RSS

Category Archives: billboard

“Connie Francis – Where The Boys Are (1960 song with lyrics and movie clip)”

“Connie Francis – Where The Boys Are (1960 song with lyrics and movie clip)”

null

Where the Boys Are is a song written by Neil Sedaka and Howard Greenfield and first recorded by Connie Francis.

Original version by Connie Francis

Premise
When Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer signed Connie Francis for a major starring rôle in the motion picture Where the Boys Are (based on the novel of the same name by Glendon Swarthout), Francis solicited the services of Neil Sedaka and Howard Greenfield, who had written hit songs for her previously (e. g. “Stupid Cupid”), to write original material for her to perform on the film’s soundtrack including a Where the Boys Are title song.

Sedaka and Greenfield wrote two potential title songs for the film, but producer Joe Pasternak dismissed the song preferred by Francis and the songwriting team. The dismissed version in question was never recorded, not even for demonstration purposes, as Francis (vocal) and Sedaka (piano) had presented both songs as a live performance for Pasternak.[1]

Motion Picture Version
The version chosen by Joe Pasternak was recorded for the first time on July 12, 1960 in Hollywood and was only used when combined to medleys with the overture and closing credits scores written by George E. Stoll.[2]

Original Version 1960
Francis recorded the record version of Where the Boys Are on 18 October 1960[3] in a New York City recording session with Stan Applebaum arranging and conducting. The same session also came up with Francis’ hits Many Tears Ago and Breakin’ in a Brand New Broken Heart as well as the songs On the Outside Looking In, Happy New Year Baby, and Mein Herz weiß genau, was es will, which all would remain unreleased until the 1980s.[1]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

Where the Boys Are


DVD cover by Reynold Brown
Directed by Henry Levin
Produced by Joe Pasternak
Screenplay by George Wells
Based on Where the Boys Are (1960 novel) 
by Glendon Swarthout
Starring Connie Francis
Dolores Hart
Paula Prentiss
George Hamilton
Yvette Mimieux
Jim Hutton
Frank Gorshin
Music by Score:
George E. Stoll
Jazz:
Pete Rugolo
Songs:
Neil Sedaka (music)
Howard Greenfield (lyrics)
Cinematography Robert J. Bronner
Edited by Fredric Steinkamp
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release dates
December 28, 1960
Running time
99 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $2 million[1]
Box office $3.5 million (US rentals)[1]

Where the Boys Are (1960) is an Metrocolor and CinemaScope American coming-of-age comedy film, written by George Wells based on the novel of the same name by Glendon Swarthout, about four Midwestern college co-eds who spend spring break in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The title song “Where the Boys Are” was sung by Connie Francis, who also co-starred in a supporting role. The film was aimed at the teen market, featuring sun, sand and romance. Released in the wintertime, it inspired thousands of additional American college students to head to Fort Lauderdale for their annual spring break.

Where the Boys Are was one of the first teen films to explore adolescent sexuality and the changing sexual morals and attitudes among American college youth. It won Laurel awards for Best Comedy of the Year and Best Comedy Actress (Paula Prentiss).

Plot

The main focus of Where the Boys Are is the “coming of age” of four girl students at a midwestern university during spring vacation. As the film opens, Merritt Andrews (Dolores Hart), the smart and assertive leader of the quartet, expresses the opinion in class that premarital sex might be something young women should experience. Her speech eventually inspires the insecure Melanie Tolman (Yvette Mimieux) to lose her virginity soon after the young women arrive in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Tuggle Carpenter (Paula Prentiss), on the other hand, seeks to be a “baby-making machine,” lacking only the man to join her in marriage. Angie (Connie Francis) rounds out the group as an athletic girl who is clueless when it comes to romance.

The girls find their beliefs challenged throughout the film. Merritt, a freshman, meets the suave rich-boy Ivy Leaguer Ryder Smith (George Hamilton), a senior at Brown, and realizes she’s not ready for sex. Melanie discovers that Franklin (Rory Harrity), a boy from Yale who she thought loved her was only using her for sex. Tuggle quickly fixes her attention on the goofy “TV” Thompson (Jim Hutton), a junior at Michigan State, but becomes disillusioned when he becomes enamored of the older woman Lola Fandango (Barbara Nichols), who works as a “mermaid” swimmer/dancer in a local bar. Angie stumbles into love with the eccentric jazz musician Basil (Frank Gorshin).

Merritt, Tuggle, and Angie’s post-adolescent relationship angst quickly evaporates when they discover Melanie is in distress after going to meet Franklin at a motel and instead finding there another of the “Yalies”, Dill, who rapes her. Franklin had moved on to another girl, but told Dill that Melanie was “easy” and set up the ambush. Melanie ends up walking into the nearby road looking distraught, her dress torn. Just as her friends arrive, she is hit by a car and ends up in the hospital.

Ultimately, it seems the group has learned the potentially serious consequences of their actions and resolve to act in a more responsible, mature manner. The film ends on a melancholy note, with Melanie recovering in the hospital while Merritt looks after her, and with Merritt’s promises to Ryder to continue a long-distance relationship. He then offers to drive them back to their college.

en.m.wikipedia.org

Advertisements
 

Tags:

“1960 HITS ARCHIVE – Go Jimmy Go – Jimmy Clanton”

image

Jimmy Clanton (born September 2, 1938, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States) is an American singer who became known as the “swamp pop R&B teenage idol”.[1] His band recorded a hit song “Just A Dream” which Clanton had written in 1958 for the Ace Records label. It reached number four on the Billboard chart and sold a million copies.[2] Clanton performed on Dick Clark’s American Bandstand and toured with popular artists like Fats Domino, Jerry Lee Lewis and The Platters.[3]

History

Clanton formed his first band called the Rockets in 1956 while attending Baton Rouge High School.

One of the few white singers to come out of the New Orleans R&B/rock & roll sound, he rode the crest of the popular teen music wave in the 1950s and 1960s. His records charted in the U.S. Top 40 seven times (all released on Ace); his Top 10 records were: the song “Just a Dream,” (Pop #4, R&B #1 in August 1958, credited to ‘Jimmy Clanton and His Rockets’), “

Go Jimmy Go

” (peaked at number five in late 1959) and “Venus in Blue Jeans” in September 1962 (written by Howard Greenfield and Jack Keller).[4] In early 1961, Clanton was drafted and spent the next two years in the U.S. Army, continuing to have chart successes with “Don’t Look at Me” and “Because I Do.” His next major hit, “Venus in Blue Jeans,” peaked at number seven in mid-1962.[5] His only hit in the UK Singles Chart was “Another Sleepless Night”, which spent one week at number 50 in July 1960.[6]

Clanton starred in a rock and roll movie produced by Alan Freed called Go Johnny Go,[2] and later starred in Teenage Millionaire, with music arranged and produced by Dr. John and arranger/trumpeter Charlie Miller.[7] During the late 1950s and early 1960s Clanton was managed by Cosimo Matassa, the New Orleans recording studio owner and engineer. In May 1960, Ace Records announced in Billboard that Philadelphia had proclaimed the week of May 16 to be “Jimmy Clanton Week.”[8]

Clanton became a disc jockey at WHEX in Columbia, Pennsylvania between 1972 and 1976 and performed in an oldies revue also in the 1970s, The Masters of Rock ‘n’ Roll, with Troy Shondell, Ray Peterson, and Ronnie Dove. He had a religious conversion in the 1980s.[citation needed] In the 1995 Jazz Fest in New Orleans, Clanton performed with Ray Charles, Chuck Berry, and Frankie Ford.

Clanton was inducted into The Museum of the Gulf Coast Hall of Fame, which also has inducted such performers as Tex Ritter, Janis Joplin, ZZ Top and B. J. Thomas.[9]

On April 14, 2007, at a “Legends of Louisiana Celebration & Inductions” concert in Mandeville, Louisiana, Jimmy Clanton was inducted into The Louisiana Music Hall of Fame.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
 

Tags:

Aside

coast rabbit

Marian Breland Bailey – Coast Federal Savings TV Commercial (1950s)

Marian Breland Bailey, born Marian Ruth Kruse (December 2, 1920 …. The Buck Bunny commercial featured their trained rabbits for a Coast Federal Savings … and which still holds the record for longest running TV commercial advertisement.

en.m.wikipedia.org

coast federal savings

Coast Federal Savings TV Commercial (1950s)

 

Tags:

“Tommy Boyce on the Lloyd Thaxton Show – 1964”

image

Lloyd Thaxton

was a local “freelance” announcer in Los Angeles in the late 1950s when, through a deal with a television station manager, got his own weekday television show on KCOP, Lloyd Thaxton’s Record Shop. Record Shop would eventually lead to

The Lloyd Thaxton Show

a live music entertainment show from Los Angeles in the vein of Dick Clark’s American Bandstand. Thaxton’s show was a wacky hour of dancing high school teenagers, skits, and comedy by Thaxton, and musical features by the top pop, rock, folk and country artists of the day. Originally called Lloyd Thaxton’s Hop,

The Lloyd Thaxton Show

which launched on KCOP-TV in late 1961, would go into national syndication in 1964 and become the highest rated musical entertainment program in the U.S. for the next 3 years. In 1967, after more than 2000 episodes, Thaxton retired the show and ventured into other programs and parts of the industry, eventually ending up winning five Emmy Awards with 15 more Emmy nominations. Only about 40 hours of the original 2000+ shows still exist and have been edited into a “Best Of” DVD set, which has been held up because of legalities. Thaxton passed away in 2008 at the age of 81 after a short fight against multiple melanoma.

http://www.tv.com/shows/the-lloyd-thaxton-show/

 

“Little Peggy March – I will follow him (best version)” on YouTube

“Little Peggy March – I will follow him (best version)” on YouTube

Sometimes a guy never knows that his younger sister’s best friend has a’ crush on him…. then he hears the clues in a song:

Little Peggy March – I will follow him (best version): https://youtu.be/5JVhbusBDi4image

 

Tags:

“I LOVE HOW YOU LOVE ME ~ The Paris Sisters (1961)”

image

“I Love How You Love Me” is a song written by Barry Mann and Larry Kolber. It was a 1961 Top Five hit for the pop girl group the Paris Sisters, which inaugurated a string of elaborately produced classic hits by Phil Spector. Bobby Vinton had a Top Ten hit in 1968 with a cover version. The song has been recorded by many other artists over the years.

