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“Psycho (1960) starring Anthony Perkins” 

“Psycho (1960) starring Anthony Perkins” 

Psycho is a 1960 American psychological horror film directed and produced by Alfred Hitchcock, and written by Joseph Stefano, starring Anthony PerkinsJanet LeighJohn GavinVera Miles and Martin Balsam, and was based on the 1959 novel of the same name by Robert Bloch. The film centers on the encounter between a secretary, Marion Crane (Leigh), who ends up at a secluded motel after stealing money from her employer, and the motel’s disturbed owner-manager, Norman Bates (Perkins), and its aftermath.[4]

When originally made, Psycho was seen as a departure from Hitchcock’s previous film North by Northwest, having been filmed on a low budget, with a television crew and in black and white. The film initially received mixed reviews, but outstanding box office returns prompted reconsideration which led to overwhelming critical acclaim and four Academy Award nominations, including Best Supporting Actress for Leigh and Best Director for Hitchcock.

Psycho is now considered one of Hitchcock’s best films[5] and praised as a major work of cinematic art by international film critics and scholars. Often ranked among the greatest films of all time, it set a new level of acceptability for violence, deviant behavior and sexuality in American films,[6] and is widely considered to be the earliest example of the slasher filmgenre.

After Hitchcock’s death in 1980, Universal Studios began producing follow-ups: three sequels, a remake, a television film spin-off, and a prequel TV series. In 1992, the US Library of Congress deemed the film “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry.

During a lunchtime tryst in Phoenix, Arizona, a real estate secretary named Marion Crane discusses with her boyfriend, Sam Loomis, how they cannot afford to get married because of Sam’s debts. After lunch, Marion returns to work, where a client drops off a $40,000 cash payment on a property. Her boss asks her to deposit the money in the bank, and she asks if she can take the rest of the afternoon off. Returning home, she begins to pack, deciding to steal the money and give it to Sam in Fairvale, California. She is seen by her boss on her way out of town, which makes her nervous. 

During the trip, she pulls over on the side of the road and falls asleep, only to be awakened by a state patrol officer. Suspicious about her nervous behavior, he notes her license plate number and follows her at a close distance. Hoping to shake his pursuit, Marion stops at an automobile dealership and trades in her Ford Mainline, with its Arizona license plates, for a Ford Custom 300 that has California tags.

Driving on, Marion stops for the night at the Bates Motel. The proprietor, Norman Bates, invites her to a light dinner after she checks in. She accepts, but then hears an argument between Norman and his mother about bringing a woman into her house. They eat in the motel parlor, where he tells her about his life with his mother, who is mentally ill and forbids him to have a life outside of her. Her sense of compassion and responsibility awakened by Norman’s story, Marion decides to go back to Phoenix in the morning to return the stolen money, and prepares for bed. As she is showering, a shadowy figure comes in and stabs her to death with a chef’s knife. Norman discovers the murder and assumes his mother is responsible. He meticulously cleans up the crime scene, putting Marion’s corpse and her possessions—including the embezzled money—into the trunk of her car and sinking it in the swamps near the motel.

.

A week later, Marion’s sister Lila arrives in Fairvale and confronts Sam about the whereabouts of her sister. Private investigator Milton Arbogast approaches them and confirms that Marion is wanted for stealing the $40,000. He checks the motels, and Norman’s evasive and inconsistent answers arouse his suspicions. After hearing that Marion had met Norman’s mother, he asks to speak with her, but Norman refuses. Arbogast calls Lila and Sam to update them. He goes to the Bates’ home in search of Norman’s mother; as he reaches the top of the stairs, he is attacked and murdered. When Lila and Sam do not hear from Arbogast, Sam visits the motel. He finds only Mrs. Bates, who ignores his knocking. Lila and Sam go to the local sheriff, who informs them that Mrs. Bates killed herself ten years ago, and concludes that Arbogast lied to confuse them and made off with the $40,000. Still convinced that some ill has befallen Arbogast, Lila and Sam make their way to the motel. Norman takes his unwilling mother from her room and hides her in the fruit cellar.

At the motel, Lila and Sam meet Norman. Sam distracts him by striking up a conversation while Lila sneaks up to the house. When Sam tells Norman they’ve come to question his mother, he knocks Sam out and rushes to the house. Lila sees Norman approaching and hides by going down steps that lead to the fruit cellar. There she finds Mrs. Bates sitting in a chair. Lila turns her around and discovers that she is in fact a mummified corpse. Lila screams as Norman runs into the cellar, holding a chef’s knife and wearing his mother’s clothes and a wig. Before Norman can attack Lila, Sam, having regained consciousness, subdues him.

