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“Sweet Bird Of Youth – Paul Newman and Geraldine Page (TRAILER)” 

“Sweet Bird Of Youth – Paul Newman and Geraldine Page (TRAILER)” 

Sweet Bird of Youth is a 1959 play by Tennessee Williams which tells the story of a gigolo and drifter, Chance Wayne, who returns to his home town as the companion of a faded movie star, Alexandra Del Lago (travelling incognito as Princess Kosmonopolis), whom he hopes to use to help him break into the movies. The main reason for his homecoming is to get back what he had in his youth: primarily, his old girlfriend, whose father had run him out of town years before. The play was written for Tallulah Bankhead good friend of Tennessee.

Wikipedia.org

Summary

Drifter Chance Wayne returns to his hometown after many years of trying to make it in the movies. Arriving with him is a faded film star he picked up along the way, Alexandra Del Lago. While trying to get her help to make a screen test, he also finds the time to meet his former girlfriend Heavenly, the daughter of the local politician Tom ‘Boss’ Finley, who more or less forced him to leave the town many years ago. —Mattias ThuressonSelf-professed to be from the wrong side of the tracks from St. Cloud, Florida, Chance Wayne loves Heavenly Finley, the daughter of wealthy ‘Boss’ Thomas J. Finley, a corrupt and ruthless politician who rules the town. Thomas does whatever he needs to to break the two up, and manages to run Chance out of town. An aspiring actor, Chance rolls back into St. Cloud with temperamental and drunken Alexandra Del Lago, a once great movie actress whose star has since faded. Picking her up at a party, Chance sees Alexandra as his professional meal ticket. Chance is back in St. Cloud to try and get back together with Heavenly, who still loves Chance but will not cross her powerful father if only to save Chance. Boss wants to run Chance out of town again, but it will be a little more difficult this time if only because of the notoriety of Miss Del Lago. The fortunes of all involved may hinge on some secret information concerning Chance and Heavenly. —Huggo

http://m.imdb.com/title/tt0056541/plotsummary

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 “The Locket (1946)” starring Lorraine Day and Robert Mitchum


  1. Directed by John Brahm
    Produced by Bert Granet
    Written by Sheridan Gibney
    Starring Laraine Day
    Brian Aherne
    Robert Mitchum
    Gene Raymond
    Music by Roy Webb
    Cinematography Nicholas Musuraca
    Edited by J.R. Whittredge
    Distributed by RKO Pictures
    Release dates
    December 20, 1946[1]
    Running time
    85 minutes
    Country United States
    Language English
    Box office $1,750,000 (US)[2]

The Locket is a 1946 film noir directed by John Brahm, starring Laraine Day, Brian Aherne, Robert Mitchum, and Gene Raymond, and released by RKO Pictures. The film is based on a screenplay by Sheridan Gibney, adapted from “What Nancy Wanted” by Norma Barzman, wife of later-blacklisted writer Ben Barzman.[3] It is noted for its complex use of layered flashbacks (flashbacks within flashbacks) to give psychological depth to the narrative.

Plot
A story told in a number of flashbacks from different points of view, this psychological drama tells the story of a bride-to-be (Day) who, as a child, was falsely accused of theft. She grows up to become a kleptomaniac, inveterate liar, and eventually a murderess.

Apparently, all her misdeeds are an attempt by the woman to get her revenge on the world that has falsely accused her of stealing as a child by ruining people’s lives. After splitting up with an artist (Mitchum), and her psychiatrist husband (Aherne), she becomes engaged to the son (Raymond) of the woman who had accused her of thievery. Back in the present day, at her wedding, the young woman collapses physically and mentally as she walks to the altar.


Cast
Laraine Day as Nancy Monks Blair Patton
Brian Aherne as Dr. Harry Blair
Robert Mitchum as Norman Clyde
Gene Raymond as John Willis
Sharyn Moffett as Nancy, age 10
Ricardo Cortez as Drew Bonner
Katherine Emery as Mrs. Willis
Helene Thimig as Mrs. Monks
Reginald Denny as Mr. Wendell
Nella Walker as Mrs. Wendell
Henry Stephenson as Lord Wyndham
Lillian Fontaine as Lady Wyndham
Martha Hyer (guest at reception for bride-to-be, uncredited)
Ellen Corby (kitchen cook, uncredited)

en.m.wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on September 25, 2017 in classic film star, classic movies

 

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 “I Want to Live! Official Trailer #1 – Susan Hayward Movie (1958) HD” 

