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“CASABLANCA – starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman”

19 Jun

Hal B. Wallis
Screenplay by
Julius J. Epstein
Philip G. Epstein
Howard Koch
Based on Everybody Comes to Rick’s 
by Murray Burnett
Joan Alison
Starring
Humphrey Bogart
Ingrid Bergman
Paul Henreid[1]
Music by Max Steiner
Cinematography Arthur Edeson
Edited by Owen Marks
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release dates
November 26, 1942 (Hollywood Theatre)
January 23, 1943 (United States)
Running time
102 minutes[2]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $878,000[3]
Box office $3.7 million (initial US release)[4]

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Casablanca is a 1942 American romantic drama film directed by Michael Curtiz and based on Murray Burnett and Joan Alison’s unproduced stage play Everybody Comes to Rick’s. The film stars Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, and Paul Henreid; it also features Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, and Dooley Wilson. Set during World War II, it focuses on an American expatriate who must choose between his love for a woman and helping her Czech Resistance leader husband escape the Vichy-controlled city of Casablanca to continue his fight against the Nazis.

Story editor Irene Diamond convinced producer Hal B. Wallis to purchase the film rights to the play in January 1942. Brothers Julius and Philip G. Epstein were initially assigned to write the script. However, despite studio resistance, they left to work on Frank Capra’s Why We Fight series early in 1942. Howard E. Koch was assigned to the screenplay until the Epsteins returned a month later. Casey Robinson assisted with three weeks of rewrites, but his work would later go uncredited. Wallis chose Curtiz to direct the film after his first choice, William Wyler, became unavailable. Principal photography began on May 25, 1942, ending on August 3; the film was shot entirely at Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank, with the exception of one sequence at Van Nuys Airport in Van Nuys, Los Angeles.

Although Casablanca was an A-list film with established stars and first-rate writers, no one involved with its production expected it to be anything out of the ordinary.[5] It was just one of hundreds of pictures produced by Hollywood every year. Casablanca was rushed into release to take advantage of the publicity from the Allied invasion of North Africa a few weeks earlier.[6] It had its world premiere on November 26, 1942, in New York City and was released nationally in the United States on January 23, 1943. The film was a solid if unspectacular success in its initial run.

Casablanca did account for three Academy Awards – Best Picture, Director (Curtiz) and Adapted Screenplay (the Epsteins and Koch) – and gradually its reputation grew. Its lead characters,[7][8] memorable lines,[9][10][11] and pervasive theme song[12] have all become iconic and the film consistently ranks near the top of lists of the greatest films in history.

Plot

In December 1941, American expatriate Rick Blaine is the proprietor of an upscale nightclub and gambling den in Casablanca. “Rick’s Café Américain” attracts a varied clientele: Vichy French and German officials; refugees desperate to reach the still-neutral United States; and those who prey on them. Although Rick professes to be neutral in all matters, it is later revealed he ran guns to Ethiopia during its war with Italy and fought on the Loyalist side in the Spanish Civil War.

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Petty crook Ugarte shows up and boasts to Rick of “letters of transit” obtained by murdering two German couriers. The papers allow the bearers to travel freely around German-controlled Europe and to neutral Portugal, and are thus almost priceless to the refugees stranded in Casablanca. Ugarte plans to sell them at the club that night, and asks Rick to hold them. Before he can meet his contact, he is intercepted by the local police under the command of Captain Louis Renault, an unabashedly corrupt Vichy official. Ugarte dies in custody without revealing that he entrusted the letters to Rick.

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At this point, the reason for Rick’s bitterness—former lover Ilsa Lund—walks into his establishment. Upon spotting Rick’s friend and house pianist, Sam, Ilsa asks him to play “As Time Goes By.” Rick storms over, furious that Sam has disobeyed his order never to perform that song, and is stunned to see Ilsa. She is accompanied by her husband, Victor Laszlo, a renowned fugitive Czech Resistance leader. They need the letters to escape to America to continue his work. German Major Strasser has come to Casablanca to see that Laszlo does not succeed.

When Laszlo makes inquiries, Ferrari, a major underworld figure and Rick’s friendly business rival, divulges his suspicion that Rick has the letters. In private, Rick refuses to sell at any price, telling Laszlo to ask his wife the reason. They are interrupted when Strasser leads a group of officers in singing “Die Wacht am Rhein.” Laszlo orders the house band to play “La Marseillaise.” When the band looks to Rick, he nods his head. Laszlo starts singing, alone at first, then patriotic fervor grips the crowd and everyone joins in, drowning out the Germans. In retaliation, Strasser has Renault close the club.