At the local courthouse, a psychiatrist explains that Norman murdered Mrs. Bates and her lover ten years prior out of jealousy. Unable to bear the guilt, he exhumed her corpse and began to treat it as if she were still alive. In order to preserve that illusion, he recreated his mother in his own mind as an alternate personality, often dressing in her clothes and talking to himself in her voice. This “Mother” personality is jealous and possessive: whenever Norman feels attracted to a woman, “Mother” kills her. As “Mother”, Norman had killed two young girls prior to Marion, as well as Arbogast. The psychiatrist says the “Mother” personality has taken permanent hold of Norman’s mind. While Norman sits in a holding cell, “Mother” protests that the murders were Norman’s doing and that she “wouldn’t even harm a fly.” Meanwhile, Marion’s car is pulled out of the swamp.

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on August 14, 2017 in classic movies, suspense

 

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“The Snows of Kilimanjaro – Trailer” 

“The Snows of Kilimanjaro – Trailer” 

Featured scene: Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner meet


The Snows of Kilimanjaro is a 1952 American Technicolor film based on the filmversion of the short story was directed by Henry King, written by Casey Robinson, and starred Gregory Peck as Harry, Susan Haywardas Helen, and Ava Gardner as Cynthia Green (a character invented for the film). The film’s ending does not mirror the book’s ending.[3]

PLOT

The film begins with the opening words of Hemingway’s story: “Kilimanjaro is a snow-covered mountain 19,710 feet high, and is said to be the highest mountain in Africa. Its western summit is called the Masai ‘Ngje Ngi,’ the House of God. Close to the western summit there is the dried and frozen carcass of a leopard. No one has explained what the leopard was seeking at that altitude.”[3]

The story centers on the memories of disillusioned writer Harry Street (Gregory Peck) who is on safari in Africa. He has a severely infected wound from a thorn prick, and lies outside his tent awaiting a slow death, though in the film it is pointed out he may have acquired the infection from leaping into a muddy river to rescue one of the safari‘s porters from a hippo after he falls in the river. His female companion Helen (Susan Hayward) nurses Harry and hunts game for the larder.

The loss of mobility brings self-reflection. In an often delirious state he remembers his past relationship with Cynthia (Ava Gardner) who he met in Paris as members of the “Lost Generation“. Upon the sale of Harry’s first novel, rather than rent a nicer home, Harry wishes to go on safari to Africa. There he has his happiest moments; Harry bags a rhino whilst Cynthia becomes pregnant. Upon their return to Paris, Cynthia’s love for Harry and her desire not to impede the excitement-addicted Harry’s travels as a successful journalist and author lead her to bring about a miscarriage so their child won’t slow down Harry’s career. Suffering depression and sinking into alcoholism. she eventually leaves Harry for a flamenco dancer when she believes Harry is off for a job as a war correspondent.

Harry later becomes engaged to the wealthy and socially connected Countess Elizabeth (Hildegard Knef) who he meets on the Cote d’Azur; however he still remains loyal to the memory of Cynthia. On the eve of their wedding a drunken Elizabeth confronts Harry with a letter to Harry sent from Cynthia now in Madrid. Elizabeth destroys the letter in front of Harry who stalks off to go to Spain. Unable to find Cynthia at the Madrid address on the envelope, he enlists to fight in the Spanish Civil War. During a battle he meets Cynthia who is now an ambulance driver. Cynthia is mortally wounded and Harry is shot and wounded when he deserts the battle to try and bring the dying Cynthia to a doctor.

Peck recalls his memories from what he thinks is his deathbed in Africa

After the death of his beloved mentor Uncle Bill (Leo G. Carroll), Harry receives as a bequest a letter from his uncle that gives him the riddle of the leopard. Harry’s bartender suggests that the leopard ended up there as he was on a false scent and became lost, but Harry takes Helen on a safari to Kenya to learn the answer of the riddle. He is injured and develops an infection. As Harry nears death, the protective Helen fights off a witch doctor

 and by reading an emergency first aid manual, opens Harry’s wound to release the infection. At the dawn a medical party arrives by airplane. The vultures and hyena who have been awaiting Harry’s death leave and never return. Harry realises his love for Helen.