​Directed by Robert Wise

Produced by Walter Wanger

Screenplay by Nelson Gidding

Don Mankiewicz

Based on Newspaper articles and letters

by Edward S. Montgomery

Barbara Graham

Starring Susan Hayward

Simon Oakland

Virginia Vincent

Theodore Bikel

Music by Johnny Mandel

Cinematography Lionel Lindon

Edited by William Hornbeck

Production

company

Figaro

Distributed by United Artists

Release date

November 18, 1958 (United States)

Running time

120 minutes

Country United States

Language English

Budget $1,383,578[1]

Box office $5,641,711[1]

I Want to Live! is a 1958 film noir written by Nelson Gidding and Don Mankiewicz, produced by Walter Wanger, and directed by Robert Wise, which tells the story of a woman, Barbara Graham, a habitual criminal convicted of murder and facing execution. It stars Susan Hayward as Graham, and also features Simon Oakland, Stafford Repp, and Theodore Bikel. The movie was adapted from letters written by Graham and newspaper articles written by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ed Montgomery. It presents a somewhat fictionalized version of the case showing a possibility of innocence concerning Graham. Today, the charge would be known as felony murder.
The film earned six Oscar nominations, with Hayward winning a Best Actress Oscar at the 31st Academy Awards.
PLOT

The film tells the story of the life and execution of Barbara Graham (Hayward), a prostitute and convicted perjurer. Graham is the product of a broken home, and works luring men into fixed card games. At one point, she attempts to go straight but marries the “wrong man,” and has a child. He is a drug addict and she ends their relationship.

When her life falls apart, she returns to her former professions and becomes involved with a man who had murdered a woman. The police arrest them, and her companions accuse her of the murder to reduce their own chances of going to the gas chamber. She claims her innocence, but is convicted and executed.

 

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“Stella Dallas starring Barbara Stanwyck (1937)” 

Stella Dallas is a 1937 American film based on the Olive Higgins Prouty novel of the same name. It was directed by King Vidor, and stars Barbara Stanwyck, John Boles, and Anne Shirley. Stanwyck was nominated for Best Actress in a Leading Role, and Shirley for Best Actress in a Supporting Role.[1]
A 1925 silent film version is Stella Dallas, starring Ronald Colman and Belle Bennett. A 1990 version is Stella, with Bette Midler and Stephen Collins.

Plot 
Stella Martin (Barbara Stanwyck), the daughter of a mill worker in a post-World War I Massachusetts factory town, is determined to better herself. She sets her sights on mill executive Stephen Dallas (John Boles) and catches him at an emotionally vulnerable time. Stephen’s father killed himself after losing his fortune.

Penniless, Stephen disappeared from high society, intending to marry his fiancée Helen (Barbara O’Neil) once he was financially able to support her. However, just as he reaches his goal, he reads in the newspaper the announcement of her wedding. So he marries Stella.

A year later, their daughter Laurel (played by Anne Shirley as a young woman) is born. To Stella’s great surprise, she discovers she has a strong maternal instinct. Even when she is out dancing and partying, she cannot help but think about her child. As Laurel grows up, Stella’s ambition and scheming to rise socially is redirected to her daughter.

Stephen dotes on Laurel as well, but she is the only bond between husband and wife. He tries to help Stella become more refined, but without success. He also strongly disapproves of her continuing friendship with the vulgar Ed Munn (Alan Hale). Finally, when Stephen receives a promotion that requires him to move to New York, Stella tells him he can go without her or Laurel; they separate, but remain married. Laurel stays with her mother, but visits her father periodically.

Years later, Stephen runs into Helen, now a wealthy widow with three sons. They renew their acquaintance. Laurel is invited to stay at Helen’s mansion; she gets along very well with Helen and her sons. Stephen asks Stella for a divorce, but she turns him down.

Stella takes Laurel to a fancy resort, where Laurel and Richard Grosvenor III (Tim Holt) fall in love. However, when Stella makes her first appearance after recovering from an illness, she becomes the target of derision for her vulgarity, though she herself is unaware of it. Embarrassed for her mother, Laurel insists they leave at once without telling her why. On the train back, Stella overhears the truth.

Stella goes to talk with Helen. After learning that Helen and Stephen would marry if they could, she agrees to a divorce and asks that Laurel go live with them. Helen realizes the reason for the request and agrees.

When Laurel learns of the arrangement, she refuses to put up with it and returns home. However, Stella has been notified by a telegram and is ready for her. Stella pretends that she wants Laurel off her hands so she can marry Ed Munn and travel to South America. Laurel runs crying back to her father.

