Deco patterns and designs. Men also wore their ties a bit shorter and commonly tied them with a Windsor knot – a tie knot that the Duke of Windsor invented during this time.

Google.com

  • 1940-1949
    The early part of the 1940s didn’t offer any exciting change in the world of men’s ties – possibly an effect of WWII which had people worry about more important things than clothing and fashion. When WWII ended in 1945 however, a feeling of liberation became evident in design and fashion. Colors on ties became bold, patterns stood out, and one retailer by the name of Grover Chain Shirt Shop even created a necktie collection displaying sparsely dressed women.
  • 1950-1959
    When talking about ties, the 50s are most famous for the emergence of the skinny tie – a style designed to compliment the more form fitting and tailored clothes of the time. Additionally tie makers started experimenting with different materials.

thepeoplehistory.com

  • 1960-1969
    Just as ties were put on a diet in the 50s, the 1960s went to the other extreme – creating some of the widest neckties ever. Ties as wide as 6 inches were not uncommon – a style that got the name “Kipper Tie”

Pinterest

  • 1970-1979
    The disco movement of the 1970s truly embraced the ultra wide “Kipper Tie”. But also worth noting is the creation of the Bolo Tie (aka Western Tie) which became Arizona’s official state neckwear in 1971.

Pinterest

  • 1980-1989
    The 1980s are certainly not known for great fashion. Instead of embracing a certain style, tie makers created any kind of neck-wear style during this period. Ultra-wide “Kipper Ties” were still present to some degree as was the re-emergence of the skinny tie which was often made from leather.

microvision.com

  • 1990-1999
    By 1990 the style Faux Pas of the 80s slowly faded away. Neckties became a bit more uniform in width (3.75-4 inches). Most popular were bold floral and paisley patterns – a style that has recently resurfaced as a popular print on modern ties today.

  • 2000-2009
    Compared the the decade before ties became a bit thinner at about 3.5-3.75 inches. European designers further shrunk the width and eventually the skinny tie re-emerged as a popular stylish accessory.

    • 2010 – 2013
      Today, ties are available in many widths, cuts, fabrics, and patterns. It is all about choice and allowing the modern man to express his own personal style. The standard width for ties is still in the 3.25-3.5 inch range, but to fill the gap to the skinny tie (1.5-2.5″), many designers now offer narrow ties that are about 2.75-3 inches wide. Besides the width, unique fabrics, weaves, and patterns emerged. Knitted ties became popular in 2011 and 2012 saw a strong trend of bold florals and paisleys – something that continued throughout 2013.

        

    http://www.ties.com

    Hendrik
    Tie Aficionado & Founder of Tie-a-Tie.net

    http://www.tie-a-tie.net/

        

    Compared the the decade before ties became a bit thinner at about 3.5-3.75 inches. European designers further shrunk the width and eventually the skinny tie re-emerged as a popular stylish accessory.



    Advertisements
     
    1 Comment

    Posted by on April 26, 2018 in nostalgic

     

    STUMP THE STARS GAME SHOW 1963

    STUMP THE STARS GAME SHOW 1963

    wp-1474797623830.jpeg

    Initially titled Pantomime Quiz Time and later Stump the Stars, is an American television game show produced and hosted by Mike Stokey. Running from 1947—1959, it has the distinction of being one of the few television series—along with The Arthur Murray Party; Down You Go; The Ernie Kovacs Show, The Original Amateur Hour; and Tom Corbett, Space Cadet — to air on all four TV networks in the US during the Golden Age of Television.

    Overview

    Based on the parlor game of Charades, Pantomime Quiz was first broadcast locally in Los Angeles from November 13, 1947 to 1949. In that format, it won an Emmy Award for “Most Popular Television Program” at the first Emmy Awards ceremony. The competition involved two teams of four contestants each (three regulars and one guest). In each round, one member acts out (in mime) a phrase or a name while the other three try to guess it. Each team had five rounds (in some broadcasts there were only four); the team that took the less amount of time to guess all phrases won the game.

    Home viewers were encouraged to send in suggestions for phrases to be used in a telecast. Those that were actually used earned cash or a prize for the people who sent them. A bonus was given if the team trying to solve it could not do so within two minutes.