 

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“Pocketful Of Miracles Trailer 1961” 

“Pocketful Of Miracles Trailer 1961” 

Pocketful of Miracles is a 1961 American comedy film starring Bette Davis and Glenn Ford, and directed by Frank Capra. The screenplay by Hal Kanter and Harry Tugend is based on the screenplay Lady for a Day by Robert Riskin, which was adapted from the Damon Runyon short story “Madame La Gimp”.

The film proved to be the final project for both Capra and veteran actor Thomas Mitchell but also featured the film debut of Ann-Margret.

Supporting player Peter Falk was nominated for an Academy Award but George Chakiris won that year for West Side Story. Capra said that Falk’s performance was a bright spot in this “miserable film.”

The 1989 film Miracles starring Jackie Chan and Anita Mui, and the 2008 film Singh Is Kinng starring Akshay Kumarand Katrina Kaif are based on Pocketful of Miracles.

Dave the Dude (Glenn Ford) is a successful, very superstitious New York City gangster who buys apples from street peddler Apple Annie (Bette Davis) to bring him good luck. On the eve of a very important meeting, he finds Annie terribly upset.

Annie, it turns out, has a daughter named Louise (Ann-Margret), who was sent to a school in Europe as a child, but is now a grown woman. Louise believes her mother to be wealthy socialite Mrs. E. Worthington Manville, and she is bringing her aristocratic fiancé Carlos and his father, Count Alfonso Romero (Arthur O’Connell), to meet her. Annie has been pretending that she resides in a luxurious hotel (writing her letters on stolen hotel stationery) and has Louise’s letters mailed there, then intercepted by a friend and handed over to her.

Dave’s good-hearted girlfriend Queenie Martin (Hope Lange) persuades him to help Annie continue her charade. Queenie takes on the task of transforming the derelict into a dowager. Dave arranges for cultured pool hustler “Judge” Henry G. Blake (Thomas Mitchell) to pose as Annie’s husband. He installs her in an out-of-town friend’s suite in the hotel, complete with Hudgins (Edward Everett Horton), his friend’s butler.

When Dave keeps postponing a meeting with an extremely powerful gangster to help Annie, his right-hand man Joy Boy (Peter Falk) becomes increasingly exasperated. Dave manages to engineer a lavish reception with New York’s mayor and governor as guests. Louise and her impressed future husband and father-in-law return to Europe, none the wiser about her mother’s real identity.

Wikipedia.org

 

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Flower Drum Song, a 1961 Musical Stage play and film adaption

Music Richard Rodgers
Lyrics Oscar Hammerstein II
Book
Oscar Hammerstein II
Joseph Fields
David Henry Hwang (2002 Revised Version)
Basis Novel by C. Y. Lee
Productions
1958 Broadway
1960 West End
2002 Broadway revival
Flower Drum Song was the eighth musical by the team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. It was based on the 1957 novel, The Flower Drum Song, by Chinese-American author C. Y. Lee. The piece opened in 1958 on Broadway and was afterwards presented in the West End and on tour. It was subsequently made into a 1961 musical film.

After their extraordinary early successes, beginning with Oklahoma! in 1943, Rodgers and Hammerstein had written two musicals in the 1950s that did not do well and sought a new hit to revive their fortunes. Lee’s novel focuses on a father, Wang Chi-yang, a wealthy refugee from China, who clings to traditional values in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Rodgers and Hammerstein shifted the focus of the musical to his son, Wang Ta, who is torn between his Chinese roots and assimilation into American culture. The team hired Gene Kelly to make his debut as a stage director with the musical and scoured the country for a suitable Asian – or at least, plausibly Asian-looking – cast. The musical, much more light-hearted than Lee’s novel, was profitable on Broadway and was followed by a national tour.

After the release of the 1961 film version, the musical was rarely produced, as it presented casting issues and fears that Asian-Americans would take offense at how they are portrayed. When it was put on the stage, lines and songs that might be offensive were often cut. The piece did not return to Broadway until 2002, when a version with a plot by playwright David Henry Hwang (but retaining most of the original songs) was presented after a successful Los Angeles run. Hwang’s story retains the Chinatown setting and the inter-generational and immigrant themes, and emphasizes the romantic relationships. It received mostly poor reviews in New York and closed after six months but had a short tour and has since been produced regionally.

Henry Koster
Produced by Ross Hunter
Screenplay by Joseph Fields
Based on Flower Drum Song
by Oscar Hammerstein II
Joseph Fields
Starring Nancy Kwan
James Shigeta
Miyoshi Umeki
Jack Soo
Benson Fong
Juanita Hall
Music by Richard Rodgers
Cinematography Russell Metty
Edited by Milton Carruth
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release dates
November 9, 1961
Running time
132 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Cantonese
Budget $4 million[1]
Box office $5 million (US/ Canada rentals) [2]
Flower Drum Song is a 1961 film adaptation of the 1958 Broadway musical Flower Drum Song, written by the composer Richard Rodgers and the lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II. The film and stage play were based on the 1957 novel of the same name by the Chinese American author C. Y. Lee.

In 2008, Flower Drum Song was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Plot

A young woman named Mei Li arrives from China as an illegal immigrant with her father in San Francisco, California to enter into an arranged marriage with the owner of a night club, Sammy Fong (inspired by the actual Forbidden City nightclub). Her intended is already involved with his leading showgirl, Linda Low, and does his best to dissuade Mei Li from marrying him, sending her to live in the house of Master Wang, where he presents her as prospect for Master Wang’s son, Wang Ta. Dissolving the marriage contract is harder than either of them imagine. Master Wang is persuaded by his sister-in-law, Madame Liang, to allow Mei Li to fall in love naturally with Master Wang’s son, Wang Ta. But Wang Ta is dazzled by the charms of Linda, who ‘enjoys being a girl’, and succeeds in landing a date with her, during which she convinces him to give her his fraternity pin (it symbolizes that they’re “going steady”). Linda wishes to use Wang Ta to get a real commitment from Sammy Fong, who gets wind of her plan when Linda attends a party in honor of Wang Ta’s and Madame Liang’s graduation from university and citizenship classes, respectively. At the party, Linda has another club employee pretend to be her brother, and grant his permission for Linda to marry Wang Ta. Mei Li, hearing this, becomes discouraged, while Ta and his father argue over his marriage plans. Ta argues that he is old enough to make his own decisions, but the father says that he will be the one to let Ta know when he is old enough.

Sammy, in an effort to keep Linda from marrying Wang Ta, arranges to have Wang Ta (and his family) see her nightclub act, where he is shocked at her performance. He leaves, distraught, accompanied by his friend since childhood, the seamstress Helen Chao, who also grew up in America and deeply loves Wang Ta. Ta becomes drunk in his misery over Linda, and Helen ends up letting him stay for the night in her apartment. She sings “Love Look Away”, about her unrequited love. In the morning, Mei Li comes to deliver a burned coat for Helen to mend, and becomes distressed when she discovers Wang Ta’s clothing in Helen’s kitchen. When Wang Ta wakes up (seconds after Mei Li leaves), he still does not notice Helen’s affections, even as she pleads for him to stay, and he leaves quickly. He goes to speak with Mei Li, now realizing that she is a better match for him than Linda Low, only to have Mei Li reject him, saying that she once loved him, but not anymore. She and her father leave Master Wang’s house and pursue the marriage contract between Mei Li and Sammy Fong. This is unfortunate in that Sammy has already proposed to Linda, but now will be unable to marry her (the contract is binding). Before the wedding, Wang Ta goes to see Mei Li, and they both realize that they are deeply in love with one another. They agree to try to come up with a way to get Mei Li out of her marriage contract.

The day of the wedding, right before she is to sip from a goblet (which would seal her marriage to Sammy), Mei Li declares that, because she entered the United States illegally, the contract is null and void. Wang Ta can thus marry Mei Li, and Sammy decides to marry Linda right there as well, resulting in a double wedding. Helen ends up empty handed (in fact, she does not appear again after Wang Ta leaves her apartment). In the novel, Ta’s rejection actually leads her to commit suicide.

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“Around the World in 80 Days” (1956) 

“Around the World in 80 Days” (1956) 


Around the World in 80 Days (sometimes spelled as Around the World in Eighty Days) is a 1956 American epic adventurecomedy film starring David Niven and Cantinflas, produced by the Michael Todd Company and released by United Artists.

The epic picture was directed by Michael Anderson and produced by Mike Todd, with Kevin McClory and William Cameron Menzies as associate producers. The screenplay was written by James PoeJohn Farrow, and S. J. Perelman based on the classic novel of the same name by Jules Verne. The music score was composed by Victor Young, and the Todd-AO 70 mmcinematography (shot in Technicolor) was by Lionel Lindon. The film’s seven-minute-long animated title sequence, shown at the end of the film, was created by award-winning designer Saul Bass.[3]

The film won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture.[4]

Broadcast journalist Edward R. Murrowpresents an onscreen prologue, featuring footage from A Trip to the Moon (1902) by Georges Méliès, explaining that it is based loosely on the book From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne.[5] Also included is the launching of an unmanned rocket and footage of the earth receding.

In 1872, an English gentleman Phileas Fogg (David Niven) claims he can circumnavigate the world in eighty days. He makes a £20,000 wager (around to £1.6 million today[6]) with four sceptical fellow members of the Reform Club(each contributing £5,000 to the bet) that he can arrive back eighty days from exactly 8:45 pm that evening.

Together with his resourceful valet, Passepartout (Cantinflas), Fogg goes hopscotching around the globe generously spending money to encourage others to help him get to his destinations faster so he can accommodate tight steamship schedules. They set out on the journey from Paris by hot air balloon upon learning the mountain train tunnel is blocked. The two accidentally end up in Spain, where Passepartout engages in a comic bullfight. Next, he goes to Brindisi. Meanwhile, suspicion grows that Fogg has stolen £55,000 (around £4.4 million today[6]) from the Bank of England so Police Inspector Fix (Robert Newton) is sent out by Scotland Yard to trail him (starting in Suez) and keeps waiting for a warrant to arrive so he can arrest Fogg in the British ports they visit. In India, Fogg and Passepartout rescue young widow Princess Aouda (Shirley MacLaine) from being forced into a funeral pyre with her late husband. The three visit Hong Kong, Yokohama, San Francisco, and the Wild West. After sailing across the Atlantic, and only hours short of winning his wager, Fogg is arrested upon arrival at Liverpool, by the diligent yet misguided Inspector Fix.

At the jail, the humiliated Fix informs Fogg that the real culprit was caught in Brighton. Though he is now exculpated, he has insufficient time to reach London before his deadline and thus has lost everything – but the love of the winsome Aouda. Salvation is at hand when, upon returning to London, Passepartout buys a newspaper and sees it is still Saturday. Fogg then realizes that by traveling east towards the rising sun and by crossing the International Date Line, he has gained a day. There is still time to reach the Reform Club and win the bet. Fogg arrives at the club just before the 8:45 pm chime. Aouda and Passepartout then arrive, surprising everyone, as no woman has ever entered the Reform Club before.

CAST


David Niven as Phileas Fogg


Cantinflas as Passepartout

Shirley MacLaine as Princess Aouda

Robert Newton as Inspector Fix

CAMEO APPEARANCES

Finlay Currie as Andrew Stuart, Reform Club member

Robert Morley as Gauthier Ralph, Reform Club member and Bank of England Governor

Ronald Squire as a Reform Club member

Basil Sydney as a Reform Club member

Noël Coward as Roland Hesketh-Baggott, London employment agency manager

Sir John Gielgud as Foster, Fogg’s former valet

Trevor Howard as Denis Fallentin, Reform Club member

Harcourt Williams as Hinshaw, a Reform Club steward

Martine Carol as a girl in the Paris railway station

Fernandel as a Paris coachman

Charles Boyer as Monsieur Gasse, balloonist

Evelyn Keyes as a Paris flirt

José Greco as a flamenco dancer

Luis Miguel Dominguín as a bullfighter

Gilbert Roland as Achmed Abdullah

Cesar Romero as Abdullah’s henchman

Alan Mowbray as the British Consul at Suez

Sir Cedric Hardwicke as Sir Francis Cromarty

Melville Cooper as Mr. Talley, steward on the RMS Mongolia

Reginald Denny as a Bombay police inspector

Ronald Colman as a Great Indian Peninsular Railway official

Robert Cabal as an elephant driver-guide

Charles Coburn as a Hong Kong steamship company clerk

Peter Lorre as a steward on the SS Carnatic

George Raft as the bouncer of the Barbary Coast Saloon

Red Skelton as a drunk at the saloon

Marlene Dietrich as the saloon hostess

John Carradine as Col. Stamp Proctor of San Francisco

Frank Sinatra as the saloon pianist

Buster Keaton as a train conductor (San Francisco to Fort Kearney)

Col. Tim McCoy as a US Cavalry Colonel

Joe E. Brown as the Fort Kearney stationmaster

Andy Devine as the first mate of the SS Henrietta

Edmund Lowe as the engineer of the SS Henrietta

Victor McLaglen as the helmsman of the SS Henrietta

Jack Oakie as the Captain of the SS Henrietta

Beatrice Lillie as a London revivalist leader

John Mills as a London carriage driver

Glynis Johns as a Sporting Lady

Hermione Gingold as a Sporting Lady

Edward R. Murrow as the prologue narrator

A. E. Matthews as a Reform Club member

Ronald Adam as a Reform Club steward

Walter Fitzgerald as a Reform Club member

Frank Royde as a clergyman

Mike Mazurki as a Hong Kong drunk

Richard Wattis as Inspector Hunter of Scotland Yard (uncredited)

Keye Luke as an old man at Yokohama travel office (uncredited)

Felix Felton as a Reform Club member (uncredited)

Philip Ahn as Hong Kong citizen (uncredited)

 
 

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“King Kong (1933) Official 1938 Re-Release Trailer – King Kong Movie” 

“King Kong (1933) Official 1938 Re-Release Trailer – King Kong Movie” 

King Kong is a giant movie monster, resembling a giant ape, that has appeared in various media since 1933. The character first appeared in the 1933 film King Kong from RKO Pictures, which received universal acclaim upon its initial release and re-releases. A sequel quickly followed that same year with Son of Kong, featuring a Little Kong. In the 1960s, Toho produced King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962), pitting a much larger Kong against Toho’s own Godzilla, and King Kong Escapes (1967), based on The King Kong Show (1966–1969) from Rankin/Bass Productions. In 1976, Dino De Laurentiis produced a modern remake of the original film directed by John Guillermin. A sequel, King Kong Lives, followed a decade later featuring a Lady Kong. Another remake of the original, this time set in 1933, was released in 2005 from filmmaker Peter Jackson.

Wikipedia.org

 
 

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THE FABULOUS 52 

Film students and movie buffs everywhere are searching for the lost music and history compositions of The Fabulous 52.  

The Fabulous 52 aired each Saturday night (11:30) on KNXT’s Channel 2 ( late 1950s/Los Angeles)  showing its big, bold  title superimposed upon the well-lit, KNXT/CBS studio.   Who can forget the spot-aerial lights that stretched out  into the starry night skies?

A beautiful orchestra flaired  an unknown but unforgettable, classical, opening theme.  Both the music and studio imagery gave prominence to many of Hollywood’s greatest  performances.  The Fabulous 52  is remembered as a most impressive television,  feature film presentation of the late 1950s.   

~~~~

Referencing  “Broadcasting Telecasting (Jan-Mar 1959), ” Tv Movie Missionary • Starlet, Sandy Warner holds up some of the Paramount footage KNXT (TV) Los Angeles charged her with promoting for a movie splash starting this week. 

To herald 12 major motion pictures premiering on KNXT, “Miss Paramount Week” has been calling on  the press, riding in holiday parades, appearing at public functions and posing for lots of pictures. 

Backing up its front woman, KNXT sent up a plane over the New Year’s Day Rose Bowl parade with an exclusive sky-writing franchise to reach an expected 1.5 million parade watchers. Also in the Paramount Week promotion kit:  $50,000 worth of air promotion time, 18,000 lines in local newspapers, four pages in Tv Guide, giant bus posters, market cards, direct mail, bottle labels, billboards and a full- scale publicity campaign in newspapers and magazines. 

The 12 Paramount Week features are being shown on the weeknight Early Show and Big Hit Movies, Saturday’s Fabulous 52 show and a Sunday film program. 

Paramount Week movies star: Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Fredric March, Herbert Marshall, Barbara Stanwyck, Jack Benny, Fred MacMurray, Claudette Colbert, Marlene Dietrich and others. Each and every feature film in this distinguished group offers a sales and rating dream and top-flight stars of first-rate pictures: 

  • CALL NORTHSIDE 777 

Richard  Conte 

  • MOTHER WORE TIGHTS 

Betty Grable, Dan Dailey 

  • THE RAINS CAME 

Tyrone Power, Myrna Loy 

  • HEAVEN CAN WAIT 

Gene Tierney, Don Ameche 

  • CALL OF THE WILD 

Clark Gable, Loretta Young 

  • ROAD TO GLORY 

Fredric March, Lionel Barrymore, James Stewart, Lee J. Cobb


For the full story,
get in touch today with . . .
MTA NATIONAL TELEFILM

HI H ASSOCIATES, INC., 10 Columbus Circle. New York 19 

https://archive.org/stream/broadcastingtele56unse/broadcastingtele56unse_djvu.txt

 

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