Later, Laurel and Richard get married. Stella watches them exchange their wedding vows from the city street through a window (whose curtains have been opened at Helen’s order), her presence unnoticed in the darkness and among the other curious bystanders. She then she slips away in the rain, alone but triumphant in having arranged her daughter’s happiness.

en.m.wikipedia.org


 
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Posted by on September 18, 2017 in classic movies, nostalgic

 

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“The Snows of Kilimanjaro – Trailer” 

“The Snows of Kilimanjaro – Trailer” 

Featured scene: Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner meet


The Snows of Kilimanjaro is a 1952 American Technicolor film based on the filmversion of the short story was directed by Henry King, written by Casey Robinson, and starred Gregory Peck as Harry, Susan Haywardas Helen, and Ava Gardner as Cynthia Green (a character invented for the film). The film’s ending does not mirror the book’s ending.[3]

PLOT

The film begins with the opening words of Hemingway’s story: “Kilimanjaro is a snow-covered mountain 19,710 feet high, and is said to be the highest mountain in Africa. Its western summit is called the Masai ‘Ngje Ngi,’ the House of God. Close to the western summit there is the dried and frozen carcass of a leopard. No one has explained what the leopard was seeking at that altitude.”[3]

The story centers on the memories of disillusioned writer Harry Street (Gregory Peck) who is on safari in Africa. He has a severely infected wound from a thorn prick, and lies outside his tent awaiting a slow death, though in the film it is pointed out he may have acquired the infection from leaping into a muddy river to rescue one of the safari‘s porters from a hippo after he falls in the river. His female companion Helen (Susan Hayward) nurses Harry and hunts game for the larder.

The loss of mobility brings self-reflection. In an often delirious state he remembers his past relationship with Cynthia (Ava Gardner) who he met in Paris as members of the “Lost Generation“. Upon the sale of Harry’s first novel, rather than rent a nicer home, Harry wishes to go on safari to Africa. There he has his happiest moments; Harry bags a rhino whilst Cynthia becomes pregnant. Upon their return to Paris, Cynthia’s love for Harry and her desire not to impede the excitement-addicted Harry’s travels as a successful journalist and author lead her to bring about a miscarriage so their child won’t slow down Harry’s career. Suffering depression and sinking into alcoholism. she eventually leaves Harry for a flamenco dancer when she believes Harry is off for a job as a war correspondent.

Harry later becomes engaged to the wealthy and socially connected Countess Elizabeth (Hildegard Knef) who he meets on the Cote d’Azur; however he still remains loyal to the memory of Cynthia. On the eve of their wedding a drunken Elizabeth confronts Harry with a letter to Harry sent from Cynthia now in Madrid. Elizabeth destroys the letter in front of Harry who stalks off to go to Spain. Unable to find Cynthia at the Madrid address on the envelope, he enlists to fight in the Spanish Civil War. During a battle he meets Cynthia who is now an ambulance driver. Cynthia is mortally wounded and Harry is shot and wounded when he deserts the battle to try and bring the dying Cynthia to a doctor.

Peck recalls his memories from what he thinks is his deathbed in Africa

After the death of his beloved mentor Uncle Bill (Leo G. Carroll), Harry receives as a bequest a letter from his uncle that gives him the riddle of the leopard. Harry’s bartender suggests that the leopard ended up there as he was on a false scent and became lost, but Harry takes Helen on a safari to Kenya to learn the answer of the riddle. He is injured and develops an infection. As Harry nears death, the protective Helen fights off a witch doctor

 and by reading an emergency first aid manual, opens Harry’s wound to release the infection. At the dawn a medical party arrives by airplane. The vultures and hyena who have been awaiting Harry’s death leave and never return. Harry realises his love for Helen.

 
 

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“Psycho (1960) starring Anthony Perkins” 

“Psycho (1960) starring Anthony Perkins” 

Psycho is a 1960 American psychological horror film directed and produced by Alfred Hitchcock, and written by Joseph Stefano, starring Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, John Gavin, Vera Miles and Martin Balsam, and was based on the 1959 novel of the same name by Robert Bloch. The film centers on the encounter between a secretary, Marion Crane (Leigh), who ends up at a secluded motel after stealing money from her employer, and the motel’s disturbed owner-manager, Norman Bates (Perkins), and its aftermath.[4]

When originally made, Psycho was seen as a departure from Hitchcock’s previous film North by Northwest, having been filmed on a low budget, with a television crew and in black and white. The film initially received mixed reviews, but outstanding box office returns prompted reconsideration which led to overwhelming critical acclaim and four Academy Award nominations, including Best Supporting Actress for Leigh and Best Director for Hitchcock.

Psycho is now considered one of Hitchcock’s best films[5] and praised as a major work of cinematic art by international film critics and scholars. Often ranked among the greatest films of all time, it set a new level of acceptability for violence, deviant behavior and sexuality in American films,[6] and is widely considered to be the earliest example of the slasher filmgenre.

After Hitchcock’s death in 1980, Universal Studios began producing follow-ups: three sequels, a remake, a television film spin-off, and a prequel TV series. In 1992, the US Library of Congress deemed the film “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry.

During a lunchtime tryst in Phoenix, Arizona, a real estate secretary named Marion Crane discusses with her boyfriend, Sam Loomis, how they cannot afford to get married because of Sam’s debts. After lunch, Marion returns to work, where a client drops off a $40,000 cash payment on a property. Her boss asks her to deposit the money in the bank, and she asks if she can take the rest of the afternoon off. Returning home, she begins to pack, deciding to steal the money and give it to Sam in Fairvale, California. She is seen by her boss on her way out of town, which makes her nervous.

During the trip, she pulls over on the side of the road and falls asleep, only to be awakened by a state patrol officer. Suspicious about her nervous behavior, he notes her license plate number and follows her at a close distance. Hoping to shake his pursuit, Marion stops at an automobile dealership and trades in her Ford Mainline, with its Arizona license plates, for a Ford Custom 300 that has California tags.

Driving on, Marion stops for the night at the Bates Motel. The proprietor, Norman Bates, invites her to a light dinner after she checks in. She accepts, but then hears an argument between Norman and his mother about bringing a woman into her house. They eat in the motel parlor, where he tells her about his life with his mother, who is mentally ill and forbids him to have a life outside of her. Her sense of compassion and responsibility awakened by Norman’s story, Marion decides to go back to Phoenix in the morning to return the stolen money, and prepares for bed. As she is showering, a shadowy figure comes in and stabs her to death with a chef’s knife. Norman discovers the murder and assumes his mother is responsible. He meticulously cleans up the crime scene, putting Marion’s corpse and her possessions—including the embezzled money—into the trunk of her car and sinking it in the swamps near the motel.

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A week later, Marion’s sister Lila arrives in Fairvale and confronts Sam about the whereabouts of her sister. Private investigator Milton Arbogast approaches them and confirms that Marion is wanted for stealing the $40,000. He checks the motels, and Norman’s evasive and inconsistent answers arouse his suspicions. After hearing that Marion had met Norman’s mother, he asks to speak with her, but Norman refuses. Arbogast calls Lila and Sam to update them. He goes to the Bates’ home in search of Norman’s mother; as he reaches the top of the stairs, he is attacked and murdered. When Lila and Sam do not hear from Arbogast, Sam visits the motel. He finds only Mrs. Bates, who ignores his knocking. Lila and Sam go to the local sheriff, who informs them that Mrs. Bates killed herself ten years ago, and concludes that Arbogast lied to confuse them and made off with the $40,000. Still convinced that some ill has befallen Arbogast, Lila and Sam make their way to the motel. Norman takes his unwilling mother from her room and hides her in the fruit cellar.

At the motel, Lila and Sam meet Norman. Sam distracts him by striking up a conversation while Lila sneaks up to the house. When Sam tells Norman they’ve come to question his mother, he knocks Sam out and rushes to the house. Lila sees Norman approaching and hides by going down steps that lead to the fruit cellar. There she finds Mrs. Bates sitting in a chair. Lila turns her around and discovers that she is in fact a mummified corpse. Lila screams as Norman runs into the cellar, holding a chef’s knife and wearing his mother’s clothes and a wig. Before Norman can attack Lila, Sam, having regained consciousness, subdues him.

At the local courthouse, a psychiatrist explains that Norman murdered Mrs. Bates and her lover ten years prior out of jealousy. Unable to bear the guilt, he exhumed her corpse and began to treat it as if she were still alive. In order to preserve that illusion, he recreated his mother in his own mind as an alternate personality, often dressing in her clothes and talking to himself in her voice. This “Mother” personality is jealous and possessive: whenever Norman feels attracted to a woman, “Mother” kills her. As “Mother”, Norman had killed two young girls prior to Marion, as well as Arbogast. The psychiatrist says the “Mother” personality has taken permanent hold of Norman’s mind. While Norman sits in a holding cell, “Mother” protests that the murders were Norman’s doing and that she “wouldn’t even harm a fly.” Meanwhile, Marion’s car is pulled out of the swamp.

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on September 11, 2017 in classic movies, suspense

 

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“Mutiny on the Bounty  Movie Clip Half Rations” 

Mutiny on the Bounty is a 1962 American Technicolor epic historical drama film starring Marlon Brando, Trevor Howard and Richard Harris, based on the novel Mutiny on the Bountyby Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall.

The film retells the 1789 real-life mutinyaboard HMAV Bounty led by Fletcher Christian against the ship’s captain, William Bligh. It is the second American film to be made from the novel, the first being Mutiny on the Bounty (1935). It was directed by Lewis Milestone, who replaced Carol Reed early in the production schedule, and it turned out to be Milestone’s final film.

The screenplay was written by Charles Lederer (with uncredited input from Eric Ambler, William L. Driscoll, Borden Chase, John Gay and Ben Hecht).[2] The score was composed by Bronisław Kaper.

Mutiny on the Bounty was filmed in the Ultra Panavision 70 widescreen process, the first motion picture so credited. It was partly shot on location in the South Pacific. Behind the scenes, Marlon Brando effectively took over directing duties himself and caused it to become far behind schedule and over budget — resulting in director Carol Reed pulling out of the project and being replaced by Lewis Milestone who is credited as director of the picture. The film was heavily panned, and was considered a box office bomb, having lost over $6 million.

A replica of the Bounty was constructed for the film. Fifty years after the release of the film, the vessel sank in Hurricane Sandy with loss of life.

Plot

In the year 1787, the Bounty sets sail from Britain for Tahiti under the command of captain William Bligh (Trevor Howard). Her mission is to transport breadfruit to Jamaica, where hopefully it will thrive and provide a cheap source of food for the slaves.

The voyage gets off to a difficult start with the discovery that some cheese is missing. Bligh, the true pilferer, is accused of the theft by seaman John Mills (Richard Harris), and Bligh has Mills brutally flogged for showing contempt to his superior officer, to the disgust of his patrician second-in-command, 1st Lieutenant Fletcher Christian (Marlon Brando). The tone for the months to come is summarized by Bligh’s ominous pronouncement that “cruelty with a purpose is not cruelty, it is efficiency.” Aristocrat Christian is deeply offended by his ambitious captain.

Bligh attempts to reach Tahiti sooner by attempting the shorter westbound route around Cape Horn, a navigational nightmare. The strategy fails and the Bounty backtracks east, costing the mission much time. Singleminded Bligh attempts to make up the lost time by pushing the crew harder and cutting their rations.

When the Bounty reaches her destination, the crew revels in the easygoing life of the tropical paradise — and in the free-love philosophies of the Tahitian women. Christian himself is smitten with Maimiti (Tarita Teriipaia), daughter of the Tahitian king. Bligh’s agitation is further fueled by a dormancy period of the breadfruit: more months of delay until the plants can be transplanted. As departure day nears, three men, including seaman Mills, attempt to desert but are caught by Christian and clapped in irons by Bligh.

On the return voyage, Bligh attempts to bring back twice the number of breadfruit plants to atone for his tardiness, and must reduce the water rations of the crew to water the extra plants. One member of the crew falls from the rigging to his death while attempting to retrieve the drinking ladle. Another assaults Bligh over conditions on the ship and is fatally keelhauled. Mills taunts Christian after each death, trying to egg him on to challenge Bligh. When a crewman becomes gravely ill from drinking seawater, Christian attempts to give him fresh water in violation of the Captain’s orders. Bligh strikes Christian when he ignores his second order to stop. In response, Christian strikes Bligh. Bligh informs Christian that he will hang for his action when they reach port. With nothing left to lose, Christian takes command of the ship and sets Bligh and the loyalist members of the crew adrift in the longboat with navigational equipment, telling them to make for a local island. Bligh decides instead to cross much of the Pacific in order to reach British authorities sooner and arrives back in Britain with remarkable speed.

The military court exonerates Bligh of misdeed and recommends an expedition to arrest the mutineers and put them on trial, but also comes to the conclusion that the appointment of Bligh as captain of The Bounty was wrong. In the meantime, Christian sails back to Tahiti to pick up supplies and the girlfriends of the crew, then on to remote and wrongly charted Pitcairn Island to hide from the wrath of the Royal Navy. Once on Pitcairn, Christian decides that it is their duty to return to Britain and testify to Bligh’s wrongdoing and asks his men to sail with him. To prevent this possibility the men set the ship on fire and Christian is fatally burned while trying to save it. (In real life, Christian made the decision to set the ship on fire and died years later of another cause).


 

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