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 “Best Ever To Tell The Truth Feb 18 1963 Surprise Ending” 

To Tell the Truth is an American television panel game show created by Bob Stewart and produced by Goodson-Todman Productions that has aired in various forms since 1956 both on networks and in syndication. As of June 14, 2016, the show is one of two game shows in the United States to have aired at least one new episode in at least seven consecutive decades, the other game show being both incarnations of The Price Is Right. As of the 2016 version, a total of 26 seasons of the various versions of To Tell the Truth have been produced, surpassing the 25 of What’s My Line? and the 20 of I’ve Got a Secret.

The show features a panel of four celebrities whose object is the correct identification of a described contestant who has an unusual occupation or has undergone an unusual experience. This “central character” is accompanied by two impostors who pretend to be the central character; together, the three persons are said to belong to a “team of challengers.” The celebrity panelists question the three contestants; the impostors are allowed to lie, but the central character is sworn “to tell the truth.” After questioning, the panel attempts to identify which of the three challengers is telling the truth.


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Posted by on February 25, 2017 in nostalgic, vintage tv shows

 

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“1963 Chevrolet Commercial, WHEN CARS WERE AMERICAN MADE.”

“1963 Chevrolet Commercial, WHEN CARS WERE AMERICAN MADE.”

Imagine… the 1960s automobiles. America manufactured its own vehicles and used its own resources for gas fuels.  Travel was easy, inexpensive and fun. Life was simple, families were wholesome and so were American conveniences.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axM3yYEES64&feature=youtube_gdata_player

 
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Posted by on February 25, 2017 in 1960s, vintage tv commercials

 

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 “The Untouchables – 1959 – TV Series – ABC” 

Genre Crime drama

Starring Robert Stack

Abel Fernandez

Nicholas Georgiade

Paul Picerni

Steve London

Bruce Gordon

Neville Brand

Narrated by Walter Winchell

Theme music composer Nelson Riddle

Composer(s) Bill Loose

Jack Cookerly

Nelson Riddle

Country of origin United States

Original language(s) English

No. of seasons 4

No. of episodes 118 & two-part pilot (list of episodes)

Production

Executive producer(s) Alan A. Armer

Desi Arnaz

Leonard Freeman

Quinn Martin

Jerry Thorpe

Producer(s) Alan A. Armer

Alvin Cooperman

Walter Grauman

Bert Granet

Paul Harrison

Herman Hoffman

Sidney Marshall

Vincent McEveety

Del Reisman

Norman Retchin

Lloyd Richards

Stuart Rosenberg

Charles Russell

Josef Shaftel

Cinematography Robert B. Hauser

Glen MacWilliams

Charles Straumer

Camera setup Single-camera

Running time 50 minutes

Production company(s) Desilu Productions

Langford Productions

Distributor Desilu Sales (until 1967)

Paramount Domestic Television (1967–2006)

CBS Paramount Domestic Television (2006–2007)

CBS Television Distribution (2007– )

Release

Original network ABC

Picture format Black-and-white

Audio format Monaural

Original release October 15, 1959 – May 21, 1963


The Untouchables is an American crime drama that ran from 1959 to 1963 on the ABC Television Network, produced by Desilu Productions. Based on the memoir of the same name by Eliot Ness and Oscar Fraley, it fictionalized Ness’ experiences as a Prohibition agent, fighting crime in Chicago in the 1930s with the help of a special team of agents handpicked for their courage, moral character, and incorruptibility, nicknamed the Untouchables. The book was later made into a film in 1987 (also called The Untouchables) by Brian De Palma, with a script by David Mamet, and a second, less-successful TV series in 1993.

A powerful, dynamic, hard-hitting action drama, and a landmark crime series,[1] The Untouchables won series star Robert Stack an Emmy Award for Best Actor in a Dramatic Series in 1960.[2]
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BEN CASEY

Ben Casey is an American medical drama series which ran on ABC from 1961 to 1966. The show was known for its opening titles, which consisted of a hand drawing the symbols “♂, ♀, ✳, †, ∞” on a chalkboard, as cast member Sam Jaffe intoned, “Man, woman, birth, death, infinity.”[1] Neurosurgeon Joseph Ransohoff was a medical consultant for the show and may have influenced the personality of the title character.

Plot
The series starred Vince Edwards (credited as Vincent Edwards) as medical doctor Ben Casey, a young, intense but idealistic surgeon at County General Hospital. His mentor was Doctor David Zorba, played by Sam Jaffe. The show began running multi-episode stories, starting with the first five episodes of Season 4; Casey developed a romantic relationship with Jane Hancock (Stella Stevens), who had just emerged from a coma after fifteen years. At the beginning of Season 5 (the last season), Jaffe left the show and Franchot Tone replaced Zorba as new Chief of Neurosurgery, Doctor Daniel Niles Freeland.

Cast
Vincent Edwards as Dr. Ben Casey

Sam Jaffe as Dr. David Zorba (1961-1965)

Harry Landers as Dr. Ted Hoffman

Bettye Ackerman as Dr. Maggie Graham (In real life, Bettye Ackerman was married to Sam Jaffe.)

Nick Dennis as Orderly Nick Kanavaras

Jeanne Bates as Nurse Wills

Franchot Tone as Dr. Daniel Niles Freeland (1965-1966)
en.m.wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on February 25, 2017 in nostalgic, vintage tv shows

 

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THE FABULOUS 52 

Film students and movie buffs everywhere are searching for the lost music and history compositions of The Fabulous 52.  

The Fabulous 52  aired each Saturday night (11:30) on KNXT’s Channel 2 ( late 1950s/Los Angeles)  showing its big, bold  title super imposed upon well lit studios stretched up to the starry night skies. 

A beautiful orchestra flaired  an unknown but unforgettable, classical, opening theme.  Both the music and studio imagery gave prominence to many of Hollywood’s greatest  performances.  The Fabulous 52  is remembered as a most impressive television,  feature film presentation of the late 1950s.   

~~~~

Referencing  “Broadcasting Telecasting (Jan-Mar 1959), ” Tv Movie Missionary • Starlet, Sandy Warner holds up some of the Paramount footage KNXT (TV) Los Angeles charged her with promoting for a movie splash starting this week. 

To herald 12 major motion pictures premiering on KNXT, “Miss Paramount Week” has been calling on  the press, riding in holiday parades, appearing at public functions and posing for lots of pictures. 

Backing up its front woman, KNXT sent up a plane over the New Year’s Day Rose Bowl parade with an exclusive sky-writing franchise to reach an expected 1.5 million parade watchers. Also in the Paramount Week promotion kit:  $50,000 worth of air promotion time, 18,000 lines in local newspapers, four pages in Tv Guide, giant bus posters, market cards, direct mail, bottle labels, billboards and a full- scale publicity campaign in newspapers and magazines. 

The 12 Paramount Week features are being shown on the weeknight Early Show and Big Hit Movies, Saturday’s Fabulous 52 show and a Sunday film program. 

Paramount Week movies star: Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Fredric March, Herbert Marshall, Barbara Stanwyck, Jack Benny, Fred MacMurray, Claudette Colbert, Marlene Dietrich and others. Each and every feature film in this distinguished group offers a sales and rating dream and top-flight stars of first-rate pictures: 

  • CALL NORTHSIDE 777 

Richard  Conte 

  • MOTHER WORE TIGHTS 

Betty Grable, Dan Dailey 

  • THE RAINS CAME 

Tyrone Power, Myrna Loy 

  • HEAVEN CAN WAIT 

Gene Tierney, Don Ameche 

  • CALL OF THE WILD 

Clark Gable, Loretta Young 

  • ROAD TO GLORY 

Fredric March, Lionel Barrymore, James Stewart, Lee J. Cobb


For the full story, 
get in touch today with . . . 
MTA NATIONAL TELEFILM 

HI H ASSOCIATES, INC., 10 Columbus Circle. New York 19 

https://archive.org/stream/broadcastingtele56unse/broadcastingtele56unse_djvu.txt

 

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The Love of Life (1955)

The Love of Life (1955)

​Roy Winsor

Starring Audrey Peters

Ron Tomme

Country of origin United States

Original language(s) English

No. of seasons 29

No. of episodes 7,316

Production

Running time 15 minutes (1951–1958)

30 minutes (1958–1962, 1969–1973, 1979–1980)

25 minutes (1962–1969, 1973–1979)

Release

Original network CBS

Picture format Black-and-white

(1951–1967)

Color

(1967–1980)

Audio format Monaural


Original release September 24, 1951 – February 1, 1980

Love of Life is an American soap opera which aired on CBS from September 24, 1951, to February 1, 1980. It was created by Roy Winsor, whose previous creation Search for Tomorrow had premiered three weeks before Love of Life, and who would go on to create The Secret Storm two and a half years later.

Production 

Love of Life originally came from Liederkranz Hall on East 58th Street in Manhattan. Mike and Buff (Mike Wallace), Ernie Kovacs, and Douglas Edwards and the News, as well as Search for Tomorrow and The Guiding Light also came from that location. The program originated at other studios in Manhattan, but primarily at the CBS Broadcast Center on West 57th Street and CBS’ Studio 52 behind the Ed Sullivan Theater. In 1975, the series moved to make way for a nightclub that became known as Studio 54. Until its final episode in 1980, Love of Life was taped in Studio 44 at the CBS Broadcast Center.

Format 

Unlike most other soap operas, Love of Life was originally not split up into segments dictated by commercial breaks. Because the show was owned by packaged-goods giant American Home Products and merely licensed to CBS, all commercials were for AHP brands, and occurred before or after the show. In the 1960s, one commercial break was allotted around the middle of the program, but this was mostly to allow affiliates to reconnect with the feed after airing local commercials. Love of Life adopted the “five segments per half-hour” standard in the 1970s.

On April 23, 1979, CBS moved Love of Life to the 4:00/3:00 pm slot that had opened when Match Game was canceled. For this slot, episodes again had a full 30-minute duration, accommodating the whole slot. However, ratings plummeted upon relocating; an increasing number of CBS affiliates pre-empted the serial to show more profitable syndicated programming. Beginning in September 1979, in some markets, this included a new daily syndicated version of the Match Game, which went up against (and, in some cases, was shown in place of) Love of Life.

Despite CBS moving the show to the 4:00/3:00 timeslot, some affiliates chose to air it at earlier timeslots in pattern with the other soaps. For example, in Indianapolis, then-CBS affiliate WISH-TV aired Love of Life at 3:30 (Eastern) while airing One Day at a Time reruns at 4:00. Many West Coast stations, such as KNXT (now KCBS-TV) in Los Angeles, did this, as well, keeping Love of Life in tandem with the other soaps by airing it at 2:30 Pacific time, after Guiding Light. Other stations, such as then-O&O KMOX-TV (now KMOV) in St. Louis, kept the show in late morning at 11:00 (Central). Additionally, WUSA (then WDVM) in Washington, DC, chose to keep Love of Life at 11:30 while pre-empting The Price is Right. In the soap’s home market of New York City, WCBS-TV aired it at noon.

Within 10 months, CBS realized that the 4:00 slot would not work for Love of Life in light of affiliate tape-delays and pre-emptions, and subsequently cancelled the show. Its final episode aired on February 1, 1980. The following Monday, The Young and the Restless expanded to an hour, with One Day at a Time moving into the 4:00/3:00 timeslot. According to rumors, once CBS cancelled Love of Life, they intended to use the show’s New York studio space for the 1980 Winter Olympics, which took place later that month in Lake Placid, New York.

Director Larry Auerbach said that he lamented the network’s 4:00/3:00 slot choice on the CBS Evening News the day Love of Life finished airing, feeling that the slot was better suited to airing shows that appealed to kids after school.



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Posted by on February 25, 2017 in classic television

 

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“SCARLET STREET starring Edward G. Robinson”

300px-scarletstreet2.png


Directed by Fritz Lang
Produced by Walter Wanger
Fritz Lang
Screenplay by Dudley Nichols
Based on La Chienne
1931 novel and play
by Georges de La Fouchardière (novel)
André Mouézy-Éon (play)
Starring Edward G. Robinson
Joan Bennett
Dan Duryea
Music by Hans J. Salter
Ernie Burnett
(“Melancholy Baby”)
Cinematography Milton R. Krasner
Edited by Arthur Hilton
Production
company
Fritz Lang Productions
Diana Production Company
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release dates
December 28, 1945 (United States)
February 14, 1946 (New York City, New York)
Running time
103 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $1,202,007[1]
Box office $2,948,386[1]

Scarlet Street is a 1945 film noir directed by Fritz Lang. Two criminals take advantage of a middle-age painter in order to steal his artwork. The film is based on the French novel La Chienne (“The Bitch”) by Georges de La Fouchardière, that previously had been dramatized on stage by André Mouëzy-Éon, and cinematically as La Chienne (1931) by director Jean Renoir.[2]

The principal actors Edward G. Robinson, Joan Bennett and Dan Duryea had earlier appeared together in The Woman in the Window (1944) also directed by Fritz Lang.

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Plot

It’s 1934. Christopher “Chris” Cross (Edward G. Robinson), a meek amateur painter and cashier for clothing retailer, J.J. Hogarth & Company, is fêted by his employer, honoring him for twenty-five years of dull, repetitive service, from 1909-1934. Hogarth presents him with a watch and kind words, then leaves getting into a car with a beautiful young blonde.

Walking home through Greenwich Village, Chris muses to an associate, “I wonder what it’s like to be loved by a young girl.” He helps Kitty (Joan Bennett), an amoral fast-talking femme fatale, apparently being attacked by a man, stunning the assailant with his umbrella. Chris is unaware that the attacker was Johnny (Dan Duryea), Kitty’s brutish boyfriend, and sees her safely to her apartment building. Out of gratitude and bemusement, she accepts his offer for a cup of coffee at a nearby bar. From Chris’s comments about art, Kitty believes him to be a wealthy painter.

Soon, Chris becomes enamored of her because he is in a loveless marriage and is tormented by his shrewish wife Adele (Rosalind Ivan), who idealizes her former husband, a policeman who apparently drowned while trying to save a woman. After Chris confesses that he is married, Johnny convinces Kitty to pursue a relationship in order to extort money from Chris. Kitty inveigles him to rent an apartment for her, one that can also be his art studio. To finance an apartment, Chris steals $500 ($8,800 today) in insurance bonds from his wife and later $1000 ($17,700) from his employer.

Unknown to Chris, Johnny unsuccessfully tries selling some of Chris’s paintings, attracting the interest of art critic David Janeway (Jess Barker). Kitty is maneuvered by Johnny into pretending that she painted them, charming the critic with Chris’s own descriptions of his art, and Janeway promises to represent her. Adele sees her husband’s paintings in the window of a commercial art gallery as the work of “Katherine March” and accuses him of copying her work. Chris confronts Kitty, who claims she sold them because she needed the money. He is so delighted that his paintings are appreciated, albeit only under Kitty’s signature, that he happily lets her become the public face of his art. She becomes a huge commercial success, although Chris never receives any of the money.

Adele’s supposedly dead first husband, Higgins (Charles Kemper), suddenly appears at Chris’s office to extort money from him. He explains he had not drowned but had stolen $2,700 from the purse of the suicide he tried to save. Already suspected as corrupt for taking bribes from speakeasies, he had taken the opportunity to escape his crimes and his wife. Chris lets Higgins into his wife’s room ostensibly so he can get the insurance money from his death but does so when she is asleep in the room, reasoning that his marriage will be invalidated when his wife sees her still-living first husband.

Believing he can now marry Kitty, he goes to see her, but finds out that Kitty has cheated on him. He later confronts Kitty, but still asks her to marry him; she scorns him for being old and refuses to marry him. Enraged he stabs her to death. The police visit Chris at his job, not for the murder but his earlier embezzlement. Although his boss refuses to press charges, Chris is fired. Johnny is accused of Kitty’s murder.

At the trial, all of the deceptions work against Johnny, despite his attempts to implicate Chris, and Chris denies painting any of the pictures. Johnny is convicted and put to death for Kitty’s murder, Chris goes unpunished, and Kitty is erroneously recognized as a great artist.

Haunted by the murder, Chris attempts to hang himself. Although rescued, he is impoverished with no way of claiming credit for his own paintings and tormented by thoughts of Kitty and Johnny being together for eternity, loving each other.

Cast

Edward G. Robinson as Christopher Cross
Joan Bennett as Katherine (Kitty) March
Dan Duryea as Johnny Prince
Margaret Lindsay as Millie Ray
Jess Barker as David Janeway
Rosalind Ivan as Adele Cross
Arthur Loft as Dellarowe
Charles Kemper as Patch-eye Higgins
Russell Hicks as J.J. Hogarth
Samuel S. Hinds as Charles Pringle
Anita Sharp-Bolster as Mrs. Michaels
Vladimir Sokoloff as Pop LeJon
Cy Kendall as Nick
Tom Dillon as Policeman
All primary cast members are deceased.

Production

Scarlet Street reunited director Fritz Lang with actors Edward G. Robinson, Joan Bennett and Dan Duryea, who had worked with him in The Woman in the Window (1944). The film was based on the French novel La Chienne (“The Bitch”) by Georges de La Fouchardière, that previously had been dramatized on stage by André Mouëzy-Éon, and cinematically as La Chienne (1931) by director Jean Renoir. Lang’s 1954 film Human Desire was based on another Renoir film La Bête humaine (film) (1938), which was based on Émile Zola’s novel on the same name. Renoir was said to have disliked both of Lang’s films.

Scarlet Street is similar to The Woman in the Window in themes, cast, crew and characters. Robinson plays a lonely middle-aged man like he did in the earlier film and Bennett and Duryea play the criminal elements again. Both films were photographed by Milton R. Krasner. Walter Wanger, who produced the film, had earlier produced Lang’s 1937 film You Only Live Once.

Despite being considered a classic of film noir along with Lang’s earlier film The Woman in the Window, Robinson, who noticed the thematic similarities between the two, found the Scarlet Street monotonous to do and couldn’t wait to finish it and move on to other projects. Robinson disliked making the former film as well.

Twelve paintings done for the film by John Decker were sent to the Museum of Modern Art in New York City for exhibition in March of 1946.

en.m.wikipedia.org

220px-scarlet_street_p.jpg

 

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