    Broadcast history (national)

    In June 1949, Pantomime Quiz became the “first locally [Hollywood] originated show to be aired in New York via kine recordings.”[1] The broadcasts over WCBS-TV were sponsored by Chevrolet dealers “beginning early in September for a price of about $1,200 weekly.”[1]

    The program was picked up by CBS Television in October 1949 and ran on that network, usually during the summers, until August 28, 1951. After this, NBC Television took it as a mid-season replacement from January 2 to March 26, 1952. CBS then took back the series from July 4 to August 28, 1952. NBC never aired the program again.[2]

    The DuMont Television Network took the series from October 20, 1953, to April 13, 1954, after which it went back to CBS from July 9 to August 27, 1954.[2]

    ABC finally took the charades game for a mid-season slot much like NBC, airing the durable quiz from January 22 to March 6, 1955. After CBS took it back they ran it for three more summers (July 8 to September 30, 1955; July 6 to September 7, 1956; July 5 to September 6, 1957) before the network dropped the program altogether.[2]

    After a seven-month absence, ABC picked up Pantomime Quiz from April 8, 1958, to September 2, 1958; on May 18, 1959 the show began airing on ABC in daytime and concurrently with a primetime show beginning on June 8. However, September 28 saw the end of the primetime version, with the daytime version ending October 9, 1959.[2]

    An Australian version aired in 1957 on Melbourne station GTV-9 and Sydney station ATN-7, with Harry Dearth, George Foster and Jim Russell among those appearing,[3] but proved to be short-lived, running from March to November.

    en.m.wikipedia.org

     
    4 Comments

    Posted by on April 26, 2018 in nostalgic

     

     “Old Falstaff Beer Commercial” 

     “Old Falstaff Beer Commercial” 


    The Falstaff Brewing Corporation was a major American brewery located in St. LouisMissouri. With roots in the 1838 Lemp Brewery of St. Louis, the company was renamed after the Shakespearean character Sir John Falstaff in 1903. Production peaked in 1965 with 7,010,218 barrels brewed, and then dropped 70% in the next 10 years.[1]While its smaller labels linger on today, its main label Falstaff Beer went out of production in 2005.[2] The rights to the brand are currently owned by Pabst Brewing Company.

    HistoryEdit

    Doorway of the former Falstaff Brewery building in New Orleans with the “Falstaff” name and logo, as well as post-Hurricane Katrina floodlines

    Falstaff Brewing’s earliest form was as the Lemp Brewery, founded in 1840 in St. Louis by German immigrant Johann Adam Lemp (1798-1862). Over the next 80 years, the Lemp family was devastated by personal tragedies as it built its beer empire over the caves of St. Louis. It adopted its famous “Blue Ribbon” moniker quickly, as an 1898 trial proved when it took the Storz Brewing Company of Omaha to court for tying blue ribbons on its bottles, and won.[3]The Lemp Brewery company closed in 1921, and sold its Falstaff brand to the then-named Griesedieck Beverage Company. Griesedieck Beverage was renamed the Falstaff Corporation and survived Prohibition by selling near beersoft drinks, and cured hams under the Falstaff name.[4][5] Falstaff Brewing was a publicly traded company on the New York Stock Exchange, which was rare for a brewing industry in which families closely guarded their ownership.[5]o

    When Prohibition was repealed in 1933, the first two cases of beer to be made by the brewery were airlifted from nearby Curtiss Stienberg Airport to the governors of Illinois and Missouri.[6]After Prohibition, the company expanded greatly. Its first acquisition was the 1936 purchase of the Krug Brewery in Omaha, which made Falstaff the first brewery to operate plants in two different states.[2] Other facilities bought in this period included the National Brewery of New Orleans in 1937, the Berghoff Brewing Company of Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1954, the Galveston-Houston Brewing Company of Galveston, Texas, in 1956, and the Mitchell Brewing Company of El Paso in 1956.[4]

    The Falstaff Brewery located in the north side of St. Louis.

    Falstaff was the third-largest brewer in America by the 1960s, with several plants across the country. The 1965 acquisition of another company, the Narragansett Brewing Company of Rhode Island, proved disastrous, with the state government of Rhode Island pursuing an antitrust case against them. The Supreme Court found in Falstaff’s favor in United States v. Falstaff Brewing Corp. (1973),[7] but the company never recovered.

    Fortunes declined throughout the 1970s as consolidation swept the beer industry, and the company was bought in April 1975 by the S&P Company, owned by Paul Kalmanovitz. In the interim, Chicago White Sox announcer Harry Caray endorsed the brew in live TV commercials, many times with a glass of beer in his hand and sipping it. Kalmanovitz also owns General Brewing, PabstPearlOlympia, and Stroh’s.[4]That year, the company ranked 11th in sales nationally,[5] and the original St. Louis plant was closed. Subsequent closures included New Orleans in 1979, Cranston and Galveston in 1981, and Omaha in 1983.[8] After the 1990 closing of the last Falstaff brewery in Fort Wayne, the brand name became a licensed property of Pabst, which continued to produce Falstaff Beer through other breweries. Having sold only 1468 barrels of the brand during 2004, Pabst discontinued production of the Falstaff label in May 2005.[9][10]

    en.m.wikipedia.org


    https://youtu.be/wrScZdC1yn0

     

    Tags:

    “DREAM A LITTLE DREAM OF ME – Doris Day … includes Rosemary Clooney, Joni James and Mama Cass Elliot versions”

    hqdefault.jpgdorisday

    “Dream a Little Dream of Me” was recorded by Ozzie Nelson and his Orchestra, with vocal by Nelson, on February 16, 1931 for Brunswick Records. Two days later, Wayne King and His Orchestra, with vocal by Ernie Birchill, recorded the song for Victor Records. “Dream a Little Dream of Me” was also an early signature tune of Kate Smith. In the summer of 1950, seven recordings of “Dream a Little Dream of Me” were in release, with the versions by Frankie Laine and Jack Owens reaching the US Top 20 at respectively #18 and #14: the other versions were by Cathy Mastice, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Jordan, Vaughn Monroe, Dinah Shore and a duet version by Bing Crosby and Georgia Gibbs. Other traditional pop acts to record “Dream a Little Dream of Me” include Louis Armstrong, Barbara Carroll, Nat King Cole, Doris Day, Joni James, and Dean Martin.

    The song was again recorded in 1968 by Mama Cass Elliot with The Mamas & the Papas, and then by Anita Harris. More than 40 other versions followed, including by the Mills Brothers, Sylvie Vartan, Henry Mancini, The Beautiful South, Anne Murray, Erasure, Michael Bublé, and Italian vocal group Blue Penguin (see below: List of recorded versions).

    en.m.Wikipedia.org

     

    Tags:

    “What’s Easy for Two Is Hard for One” – Mary Wells

    “What’s Easy for Two Is Hard for One” – Mary Wells

    What’s Easy for Two Is Hard for One” (also known as “What’s Easy for Two Is So Hard for One“) is a song written and produced by Smokey Robinson and released as a single by singer Mary Wells for the Motown label.

    Song information

    In this song, the narrator is longing for a longtime partnership with a suitor and constantly begs the man to “take her to the preacher man” in hopes the couple does “what should be done” because “what two can easily do is so hard to be done by one”.

    Release and reaction

    Released in mid-1963, the song returned Wells to the top 30 where it peaked at number 29 on the Billboard Hot 100 (and #8 R&B). Wells covered the song at least two more times

     
    Leave a comment

    Posted by on April 24, 2018 in 1960s, female vocalists, r&b

     

    Tags:

    MOVE OVER DARLING STARRING DORIS DAY AND JAMES GARNER

    image

    Move Over, Darling is a 1963 comedy film starring Doris Day, James Garner, and Polly Bergen and directed by Michael Gordon. The picture was a remake of a 1940 screwball comedy film, My Favorite Wife, with Irene Dunne, Cary Grant and Gail Patrick. In between these movies, an unfinished version entitled Something’s Got to Give began shooting in 1962, directed by George Cukor and starring Marilyn Monroe (who was fired and died soon after) and Dean Martin.

    The film was chosen as the 1964 Royal Film Performance and had its UK premiere on 24 February 1964 at the Odeon Leicester Square in the presence of H.R.H. Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

    Plot
    Ellen Wagstaff Arden (Doris Day), a mother of two young girls named Jenny and Didi, was believed to be lost at sea following an airplane accident. Her husband, Nick Arden (James Garner), was one of the survivors.

    image

    After five years of searching for her, he decides to move on with his life by having her declared legally dead so he can marry Bianca (Polly Bergen), all on the same day. However, Ellen is alive; she is rescued and returns home that particular day. At first crestfallen, she is relieved to discover from her mother-in-law Grace (Thelma Ritter) that her (ex-) husband’s honeymoon has not started yet.

    When Nick is confronted by Ellen, he eventually clears things up with Bianca, but he then learns that the entire time Ellen was stranded on the island she was there with another man, the handsome, athletic Stephen Burkett (Chuck Connors) – and that they called each other “Adam” and “Eve.”

    Nick’s mother has him arrested for bigamy and all parties appear before the same judge that married Nick and Bianca earlier that day. Bianca and Ellen request divorces before the judge sends them all away. Bianca leaves Nick, while Ellen storms out, still married to Nick, declared alive again. Ellen returns to Nick’s house unsure if her children will recognize her. Her children welcome her home, and so does Nick.

    en.m.Wikipedia.org

     
     

    Tags:

    Helms Bakery

    Helms Bakery

    The Helms Bakery in Culver City, California was a notable industrial bakery of Southern California that operated from 1931 to 1969.

    HistoryEdit

    Early historyEdit

    In 1926, Paul Helms of New York took an early retirement for health reasons and moved his family to Southern California and its mild climate. Helms started construction on a building between Washington and Venice Boulevards in 1930 and, on March 2, 1931, the Helms Bakery opened with 32 employees and 11 delivery coaches (trucks).