Bogart and Bergman
That night, Ilsa confronts Rick in the deserted café. When he refuses to give her the letters, she threatens him with a gun, but then confesses that she still loves him. She explains that when they met and fell in love in Paris in 1940, she believed her husband had been killed attempting to escape from a concentration camp. Later, while preparing to flee with Rick from the imminent fall of the city to the German army, she learned that Laszlo was alive and in hiding. She left Rick without explanation to nurse her sick husband.

Rick’s bitterness dissolves. He agrees to help, letting her believe that she will stay with him when Laszlo leaves. When Laszlo unexpectedly shows up, having narrowly escaped a police raid on a Resistance meeting, Rick has waiter Carl spirit Ilsa away. Laszlo, aware of Rick’s love for Ilsa, tries to persuade him to use the letters to take her to safety. When the police arrest Laszlo on a minor, trumped-up charge, Rick persuades Renault to release him by promising to set him up for a much more serious crime: possession of the letters. To allay Renault’s suspicions, Rick explains that he and Ilsa will be leaving for America. When Renault tries to arrest Laszlo as arranged, Rick forces him at gunpoint to assist in their escape. At the last moment, Rick makes Ilsa board the plane to Lisbon with her husband, telling her that she would regret it if she stayed—”Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but soon and for the rest of your life.”

Strasser, tipped off by Renault, drives up alone. Rick kills him when he tries to intervene. When policemen arrive, Renault pauses, then orders them to “round up the usual suspects.” Renault suggests to Rick that they join the Free French in Brazzaville. As they walk away into the fog, Rick says, “Louis, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.”

en.m.Wikipedia.org

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16 responses to ““CASABLANCA – starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman”

  1. paintdigi

    October 10, 2016 at 8:32 am

    interesting film

    Liked by 1 person

     
  2. Frank and Freeda Blunt

    October 11, 2016 at 9:22 am

    One of our favorite films. Thanks for following our humble site, https://triggerreset.net/
    We are also following your site.

    Liked by 1 person

     
  3. America On Coffee

    October 11, 2016 at 11:35 am

    Thank you for the follow and like(s), Frank and Freeda Blunt! Ditto! Look forward to more of your informative shares.:-)

    Liked by 1 person

     
  4. usathroughoureyes

    October 12, 2016 at 1:38 pm

    Great movie.

    Liked by 1 person

     
  5. penneyvanderbilt

    October 14, 2016 at 12:14 pm

    Reblogged this on KCJones.

    Liked by 1 person

     
  6. penneyvanderbilt

    October 14, 2016 at 11:15 pm

    Thank you for writing a great blog

    Like

     
  7. eths

    October 15, 2016 at 11:17 am

    She is one of my favorites!

    Liked by 1 person

     
  8. America On Coffee

    October 15, 2016 at 9:02 pm

    I believe you are speaking of Ingrid Bergman…

    Liked by 1 person

     
  9. eths

    October 15, 2016 at 10:00 pm

    Yes.

    Like

     
  10. America On Coffee

    October 16, 2016 at 5:35 am

    Thank you penneyvanderbilt for your compliment and rebloggings… AOC appreciates your continual share of coffee with us!! Have a great week!

    Like

     
  11. Kim Smyth

    October 19, 2016 at 5:19 am

    What an interesting and creative site you have here!
    This is one of my hubby’s favorite movies of all time. Think I’ll go grab a cup and read your review!

    Liked by 1 person

     
  12. America On Coffee

    October 19, 2016 at 7:02 am

    Thank you Kim Smyth for your likes and kind comment. We hope you and your hubby will enjoy all that we share. AOC look forward to reading more on your most humbling and inviting blog. :-)

    Like

     
  13. Mel A Rowe

    October 31, 2016 at 8:33 pm

    Love the movie. Great post.

    Liked by 1 person

     
  14. America On Coffee

    October 31, 2016 at 9:38 pm

    Thanks for coming by!

    Like

     
  15. Berni

    November 8, 2016 at 1:13 am

    Good ole days when men were gentlemen and they used to treat women as their ladies & lords. Whatever befell this world?

    Liked by 1 person

     
  16. America On Coffee

    November 8, 2016 at 12:23 pm

    We learn from mistakes. Films bad and good are great reality checks.

    Like

     

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