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“The Snows of Kilimanjaro – Trailer” 

“The Snows of Kilimanjaro – Trailer” 

Featured scene: Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner meet


The Snows of Kilimanjaro is a 1952 American Technicolor film based on the filmversion of the short story was directed by Henry King, written by Casey Robinson, and starred Gregory Peck as Harry, Susan Haywardas Helen, and Ava Gardner as Cynthia Green (a character invented for the film). The film’s ending does not mirror the book’s ending.[3]

PLOT

The film begins with the opening words of Hemingway’s story: “Kilimanjaro is a snow-covered mountain 19,710 feet high, and is said to be the highest mountain in Africa. Its western summit is called the Masai ‘Ngje Ngi,’ the House of God. Close to the western summit there is the dried and frozen carcass of a leopard. No one has explained what the leopard was seeking at that altitude.”[3]

The story centers on the memories of disillusioned writer Harry Street (Gregory Peck) who is on safari in Africa. He has a severely infected wound from a thorn prick, and lies outside his tent awaiting a slow death, though in the film it is pointed out he may have acquired the infection from leaping into a muddy river to rescue one of the safari‘s porters from a hippo after he falls in the river. His female companion Helen (Susan Hayward) nurses Harry and hunts game for the larder.

The loss of mobility brings self-reflection. In an often delirious state he remembers his past relationship with Cynthia (Ava Gardner) who he met in Paris as members of the “Lost Generation“. Upon the sale of Harry’s first novel, rather than rent a nicer home, Harry wishes to go on safari to Africa. There he has his happiest moments; Harry bags a rhino whilst Cynthia becomes pregnant. Upon their return to Paris, Cynthia’s love for Harry and her desire not to impede the excitement-addicted Harry’s travels as a successful journalist and author lead her to bring about a miscarriage so their child won’t slow down Harry’s career. Suffering depression and sinking into alcoholism. she eventually leaves Harry for a flamenco dancer when she believes Harry is off for a job as a war correspondent.

Harry later becomes engaged to the wealthy and socially connected Countess Elizabeth (Hildegard Knef) who he meets on the Cote d’Azur; however he still remains loyal to the memory of Cynthia. On the eve of their wedding a drunken Elizabeth confronts Harry with a letter to Harry sent from Cynthia now in Madrid. Elizabeth destroys the letter in front of Harry who stalks off to go to Spain. Unable to find Cynthia at the Madrid address on the envelope, he enlists to fight in the Spanish Civil War. During a battle he meets Cynthia who is now an ambulance driver. Cynthia is mortally wounded and Harry is shot and wounded when he deserts the battle to try and bring the dying Cynthia to a doctor.

Peck recalls his memories from what he thinks is his deathbed in Africa

After the death of his beloved mentor Uncle Bill (Leo G. Carroll), Harry receives as a bequest a letter from his uncle that gives him the riddle of the leopard. Harry’s bartender suggests that the leopard ended up there as he was on a false scent and became lost, but Harry takes Helen on a safari to Kenya to learn the answer of the riddle. He is injured and develops an infection. As Harry nears death, the protective Helen fights off a witch doctor

 and by reading an emergency first aid manual, opens Harry’s wound to release the infection. At the dawn a medical party arrives by airplane. The vultures and hyena who have been awaiting Harry’s death leave and never return. Harry realises his love for Helen.

 

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“Pocketful Of Miracles Trailer 1961” 

“Pocketful Of Miracles Trailer 1961” 

Pocketful of Miracles is a 1961 American comedy film starring Bette Davis and Glenn Ford, and directed by Frank Capra. The screenplay by Hal Kanter and Harry Tugend is based on the screenplay Lady for a Day by Robert Riskin, which was adapted from the Damon Runyon short story “Madame La Gimp”.

The film proved to be the final project for both Capra and veteran actor Thomas Mitchell but also featured the film debut of Ann-Margret.

Supporting player Peter Falk was nominated for an Academy Award but George Chakiris won that year for West Side Story. Capra said that Falk’s performance was a bright spot in this “miserable film.”

The 1989 film Miracles starring Jackie Chan and Anita Mui, and the 2008 film Singh Is Kinng starring Akshay Kumarand Katrina Kaif are based on Pocketful of Miracles.

Dave the Dude (Glenn Ford) is a successful, very superstitious New York City gangster who buys apples from street peddler Apple Annie (Bette Davis) to bring him good luck. On the eve of a very important meeting, he finds Annie terribly upset.

Annie, it turns out, has a daughter named Louise (Ann-Margret), who was sent to a school in Europe as a child, but is now a grown woman. Louise believes her mother to be wealthy socialite Mrs. E. Worthington Manville, and she is bringing her aristocratic fiancé Carlos and his father, Count Alfonso Romero (Arthur O’Connell), to meet her. Annie has been pretending that she resides in a luxurious hotel (writing her letters on stolen hotel stationery) and has Louise’s letters mailed there, then intercepted by a friend and handed over to her.

Dave’s good-hearted girlfriend Queenie Martin (Hope Lange) persuades him to help Annie continue her charade. Queenie takes on the task of transforming the derelict into a dowager. Dave arranges for cultured pool hustler “Judge” Henry G. Blake (Thomas Mitchell) to pose as Annie’s husband. He installs her in an out-of-town friend’s suite in the hotel, complete with Hudgins (Edward Everett Horton), his friend’s butler.

When Dave keeps postponing a meeting with an extremely powerful gangster to help Annie, his right-hand man Joy Boy (Peter Falk) becomes increasingly exasperated. Dave manages to engineer a lavish reception with New York’s mayor and governor as guests. Louise and her impressed future husband and father-in-law return to Europe, none the wiser about her mother’s real identity.

Wikipedia.org

 

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Flower Drum Song, a 1961 Musical Stage play and film adaption

Music Richard Rodgers
Lyrics Oscar Hammerstein II
Book
Oscar Hammerstein II
Joseph Fields
David Henry Hwang (2002 Revised Version)
Basis Novel by C. Y. Lee
Productions
1958 Broadway
1960 West End
2002 Broadway revival
Flower Drum Song was the eighth musical by the team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. It was based on the 1957 novel, The Flower Drum Song, by Chinese-American author C. Y. Lee. The piece opened in 1958 on Broadway and was afterwards presented in the West End and on tour. It was subsequently made into a 1961 musical film.

After their extraordinary early successes, beginning with Oklahoma! in 1943, Rodgers and Hammerstein had written two musicals in the 1950s that did not do well and sought a new hit to revive their fortunes. Lee’s novel focuses on a father, Wang Chi-yang, a wealthy refugee from China, who clings to traditional values in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Rodgers and Hammerstein shifted the focus of the musical to his son, Wang Ta, who is torn between his Chinese roots and assimilation into American culture. The team hired Gene Kelly to make his debut as a stage director with the musical and scoured the country for a suitable Asian – or at least, plausibly Asian-looking – cast. The musical, much more light-hearted than Lee’s novel, was profitable on Broadway and was followed by a national tour.

After the release of the 1961 film version, the musical was rarely produced, as it presented casting issues and fears that Asian-Americans would take offense at how they are portrayed. When it was put on the stage, lines and songs that might be offensive were often cut. The piece did not return to Broadway until 2002, when a version with a plot by playwright David Henry Hwang (but retaining most of the original songs) was presented after a successful Los Angeles run. Hwang’s story retains the Chinatown setting and the inter-generational and immigrant themes, and emphasizes the romantic relationships. It received mostly poor reviews in New York and closed after six months but had a short tour and has since been produced regionally.

Henry Koster
Produced by Ross Hunter
Screenplay by Joseph Fields
Based on Flower Drum Song
by Oscar Hammerstein II
Joseph Fields
Starring Nancy Kwan
James Shigeta
Miyoshi Umeki
Jack Soo
Benson Fong
Juanita Hall
Music by Richard Rodgers
Cinematography Russell Metty
Edited by Milton Carruth
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release dates
November 9, 1961
Running time
132 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Cantonese
Budget $4 million[1]
Box office $5 million (US/ Canada rentals) [2]
Flower Drum Song is a 1961 film adaptation of the 1958 Broadway musical Flower Drum Song, written by the composer Richard Rodgers and the lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II. The film and stage play were based on the 1957 novel of the same name by the Chinese American author C. Y. Lee.

In 2008, Flower Drum Song was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Plot

A young woman named Mei Li arrives from China as an illegal immigrant with her father in San Francisco, California to enter into an arranged marriage with the owner of a night club, Sammy Fong (inspired by the actual Forbidden City nightclub). Her intended is already involved with his leading showgirl, Linda Low, and does his best to dissuade Mei Li from marrying him, sending her to live in the house of Master Wang, where he presents her as prospect for Master Wang’s son, Wang Ta. Dissolving the marriage contract is harder than either of them imagine. Master Wang is persuaded by his sister-in-law, Madame Liang, to allow Mei Li to fall in love naturally with Master Wang’s son, Wang Ta. But Wang Ta is dazzled by the charms of Linda, who ‘enjoys being a girl’, and succeeds in landing a date with her, during which she convinces him to give her his fraternity pin (it symbolizes that they’re “going steady”). Linda wishes to use Wang Ta to get a real commitment from Sammy Fong, who gets wind of her plan when Linda attends a party in honor of Wang Ta’s and Madame Liang’s graduation from university and citizenship classes, respectively. At the party, Linda has another club employee pretend to be her brother, and grant his permission for Linda to marry Wang Ta. Mei Li, hearing this, becomes discouraged, while Ta and his father argue over his marriage plans. Ta argues that he is old enough to make his own decisions, but the father says that he will be the one to let Ta know when he is old enough.

Sammy, in an effort to keep Linda from marrying Wang Ta, arranges to have Wang Ta (and his family) see her nightclub act, where he is shocked at her performance. He leaves, distraught, accompanied by his friend since childhood, the seamstress Helen Chao, who also grew up in America and deeply loves Wang Ta. Ta becomes drunk in his misery over Linda, and Helen ends up letting him stay for the night in her apartment. She sings “Love Look Away”, about her unrequited love. In the morning, Mei Li comes to deliver a burned coat for Helen to mend, and becomes distressed when she discovers Wang Ta’s clothing in Helen’s kitchen. When Wang Ta wakes up (seconds after Mei Li leaves), he still does not notice Helen’s affections, even as she pleads for him to stay, and he leaves quickly. He goes to speak with Mei Li, now realizing that she is a better match for him than Linda Low, only to have Mei Li reject him, saying that she once loved him, but not anymore. She and her father leave Master Wang’s house and pursue the marriage contract between Mei Li and Sammy Fong. This is unfortunate in that Sammy has already proposed to Linda, but now will be unable to marry her (the contract is binding). Before the wedding, Wang Ta goes to see Mei Li, and they both realize that they are deeply in love with one another. They agree to try to come up with a way to get Mei Li out of her marriage contract.

The day of the wedding, right before she is to sip from a goblet (which would seal her marriage to Sammy), Mei Li declares that, because she entered the United States illegally, the contract is null and void. Wang Ta can thus marry Mei Li, and Sammy decides to marry Linda right there as well, resulting in a double wedding. Helen ends up empty handed (in fact, she does not appear again after Wang Ta leaves her apartment). In the novel, Ta’s rejection actually leads her to commit suicide.

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Flowerdrum

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“King Kong (1933) Official 1938 Re-Release Trailer – King Kong Movie” 

“King Kong (1933) Official 1938 Re-Release Trailer – King Kong Movie” 

King Kong is a giant movie monster, resembling a giant ape, that has appeared in various media since 1933. The character first appeared in the 1933 film King Kong from RKO Pictures, which received universal acclaim upon its initial release and re-releases. A sequel quickly followed that same year with Son of Kong, featuring a Little Kong. In the 1960s, Toho produced King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962), pitting a much larger Kong against Toho’s own Godzilla, and King Kong Escapes (1967), based on The King Kong Show (1966–1969) from Rankin/Bass Productions. In 1976, Dino De Laurentiis produced a modern remake of the original film directed by John Guillermin. A sequel, King Kong Lives, followed a decade later featuring a Lady Kong. Another remake of the original, this time set in 1933, was released in 2005 from filmmaker Peter Jackson.

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 “The Long, Hot Summer (1/3) Movie CLIP – You Talk a Lot (1958) HD”

 “The Long, Hot Summer (1/3) Movie CLIP – You Talk a Lot (1958) HD”

A Long Hot Summer[2] (FinnishPitkä kuuma kesä) is a 1999 Finnish rock comedy film written and directed by Perttu Leppä. It was the most popular youth film of the 1990s in Finland.[3] The film, set in 1980, tells the story of a fictional rock band called Kalle Päätalo. Due to the film’s popularity, the band started to tour around the country.

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“The Black Orchid – Trailer” 


THE FILM

Rose Bianco (Sophia Loren) a florist widowed by a famous gangster, looks for happiness with widower Frank Valente (Anthony Quinn). Rose is dealing with her son Ralph in a work farm for troubled boys, while for Frank, his grown up daughter Mary (Ina Balin) takes care of everything for him. Noble and Mary love each other and are engaged, but Mary refuses to marry him because she worries about who will take care of her father. She asks Noble to marry her and stay with her in her father’s house. At the same time, however, she refuses to accept Rose as her stepmother and allow her to join the family. Before Frank’s wedding day Mary irons Frank’s clothes, cooks all the food and locks herself in her room. This leads Rose and Frank to call everything off, devastating them both.

When Rose’s son finds out, he disappointedly runs away from the work farm, leading the police to come and search for him in the house. The next day, Noble comes and sees Frank is sleeping in his chair and Mary has still confined herself in upstairs. He asks her to come out, but there is no answer. Noble decides he will drop Frank off at Rose’s house and will wait at the church for him. Frank finds out that Rose is waiting beside the telephone for news about Ralph and reveals how miserable he is, torn between her and his daughter.

Frank leaves and joins Noble in the church and Rose heads for Frank’s house to confront Mary. Her son comes to the church, hoping to see his mother one last time before they send him to reform school. Frank and Noble bring him back to the farm and manage an agreement with the boarding manager, Mr. Harmon. On the other hand, thinking herself alone in the house, Mary unlocks the door and comes out of the room. There she meets Rose, who has decided to try to help Frank find happiness, even if it is not with her. Rose argues her point with Mary and makes her understand Rose’s love for her father, and finally Mary accepts her, asking her to stay for coffee. Frank, Rose, Noble, and Mary have breakfast together. In the end, Rose and Frank take Ralph out of the work farm and the three happily walk toward the horizon.

ABOUT  SOPHIA LOREN

Her talents as an actress were not recognized until her performance as Cesira in Vittorio De Sica‘s Two Women; Loren’s performance earned her the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1962 and made her the first artist to win an Oscar for a foreign-language performance. She holds the record for having earned six David di Donatello Awards for Best Actress: Two WomenYesterday, Today and TomorrowMarriage Italian Style (for which she was nominated for a second Oscar); SunflowerThe Voyage; and A Special Day. After starting a family in the early 1970s, Loren chose to make only occasional film appearances. In later years, she has appeared in American films such as Grumpier Old Men and Nine.

Aside from the Academy Award, she has won a Grammy Award, five special Golden Globes, a BAFTA Award, a Laurel Award, the Volpi Cup for Best Actress at the Venice Film Festival, the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival, and the Honorary Academy Award in 1991. In 1995, she received the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievements, one of many such awards. In 1999, Loren was acknowledged as one of the top 25 female American screen legends in the American Film Institute‘s survey, AFI’s 100 Years…100 Stars.[1]

THE CAST


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 “DINO (1957) Sal Mineo gets his face slapped Bloody * Violence” 

 “DINO (1957) Sal Mineo gets his face slapped Bloody * Violence” 

Dino is a 1957 film directed by Thomas Carr, written by Reginald Rose, and starring Sal MineoBrian Keith and Susan Kohner. It was an adaptation of a teleplay of the same name originally broadcast in 1956 on Westinghouse Studio One. The picture was released as part of a double feature in April 1957 and the running time is 94 minutes.


Salvatore Mineo, Jr. (January 10, 1939 – February 12, 1976),[2] was an American film and theatre actor, known for his performance as John “Plato” Crawford opposite James Dean in the film Rebel Without a Cause (1955).[3] He was twice nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, for his roles in Rebel Without a Cause and Exodus (1960).

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