    By the next year, the Helms Bakery had become the “official baker” of the 1932 Summer Olympics when Paul Helms won a contract to supply bread for the 1932 games in Los Angeles. His slogan was “Olympic Games Bakers – Choice of Olympic Champions.”[1] Four years later in time for the 1936 Summer Olympics Germany asked Helms for his bread recipes to feed to the German Olympic team. His relationship with Olympians continued in later years, the U.S. teams at London and Helsinki requested his bread be served.[2] Early Helms vehicles sported the Olympic symbol, and it also appeared on, and was mentioned in, the Helms logo on the bread wrappers,[3] the company logo and sign.[4]

    Expansion and new bakery in MontebelloEdit

    Helms delivery truck circa 1950 located at the LeMay Car museum in Tacoma, WA

    Helms delivery truck circa 1950 located at the LeMay Car museum in Tacoma, WA

    Despite never being sold in stores, Helms baked products soon became known to millions of consumers. The Helms motto was “Daily at Your Door” and every weekday morning, from both the Culver City facility and a second Helms Bakery site in Montebello, dozens of Helms coaches,[5] painted in a unique two-tone scheme, would leave the bakery for various parts of the Los Angeles Basin, some going as far as the eastern San Gabriel Valley. This is remarkable because the network of freeways had not yet been built, so the trip might take an hour or more. One of these coaches is on display at the Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles,[6]Lyon Air Museum, in Santa Ana, and the LeMay Car Museum in Tacoma Washington.

    Each coach would travel through its assigned neighborhoods, with the driver periodically pulling (twice) on a large handle which sounded a distinctive whistle or stop at a house where a Helms sign, a blue placard with an “H” on it, was displayed in their windows.[7]Customers would come out and wave the coach down, or sometimes chase the coaches to adjacent streets. Wooden drawers in the back of the coach were stocked with fresh donuts, cookies, pastries and candies, while the center section carried dozens of loaves of freshly baked bread. Products often reached the buyers still warm from the oven. Helms Bakery coaches were manufactured by Divco, an example of which may be found at the Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles. Helms’ Divco coaches were powered by various engines, including motors purchased from Nash and Studebaker.[citation needed]

    Paul Helms died on January 5, 1957 at age 67, but the business continued to operate, run by family members. Its delivery network gradually grew to include Fresno to the north; San Bernardino to the east, and south to Orange County and San Diego. In the company’s final year of operation, a clever marketing campaign netted Helms a contract to furnish “the first bread on the moon,” via the Apollo 11 space mission. The San Bernardino facility was located on the northeast corner of Mt Vernon Avenue and Birch Street. After Helm Bakeries closed that location, it was taken over as a small warehouse by FEDCO Corporation, which has since gone out of business as well. The building in San Bernardino is still there, housing a mattress and home furnishings business.

    Although popular, the Helms method of neighborhood delivery was doomed both by the expense of sending their coaches hundreds of miles each week and by the advent of the supermarket, which stocked products from other (less expensive) bakeries, which delivered once or twice each week. The Helms company ceased operations in 1969.

    Purchase by Marks familyEdit

    The Marks Family purchased Helms Bakery in the early 1970s and since then, they have transformed and completed a rare feat in Los Angeles – successful adaptive reuse of a historic structure. Covering the 11 acres, the many improvements include restoring original neon signs on the roofs, creating two historic murals, installing two large Photovoltaic solar arrays, restoring the Zigzag Moderne detailing, reinventing retail, home furnishings and eateries, as well as creating a home for top-flight media and arts related companies. To honor the history of the Bakery, a small museum was installed inside one of the retail stores.

    The closure of Helms Avenue to through traffic created a new pedestrian plaza giving the neighborhood a much deserved community space, Helms Walk. The closed portion of Helms Avenue has been developed with trees, lawn areas, a water feature, free Wi-Fi, music and basalt pavers creating a new found space – a meeting place to sip coffee, chat with an old friend or simply “remember the day”. Helms Bakery’s most recent addition closest to the Culver City station on the Expo Line is the newly created Helms Design Center. Featuring five to-the-trade contract showrooms with well-known brands such as Vitra and Carl Hansen & Søn, the center is a destination for commercial architects and designers. Lastly, a 200-car automated parking structure has been constructed, a first for Culver City, and in its making the Bakery continues to be a leader in civic mindedness with an eye to technological advances and innovations to the built environment and urban fabric.

    en.m.wikipedia.org

     “Baby Boomers Tribute “Daily at Your Door” The Helms Bakery Truck 1930’s thru the early 1960’s Los Angeles”  


     
    3 Comments

    Posted by on April 23, 2018 in culture, historic

     

    Tags:

     
    %d bloggers like this: