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Wuthering Heights – starring Lawrence Olivier

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Directed by William Wyler
Produced by Samuel Goldwyn
Written by Charles MacArthur
Ben Hecht
Based on Wuthering Heights
by Emily Brontë
Starring Merle Oberon
Laurence Olivier
David Niven
Geraldine Fitzgerald
Music by Alfred Newman
Cinematography Gregg Toland
Edited by Daniel Mandell
Production
company
Samuel Goldwyn Productions
Distributed by United Artists
Release dates
March 24, 1939
(Hollywood)[1]
April 13, 1939 (USA)
Running time
103 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Box office $624,643[2] (1989 re-issue)

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Wuthering Heights is a 1939 American film directed by William Wyler and produced by Samuel Goldwyn. It is based on the novel, Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë. The film depicts only sixteen of the novel’s thirty-four chapters, eliminating the second generation of characters. The novel was adapted for the screen by Charles MacArthur, Ben Hecht and John Huston. The film won the 1939 New York Film Critics Award for Best Film. It earned nominations for eight Academy Awards,[3] including for Best Picture and Best Actor in what many consider Hollywood’s greatest single year. The 1940 Academy Award for Best Cinematography, black-and-white category, was awarded to Gregg Toland for his work. Nominated for original score (but losing to The Wizard of Oz) was the prolific film composer, Alfred Newman, whose poignant “Cathy’s Theme” does so much “to maintain its life as a masterpiece of romantic filmmaking.” [4]

In 2007, Wuthering Heights was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Plot

Heathcliff (Laurence Olivier) and Cathy (Merle Oberon) meet on Peniston Crag in Wuthering Heights
A traveller named Lockwood (Miles Mander) is caught in the snow and stays at the estate of Wuthering Heights, despite the cold behaviour of his aged host, Heathcliff (Laurence Olivier). Late that night, after being shown into an upstairs room that was once a bridal chamber, Lockwood is awakened by a cold draft and finds the window shutter flapping back and forth. Just as he is about to close it, he feels an icy hand clutching his and sees a woman outside calling, “Heathcliff, let me in! I’m out on the moors. It’s Cathy!” Lockwood calls Heathcliff and tells him what he saw, whereupon the enraged Heathcliff throws him out of the room. As soon as Lockwood is gone, Heathcliff frantically calls out to Cathy, runs down the stairs and out of the house, into the snowstorm.

Ellen, the housekeeper (Flora Robson), tells the amazed Lockwood that he has seen the ghost of Cathy Earnshaw, Heathcliff’s great love, who died years before. When Lockwood says that he doesn’t believe in ghosts, Ellen tells him that he might if she told him the story of Cathy. And so the main plot begins as a long flashback.

The plot then flashes back 40 years. As a boy, Heathcliff is found on the streets by Mr. Earnshaw (Cecil Kellaway), who brings him home to live with his two children, Cathy and Hindley. At first reluctant, Cathy eventually welcomes Heathcliff and they become very close, but Hindley treats him as an outcast, especially after Mr. Earnshaw dies. About ten years later, the now-grown Heathcliff and Cathy (Merle Oberon) have fallen in love and are meeting secretly on Peniston Crag (because of censorship, their relationship in the film is kept strictly platonic in spite of the fact that they do kiss, while in the novel it is implied that their relationship was romantic). Hindley (Hugh Williams) has become dissolute and tyrannical and hates Heathcliff. One night, as Cathy and Heathcliff are out together, they hear music and realize that their neighbors, the Lintons, are giving a party. Cathy and Heathcliff sneak to the Lintons and climb over their garden wall, but the dogs are alerted and Cathy is injured. Heathcliff is forced to leave Cathy in their care. Enraged that Cathy would be so entranced by the Linton’s glamor and wealth, he blames them for her injury and curses them.

Months later, Cathy is fully recuperated but still living at the Lintons. Edgar Linton (David Niven) has fallen in love with Cathy and soon proposes, and after Edgar takes her back to Wuthering Heights, she tells Ellen what has happened. Ellen reminds her about Heathcliff, but Cathy flippantly remarks that it would degrade her to marry him. Heathcliff overhears and leaves. Cathy realizes that Heathcliff has overheard, is overcome by guilt and runs out after him into a raging storm. Edgar finds her and nurses her back to health once again, and soon he and Cathy marry.

Heathcliff (Laurence Olivier) at the deathbed of Cathy (Merle Oberon) in Wuthering Heights
Heathcliff was thought to have disappeared forever but returns two years later, now wealthy and elegant. He has refined his appearance and manners in order to both impress and spite Cathy and secretly buys Wuthering Heights from Hindley, who has become an alcoholic. In order to further spite Cathy, Heathcliff begins courting Edgar’s naive sister, Isabella (Geraldine Fitzgerald), and eventually marries her. The brokenhearted Cathy soon falls gravely ill. Heathcliff rushes to her side against the wishes of the now disillusioned and bitter Isabella, and Cathy dies in Heathcliff’s arms.

The flashback ends and we return to Ellen finishing her story. The family doctor, Dr. Kenneth (Donald Crisp), bursts in, saying that he (Dr. Kenneth) must be mad, having seen Heathcliff in the snow walking with his arm around a woman. Ellen exclaims, “It was Cathy!” and Dr. Kenneth says, “No, I don’t know who it was”, and tells them that he was then thrown from his horse. As he drew closer, he found Heathcliff lying in the snow. The woman had disappeared and there was no sign of her, and only Heathcliff’s footprints appeared in the snow, not hers. Lockwood asks, “Is he dead?”, and Dr. Kenneth nods, but Ellen says, “No, not dead, Dr. Kenneth. And not alone. He’s with her. They’ve only just begun to live.”

The last thing seen in the film are the ghosts of Heathcliff and Cathy, walking in the snow, superimposed over a shot of Peniston Crag.

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“Cabin in the Sky (1943)” 

Cabin in the Sky is a 1943 American musical film based on the 1940 stage musical of the same name. Directed by Vincente Minnelli, the film stars Ethel Waters and Rex Ingram, who reprised their roles from the Broadway production, as well Eddie ‘Rochester’ Anderson and Lena Horne. It was Horne’s first and only leading role in an MGM musical. Louis Armstrong was also featured in the film as one of Lucifer Junior’s minions, and Duke Ellington and his Orchestra have a showcase musical number in the film.

Plot summary

Little Joe, a man killed over gambling debts, is restored to life by angelic powers and given six months to redeem his soul and become worthy of entering Heaven—otherwise he will be condemned to Hell. Secretly guided by “The General” (the Lord’s Angel), Little Joe gives up his shiftless ways and becomes a hardworking, generous, and loving husband to his wife Petunia, whom he had previously neglected. Unfortunately, demon Lucifer Jr. (the son of Satan himself), is determined to drag Little Joe to Hell. Lucifer arranges for Joe to become wealthy by winning a lottery, reintroduces Joe to beautiful gold-digger Georgia Brown, and manipulates marital discord between Joe and Petunia. Little Joe abandons his wife for Georgia, and the two embark on a life of hedonistic pleasure. As Little Joe and Georgia celebrate at a nightclub one evening, Petunia joins them, determined to win Joe back. Little Joe fights with Domino for Petunia and she prays for God to destroy the nightclub. A cyclone appears and leaves the nightclub in ruins, as Joe and Petunia lie dead in the ruins after being shot by Domino. Just as it appears that Joe’s soul is lost forever, the angelic General informs him that Georgia Brown was so affected by the tragedy that she has donated all the money that he had given her to the church. On this technicality, Little Joe is allowed to go to Heaven with Petunia. As the two climb the Celestial Stairs, Joe suddenly wakes in his own bed. Joe had not been killed in the initial gambling-debt fracas, only wounded. All his supposed dealings with angels and demons were only a fever dream. Now genuinely reformed, Little Joe begins a new, happy life with his loving Petunia.

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“Kathy Young & The Innocents – A Thousand Stars – 1960”

“Kathy Young & The Innocents – A Thousand Stars – 1960”

Kathy Young (born October 21, 1945) is an American musician; she was a teen pop singer during the early 1960s, whose rendition of “A Thousand Stars”, at age 15, rose to No. 3 on Billboard Hot 100.

A native of Southern California, Young was born in the Orange County seat, Santa Ana. She rose to stardom in 1960, when producer Jim Lee of Indigo Records chose a Sun Valley-based band, The Innocents, to sing back-up vocals for her on a cover version of The Rivileers’ 1954 recording of “A Thousand Stars”. Two years earlier Lee had organized The Innocents for an appearance on Wink Martindale’s pop music TV show.

In December 1960, two months after her 15th birthday, Kathy Young and The Innocents peaked at No. 6 on the R&B Singles chart, and at No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100.[1][2][3][4] Young’s follow-up, “Happy Birthday Blues”, peaked at No. 30 on the Hot 100 in 1961.[1] Subsequent singles, such as “Magic Is the Night” and “The Great Pretender”, failed to chart in the Top 40.

In July 1961 she appeared on DJ Alan Freed’s highly publicized American road show.[5]

In 1962 she followed Jim Lee to Monogram Records, recording solo and with Chicano rock singer Chris Montez. Still a teenager, she saw her promising career slowing to a standstill and, in 1964, traveled to London. There she married American singer-songwriter John Maus, aka John Walker, founder of The Walker Brothers. Her marriage to Maus lasted from 1965 to 1968.[6]

Kathy returned to the US in 1969, remarrying two years later. Over the next 20 years she raised children and helped manage the family citrus ranch in Central California. Following a move back to Los Angeles in 1994, she began working for a major international company, while also returning to her original passion, music.

In the 2000s she performed at numerous rock shows at venues such as the Greek Theatre in Los Angeles and New Jersey’s Izod Center at the Meadowlands Sports Complex.[7][8]

Kathy Young was inducted into the Doo-Wop Hall of Fame, presided over by Harvey Robbins. on October 12, 2014. at the North Shore Music Theater, in Beverly, Massachusetts.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
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“OUR TOWN (FILM ADAPTION)-starring William Holden and Martha Scott

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Our Town is a 1940 American drama romance film adaptation of a play of the same name by Thornton Wilder starring Martha Scott as Emily Webb, and William Holden as George Gibbs. The cast also included Fay Bainter, Beulah Bondi, Thomas Mitchell, Guy Kibbee and Frank Craven. It was adapted by Harry Chandlee, Craven and Wilder, and directed by Sam Wood.

The film was a faithful reproduction of the play except for two significant changes: the film used scenery, whereas the play had not; the events of the third act, which in the play revolve around the death of one of the main characters, were turned into a dream from which Emily awakens — she is then able to resume a normal life. Producer Sol Lesser worked with Wilder in creating these changes.

A radio adaptation of the film on Lux Radio Theater on May 6, 1940, used the altered film ending.

The U.S. copyright of the film was not renewed after its first term expired in 1968. However, because it is a derivative work from a play that is still under U.S. copyright, it is not deemed to be in the public domain.[citation needed]

Our Town was first performed at McCarter Theatre in Princeton, New Jersey in 1938.[1] It later went on to success on Broadway and won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. It remains popular today and revivals are frequent.

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Synopsis-
Act I: Daily Life
The Stage Manager introduces the audience to the small town of Grover’s Corners, New Hampshire, and the people living there as a morning begins in the year 1901. Professor Willard speaks to the audience about the history of the town. Joe Crowell delivers the paper to Doc Gibbs, Howie Newsome delivers the milk, and the Webb and Gibbs households send their children (Emily and George, respectively) off to school on this beautifully simple morning.

Act II: Love and Marriage
Three years have passed, and George and Emily prepare to wed. The day is filled with stress. Howie Newsome is delivering milk in the pouring rain while Si Crowell, younger brother of Joe, laments how George’s baseball talents will be squandered. George pays an awkward visit to his soon-to-be in-laws. Here, the Stage Manager interrupts the scene and takes the audience back a year, to the end of Emily and George’s junior year. Emily confronts George about his pride, and over an ice cream soda, they discuss the future and their love for each other. George resolves not to go to college, as he had planned, but to work and eventually take over his uncle’s farm. In the present, George and Emily say that they are not ready to marry—George to his mother, Emily to her father—but they both calm down and happily go through with the wedding.