The Paris Sisters version

Background

The Paris Sisters recorded “I Love How You Love Me” at Gold Star Studios in the autumn of 1961 with Phil Spector as their producer. The group vocalized repeatedly to a piano accompaniment until Spector was satisfied with the balance between the voices, after which a string arrangement which Spector worked on over several days with Hank Levine was added.[1] The song featured a spoken recitation by lead singer Priscilla Paris, speaking the first half of the repeated first verse in an unsung manner over the instrumental break.

According to Lester Sill, with whom Spector was then staying, Spector would bring the tapes for “I Love How You Love Me” from Gold Star Studios every evening to review in his room: “he would wake me up at three or four in the morning, listening to [the song] over and over again at a very low level.” Sill says Spector “must have remixed the strings on that song thirty times; then listened to it for another four or five days before he was sure it was right. Then finally when the record was pressed he listened to the pressing for another two or three days before he gave it an approval.”[1]

Spector’s interest in the song was occasioned by its structural similarity to “To Know Him Is to Love Him”, the No. 1 hit that Spector’s group, the Teddy Bears, had scored in 1958. Annette Kleinbard who had been the Teddy Bears’ vocalist, would weep upon hearing The Paris Sisters’ “I Love How You Love Me” on her car radio: “Before [Priscilla Paris] sung five words I knew it was Phil’s record…it was just the most beautiful record, but I loved it and I hated it at the same time; it felt like Phil had taken my voice and passed it on to someone else”.[1] However Priscilla Paris would opine: “My sound was not like Annette’s – she had a very thin type of little girl voice. I have a heavy roque – that’s a French word meaning very heavy, husky – voice. I think Phil fell into something he wanted to do, added extra ingredients, and ended up with something different.”[2]

“I Love How You Love Me” was originally intended for Tony Orlando, to be arranged in the same upbeat style as Orlando’s precedent hits “Bless You” and “Halfway to Paradise”.1 The song was written by Barry Mann and Larry Kolber (aka Kolberg) who were staff writers at Don Kirshner’s Aldon Music near the Brill Building. Kolber had written the lyrics on a restaurant napkin within five minutes. When Phil Spector discovered the song on a visit to Kirshner’s Aldon offices he persuaded Kirshner that the song would have more potential if rendered by a female act. Spector then recorded “I Love How You Love Me” with The Paris Sisters.

Entering the Top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100 in October 1961, “I Love How You Love Me” reached No. 5 that November.[3]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

Tags:

“Patsy Cline Sweet Dreams”

image

Virginia Patterson Hensley
(September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963),
known professionally as …

Patsy Cline

was an American singer. Part of the early 1960s Nashville sound, Cline successfully “crossed over” to pop music and was one of the most influential, successful and acclaimed vocalists of the 20th century.[1][2] She died at the age of 30 in a multiple-fatality crash in the private plane of her manager, Randy Hughes.

Cline was best known for her rich tone, emotionally expressive and bold contralto voice[3] and her role as a country music industry pioneer. Along with Kitty Wells,[4] she helped pave the way for women as headline performers in the genre. Cline was cited as an inspiration by singers in several styles.[5] Books, movies, documentaries, articles and stage plays document her life and career.

Her hits began in 1957 with Donn Hecht’s and Alan Block’s “Walkin’ After Midnight”, Hank Cochran’s and Harlan Howard’s “I Fall to Pieces”, Hank Cochran’s “She’s Got You”, Willie Nelson’s “Crazy” and ended in 1963 with Don Gibson’s “

Sweet Dreams.”

Millions of her records have sold since her death. She won awards and accolades, causing many to view her as an icon at the level of Jim Reeves, Johnny Cash and Elvis Presley. Ten years after her death, in 1973, she became the first female solo artist inducted to the Country Music Hall of Fame. In 1999, she was voted number 11 on VH1’s special, The 100 Greatest Women in Rock and Roll, by members and artists of the rock industry.[6] In 2002, country music artists and industry members voted her Number One on CMT’s The 40 Greatest Women of Country Music and ranked 46th in the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time” issue of Rolling Stone magazine. According to her 1973 Country Music Hall of Fame plaque, “Her heritage of timeless recordings is testimony to her artistic capacity.”

en.m.Wikipedia.org

“Patsy Cline – Sweet dreams (of you) – 1963” on YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7k2SsEqAyv8&feature=youtube_

 

Tags:

 
%d bloggers like this: