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“Chris Kenner -The Name Of The Place is, I Like It Like That, Parts 1 & 2 (1961)”

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Chris Kenner (December 25, 1929 – January 25, 1976) was a New Orleans R&B singer and songwriter, best known for two hit singles in the early 1960s that became staples in the repertoires of many other musicians.

Biography

Born in the farming community of Kenner, Louisiana, upriver from New Orleans, Kenner sang gospel music with his church choir. He moved to New Orleans when he was in his teens. In 1955 he made his first recordings, for a small label, Baton Records, without success. In 1957 recorded his “Sick and Tired” for Imperial Records; Fats Domino covered it the next year, and his version became a hit. “Rocket to the Moon” and “Life Is Just a Struggle”, both cut for Ron Records, were other notable songs Kenner recorded in this period.

Moving to another New Orleans label, Instant, he began to work with pianist and arranger Allen Toussaint. In 1961, this collaboration produced “I Like It Like That”, his first and biggest hit, peaking at #2 in the Billboard Hot 100 chart (covered in 1965 by the Dave Clark Five), and “Something You Got” (covered by Wilson Pickett, Alvin Robinson, the Ramsey Lewis Trio, Chuck Jackson, Earl Grant, Maxine Brown, Bobby Womack, the Moody Blues (on their 1965 debut album), the American Breed, Fairport Convention and Bruce Springsteen). “I Like It Like That” sold over one million copies and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA.[1] In 1962 he produced his most enduring song, “Land of a Thousand Dances”, which was covered by various artists, including Cannibal & the Headhunters, Thee Midniters, Wilson Pickett, the Action, and Patti Smith.

Kenner continued to record for Instant and for other small local labels, including many of his lesser-known songs from the 1960s, such as “My Wife”, “Packing Up” and “They Took My Money”. He released an album, Land of a Thousand Dances, on Atlantic Records in 1966; the Collectors’ Choice label reissued it on CD in 2007.

In 1968 Kenner was convicted of statutory rape of a minor and spent three years in Louisiana’s Angola prison.

Kenner died from a heart attack in 1976, at the age of 46.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-07-02T10:48:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles07bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 02 Jul 2018 10:48:00 +0000 31, in 1960s, billboard, nostalgic, vintage music

 

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“Big Bopper – Chantilly Lace”

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Jiles Perry “J. P.” Richardson, Jr. (October 24, 1930 – February 3, 1959), commonly known as The Big Bopper, was an American musician, songwriter, and disc jockey, whose big rockabilly look, style, voice, and exuberant personality made him an early rock and roll star. He is best known for his 1958 recording of “Chantilly Lace”.[1]

On February 3, 1959, Richardson died in a plane crash in Clear Lake, Iowa, along with music stars Buddy Holly and Ritchie Valens, and pilot Roger Peterson. That event has become known as “The Day the Music Died” because it is so called in Don McLean’s 1971 song “American Pie”.[2][3]

Biography

J. P. Richardson was born in Sabine Pass, Texas, the oldest son of oil-field worker Jiles Perry Richardson, Sr. and his wife Elise (Stalsby) Richardson. Richardson had two younger brothers, Cecil and James. The family soon moved to Beaumont, Texas. Richardson graduated from Beaumont High School in 1947 and played on the “Royal Purple” football team as a defensive lineman, wearing number 85.[4] Richardson later studied prelaw at Lamar College, and was a member of the band and chorus.

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Posted by on TueAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-19T13:46:29+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesTue, 19 Jun 2018 13:46:29 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, billboard, classic movies, classic music, guy groups, nostalgic

 

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The Monotones – Book Of Love – 1958

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The Monotones were a six-member American doo-wop vocal group in the 1950s. They are considered a one-hit wonder, as their only hit single was “The Book of Love”, which peaked at #5 on the Billboard Top 100 in 1958.

Biography

The Monotones formed in 1955 when the seven original singers, all residents of the Baxter Terrace housing project in Newark, New Jersey,[1] began performing covers of popular songs.
Charles Patrick’s brother James was originally a member, but he left soon after the group’s formation.

They all began singing with the New Hope Baptist Choir, directed by Cissy Houston, who was related to the Patrick brothers.[5] The group launched their career with a 1956 appearance on Ted Mack’s Amateur Hour television program, winning first prize for their rendition of The Cadillacs’ “Zoom”.[3] Soon afterwards, Charles Patrick was listening to the radio and heard a Pepsodent toothpaste commercial with the line “wonder where the yellow went.” From there he got the idea for the line, “I wonder, wonder, wonder who!, who wrote the book of love”, later working it up into a song with Davis and Malone.[6] In September 1957, they recorded “Book Of Love”, which was released on the Mascot label in December that year. The small record company could not cope with its popularity, and it was reissued on Chess Records’ subsidiary Argo label in February 1958. It became a hit, eventually reaching #3 on the Billboard R&B chart and #5 on the pop charts.[1] The record sold over one million copies.[7] It also reached #5 in Australia;[5] in the UK, the hit version was a cover version by The Mudlarks.

The Monotones recorded a series of novelty follow-ups including “Zombi”, and “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”, but they were not successful.

The Monotones disbanded in 1962.

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Posted by on TueAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-19T10:14:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesTue, 19 Jun 2018 10:14:00 +0000 31, in billboard, nostalgic

 

DEE DEE SHARP set my heart at ease”

DEE DEE SHARP set my heart at ease”

Dee Dee Sharp (born Dione LaRue, September 9, 1945, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States[1]) is an American R&B singer, who began her career recording as a backing vocalist in 1961.

Career

In 1962 she began a string of successful Billboard Hot 100 Top 10 hits: “Slow Twistin'” (with Chubby Checker) (#3) for which she was uncredited on the label, “Mashed Potato Time” (#2), “Gravy (For My Mashed Potatoes)” (#9), “Ride” (#5) and “Do the Bird” (#10).[1] Both “Mashed Potato Time” and “Ride” each sold over one million copies, and were awarded gold discs.[2] “Do the Bird” provided her only entry in the UK Singles Chart, where it peaked at #46 in April 1963.[3] In 1967, she married record producer and Philadelphia International co-founder Kenny Gamble and has since recorded under the name Dee Dee Sharp-Gamble. The couple later divorced in 1980.[1]

She had a brief career resurgence during the disco era and hit the charts again with her version of 10 CC’s “I’m Not In Love.” She also joined Lou Rawls, Billy Paul, Teddy Pendergrass, The O’Jays and Archie Bell as a member of the Philadelphia International All Stars, who had a minor hit with “Let’s Clean Up the Ghetto.” In 1980 she spent four weeks at number one on the Hot Dance Club Play chart with “Breaking and Entering” / “Easy Money,” from her album Dee Dee.

More recent appearances included a performance at Pontins in the UK for the Northern Soul Show, and at the 2008 Detroit Jazz Festival. In May 2009, she appeared in Belgium at the Salle De L’Hotel de Ville.

Sharp and her husband Bill Witherspoon have been residents of Medford, New Jersey.[4]

1962, you could buy a 45 rpm vinyl record for $1.00 or a transistor radio for $15.00. There were many mom and pop record stores, and songs were played over and over again…

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-11T16:27:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 11 Jun 2018 16:27:00 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, billboard, female vocalists

 

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Shirley Ellis : The Nitty Gritty 1963 HD

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Shirley Marie O’Garra[1] (stage name: Shirley Ellis; married name: Shirley Elliston;[2] 19 January 1929 – 5 October 2005[3]) was an American soul music singer and songwriter of West Indian origin.[4][5] She is best known for her novelty hits “The Nitty Gritty” (1963) (US no. 8), “The Name Game” (1964) (US no. 3) and “The Clapping Song” (1965) (US no. 8 and UK no. 6). “The Clapping Song” sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[6]

By 1954 she had written two songs which were recorded by The Chords.[5] Ellis was originally in the group The Metronomes and she went on to marry the lead singer, Alphonso Elliston. All her solo hits were written by her and her manager, record producer, and songwriting partner, Lincoln Chase.

Ellis had recording contracts with the Kapp Records subsidiary Congress and later Columbia and Bell, but retired from the music industry in 1968.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-11T10:57:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 11 Jun 2018 10:57:00 +0000 31, in billboard, nostalgic

 

“PAUL AND PAULA – Hey Paula Lyrics”

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“Hey Paula” is an American pop standard love song recorded by the singing duo Paul & Paula. It hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on the week ending February 9, 1963, and also made it to number one on the Hot R&B Singles chart.[1] “Paul” was the song’s writer, Ray Hildebrand,[2] a student at Texas’ Howard Payne University, a Baptist institution in the city of Brownwood. “Paula” was Jill Jackson, the niece of the owner of the boarding house where Ray lived.

Writing and recording

Hildebrand wrote the song, originally titled “Paul and Paula”, taking inspiration from the Annette Funicello hit “Tall Paul”.[3] Hildebrand and Jackson performed the song on a local radio station[4] and the song soon became popular enough for the duo to try to make a professional recording. They went to a studio in Fort Worth, Texas, and were fortunate enough to find a producer, Major Bill Smith, with studio time and musicians booked and a missing lead vocalist. He recorded their version of the song and released it on his LeCam Records label, changing the name to “Hey Paula”, credited to Jill and Ray. When the record became a success, it was picked up by the larger Philips Records, which changed the billing to Paul and Paula.[3]

Success

When the song was released on Phillips, it hit the national charts in late 1962, reaching number one on both the pop and R&B charts in 1963. It spawned a follow-up top ten hit, “Young Lovers”, and a series of other hits for the duo.[5]

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-11T10:24:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 11 Jun 2018 10:24:00 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, billboard, classic movies, duet, female vocalists, nostalgic

 

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“1960 Go Jimmy Go – Jimmy Clanton”

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Jimmy Clanton (born September 2, 1938, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States) is an American singer who became known as the “swamp pop R&B teenage idol”.[1] His band recorded a hit song “Just A Dream” which Clanton had written in 1958 for the Ace Records label. It reached number four on the Billboard chart and sold a million copies.[2] Clanton performed on Dick Clark’s American Bandstand and toured with popular artists like Fats Domino, Jerry Lee Lewis and The Platters.[3]

History

Clanton formed his first band called the Rockets in 1956 while attending Baton Rouge High School.

One of the few white singers to come out of the New Orleans R&B/rock & roll sound, he rode the crest of the popular teen music wave in the 1950s and 1960s. His records charted in the U.S. Top 40 seven times (all released on Ace); his Top 10 records were: the song “Just a Dream,” (Pop #4, R&B #1 in August 1958, credited to ‘Jimmy Clanton and His Rockets’), ”

Go Jimmy Go

” (peaked at number five in late 1959) and “Venus in Blue Jeans” in September 1962 (written by Howard Greenfield and Jack Keller).[4] In early 1961, Clanton was drafted and spent the next two years in the U.S. Army, continuing to have chart successes with “Don’t Look at Me” and “Because I Do.” His next major hit, “Venus in Blue Jeans,” peaked at number seven in mid-1962.[5] His only hit in the UK Singles Chart was “Another Sleepless Night”, which spent one week at number 50 in July 1960.[6]

Clanton starred in a rock and roll movie produced by Alan Freed called Go Johnny Go,[2] and later starred in Teenage Millionaire, with music arranged and produced by Dr. John and arranger/trumpeter Charlie Miller.[7] During the late 1950s and early 1960s Clanton was managed by Cosimo Matassa, the New Orleans recording studio owner and engineer. In May 1960, Ace Records announced in Billboard that Philadelphia had proclaimed the week of May 16 to be “Jimmy Clanton Week.”[8]

Clanton became a disc jockey at WHEX in Columbia, Pennsylvania between 1972 and 1976 and performed in an oldies revue also in the 1970s, The Masters of Rock ‘n’ Roll, with Troy Shondell, Ray Peterson, and Ronnie Dove. He had a religious conversion in the 1980s.[citation needed] In the 1995 Jazz Fest in New Orleans, Clanton performed with Ray Charles, Chuck Berry, and Frankie Ford.

Clanton was inducted into The Museum of the Gulf Coast Hall of Fame, which also has inducted such performers as Tex Ritter, Janis Joplin, ZZ Top and B. J. Thomas.[9]

On April 14, 2007, at a “Legends of Louisiana Celebration & Inductions” concert in Mandeville, Louisiana, Jimmy Clanton was inducted into The Louisiana Music Hall of Fame.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-11T10:08:16+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 11 Jun 2018 10:08:16 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, billboard, nostalgic

 

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