Act III: Death and Dying
Nine years have passed. The Stage Manager opens the act with a lengthy monologue emphasizing eternity, bringing the audience’s attention to the cemetery outside of town and the characters who have died since the wedding, including Mrs. Gibbs (pneumonia, while traveling), Wally Webb (burst appendix, while camping), Mrs. Soames, and Simon Stimson (suicide by hanging). Town undertaker Joe Stoddard is introduced, as is a young man named Sam Craig who has returned to Grover’s Corners for his cousin’s funeral. That cousin is Emily, who died giving birth to her and George’s second child. Once the funeral ends, Emily emerges to join the dead; Mrs. Gibbs urges her to forget her life, but she refuses. Ignoring the warnings of Simon, Mrs. Soames, and Mrs. Gibbs, Emily returns to Earth to relive one day, her 12th birthday. The memory proves too painful for her, and she realizes that every moment of life should be treasured. When she asks the Stage Manager if anyone truly understands the value of life while they live it, he responds, “No. The saints and poets, maybe—they do some.” Emily returns to her grave next to Mrs. Gibbs and watches impassively as George kneels weeping over her. The Stage Manager concludes the play and wishes the audience a good night.

Characters
Stage Manager – a narrator, commentator, and guide through Grover’s Corners. He joins in the action of the play periodically, as the minister at the wedding, the soda shop owner, a local townsmen, etc., and speaks directly to Emily after her death.
Emily Webb – one of the main characters; we follow her from a precocious young girl through her wedding to George Gibbs and her early death.
George Gibbs – the other main character; the boy next door, a kind but irresponsible teenager who matures over time and becomes a responsible husband, father and farmer.
Frank Gibbs – George’s father, the town doctor
Julia (Hersey) Gibbs – George’s mother. She dreams of going to Paris, but doesn’t get there. She saved $350 for the trip from the sale of an antique furniture piece, but ultimately willed it to George and Emily. Dies while visiting her daughter in Ohio.
Charles Webb – Emily’s father, editor of the Grover’s Corners Sentinel
Myrtle Webb – Emily’s mother

Secondary characters
Joe and Si Crowell – local paperboys. Joe’s intelligence earns him a full scholarship to MIT where he graduates at the top of his class. His promise will be cut short on the fields of France during World War I, according to the Stage Manager. Both he and his brother Si hold marriage in high disdain.
Simon Stimson – the choir director and church organist. We never learn the specific cause of his alcoholism and suicide, although Dr. Gibbs observes that “He’s seen a pick of troubles.” He remains bitter and cynical even beyond the grave.
Howie Newsome – the milkman, a fixture of Grover’s Corners.
Rebecca Gibbs – George’s younger sister. Later elopes with a traveling salesman and settles in Ohio.
Wally Webb – Emily’s younger brother. Dies of a burst appendix on a Boy Scout camping trip.
Professor Willard – a rather long-winded lecturer
Woman in Auditorium – concerned with temperance
Man in Auditorium – concerned with social justice
Another Woman in Auditorium – concerned with culture and beauty
Mrs. Louella Soames – a gossipy townswoman and member of the choir
Constable Bill Warren – the policeman
Two Baseball Players – who mock George at the wedding
Joe Stoddard – the undertaker
Sam Craig – a nephew of Mrs Gibbs who left town to seek his fortune. He came back after 12 years in Buffalo for Emily’s funeral.
Dead Man
Dead Woman
Mr. Carter
Farmer McCarty
Bessie – Howie Newsome’s horse (visible to the characters, but not the audience)

Composition
Wilder wrote the play while in his 30s. In June 1937, he lived in the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, one of the many locations where he worked on the play. It is believed he drafted the entire third act during a visit to Zürich in September 1937, in one day after a long evening walk in the rain with a friend, author Samuel Morris Steward.[2]

Setting
The play is set in the actual theatre where the play is being performed, but the year is always 1938. The Stage Manager of the 1938 production introduces the play-within-the-play which is set in the fictional community of Grover’s Corners, New Hampshire. The Stage Manager gives the coordinates of Grover’s Corners as 42°40′ north latitude and 70°37′ west longitude (those coordinates are actually in Massachusetts, about a thousand feet off the coast of Rockport).

Style
Wilder was dissatisfied with the theatre of his time: “I felt that something had gone wrong….I began to feel that the theatre was not only inadequate, it was evasive.”[3] His response was to use a metatheatrical style. Our Town’s narrator, the Stage Manager, is completely aware of his relationship with the audience, leaving him free to break the fourth wall and address them directly. According to the script, the play is to be performed with little scenery, no set and minimal props. The characters mime the objects with which they interact. Their surroundings are created only with chairs, tables, staircases, and ladders. For example, the scene in which Emily helps George with his evening homework, conversing through upstairs windows, is performed with the two actors standing atop separate ladders to represent their neighboring houses. Wilder once said: “Our claim, our hope, our despair are in the mind—not in things, not in ‘scenery.’ “[4]

Wilder called Our Town his favorite out of all his works, but complained that it was rarely done right, insisting that it “should be performed without sentimentality or ponderousness–simply, dryly, and sincerely.”[citation needed]

Production history
Our Town was first performed at McCarter Theater in Princeton, New Jersey on January 22, 1938. It next opened at the Wilbur Theatre in Boston, Massachusetts on January 25, 1938. Its New York City debut was on February 4, 1938 at Henry Miller’s Theatre, and later moved to the Morosco Theatre; this production was produced and directed by Jed Harris.[5] Wilder received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1938 for the work.[6]

In 1946, the Soviet Union prevented a production of Our Town in the Russian sector of occupied Berlin “on the grounds that the drama is too depressing and could inspire a German suicide wave.”[7]

em.m.wikipedia.org

Awards
1938 Pulitzer Prize for Drama
1989 Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Revival
1989 Tony Award for Best Revival

 
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 “Titanic (1953)” 

 “Titanic (1953)” 

Titanic is a 1953 American drama film directed by Jean Negulesco. Its plot centers on an estranged couple sailing on the ill-fated maiden voyage of the RMS Titanic, which took place in April 1912.

At the last minute, a wealthy American expatriate in Europe, Richard Sturges (Clifton Webb), buys a steerage-class ticket for the maiden voyage of the RMS Titanic from a Basque immigrant. Once aboard he seeks out his runaway wife, Julia (Barbara Stanwyck). He discovers she is trying to take their two unsuspecting children, 18-year-old Annette (Audrey Dalton) and ten-year-old Norman (Harper Carter), to her hometown of Mackinac, Michigan, to raise as down-to-earth Americans rather than rootless elitists like Richard himself.

As the ship prepares for departure, her captain, E. J. Smith (Brian Aherne), receives a hint from the shipping company representative that a record-setting speedy passage would be welcomed.

Other passengers include a wealthy woman of a working-class origin (based on a real-life Titanic survivor Molly Brown), Maude Young (Thelma Ritter); social-climbing Earl Meeker (Allyn Joslyn); a 20-year-old Purdue Universitytennis player, Gifford “Giff” Rogers (Robert Wagner); and George S. Healey (Richard Basehart), a Catholic priest who has been defrocked for alcoholism.

When Annette learns her mother’s intentions, she insists on returning to Europe with her father on the next ship as soon as they reach America. Julia concedes that her daughter is old enough to make her own decisions, but she insists on keeping custody of Norman. This angers Richard, forcing Julia to reveal that Norman is not his child, but rather the result of a one-night stand after one of their many bitter arguments. Upon hearing that, he agrees to give up all claim to Norman. Richard joins Maude, Earl, and George Widener in the lounge to play contract bridge with them. The next morning, when Norman reminds Richard about a shuffleboard game they had scheduled, Richard coldly brushes him off.

Meanwhile Giff falls for Annette at first glance. At first she repulses his brash attempts to become better acquainted, but eventually she warms to him. That night, Giff, Annette and a group of young people sing and play the piano in the dining room, while Captain Smith watches from a corner table.

Second Officer Lightoller (uncredited Edmund Purdom) expresses his concern to Captain Smith about the ship’s speed when they receive two messages from other ships warning of iceberg sightings near their route. Smith, however, assures him that there is no danger.

That night, however, a lookout spots an iceberg dead ahead. Although the crew tries to steer clear of danger, the ship is gashed below the waterline and begins taking on water. When Richard finds the captain, he insists on being told the truth: the ship is doomed. He tells his family to dress warmly but properly; then they head outside. Richard and Julia have a tearful reconciliation on the boat deck, as he places Julia and the children into a lifeboat. Unnoticed by Julia, Norman gives up his seat to an older woman and goes looking for his nominal father. When one of the lines becomes tangled, preventing the lifeboat from being lowered, Giff climbs down and fixes the problem, only to lose his grip and fall into the water. His unconscious body is dragged into the boat.

Meeker disguises himself as a woman to get aboard a lifeboat but Maude Young notices his shoes and unmasks him in front of the others in the lifeboat. At the other end of the spectrum of courage and unselfishness, George Healey heads down into one of the boiler rooms to comfort trapped crewmen.

As the Titanic is in her final moments, Norman and Richard find each other. Richard tells a passing steward that Norman is his “son” and then tells the boy that he has been proud of him every day of his life. Then they join the rest of the doomed passengers and the crew in singing the hymn “Nearer, My God, to Thee“. As the last boiler explodes, the Titanics bow plunges, pivoting her stern high into the air while the ship rapidly slides into the icy water. The remaining survivors are last seen waiting in the lifeboats for help to come as dawn approaches.

Wikipedia.org

 
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A Tribute to Charlie Chaplin

A Tribute to Charlie Chaplin

The Rink – Charlie Chaplin (Funny Silent Comedy Film – 1916)

When I think of silent film actors and the precarious improvisations used in their performances, it is a fact that they were unraveling complexities of a forthcoming comic era. Silent film actors as Charlie Chaplin, should be considered originators and Kings of comedy.

Before the “Talkies” (motion pictures with sound), imagination was the bond between the talent and the audience. This interplay of imagination is so funny because anything and almost everything was used to conjure sounds and express emotions. Yes, creating realities was very humorous with lots of weird sounds. Charlie Chaplin was a brilliant comic performer as we will view in his film below.-AmericaOnCoffee-
The Rink, a silent film from 1916, was Charlie Chaplin’s eighth film for Mutual Films. The film co-starred Edna Purviance, Eric Campbell, Henry Bergman, and Albert Austin, and is best known for showcasing Chaplin’s roller skating skills.

After amusements working in a restaurant, Charlie uses his lunch break to go roller skating.

Director : Charles Chaplin, Edward Brewer (technical director)
Producer : Henry P. Caulfield
Starring : Charles Chaplin, Edna Purviance, Eric Campbell, Henry Bergman, Albert Austin
Release dates : December 4, 1916
Language : Silent

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Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin KBE (16 April 1889 – 25 December 1977) was an English comic actor, filmmaker, and composer who rose to fame in the era of silent film. Chaplin became a worldwide icon through his screen persona “the Tramp” and is considered one of the most important figures in the history of the film industry. His career spanned more than 75 years, from childhood in the Victorian era until a year before his death in 1977, and encompassed both adulation and controversy.Wikipedia-

 
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 “Hunchback of Notre Dame, The – Trailer (1939)” 

Charles Laughton

    William Dieterle
    Produced by Pandro S. Berman
    Screenplay by Sonya Levien
    Bruno Frank (adaptation)
    Based on The Hunchback of Notre-Dame by Victor Hugo
    Starring Charles Laughton
    Sir Cedric Hardwicke
    Thomas Mitchell
    Maureen O’Hara
    Edmond O’Brien
    Alan Marshal
    Walter Hampden
    Music by Alfred Newman
    (musical adaptation and original composition)
    Cinematography Joseph H. August A.S.C.
    Edited by William Hamilton
    Robert Wise
    Distributed by RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
    Release dates
    December 29, 1939
    [1]
    Running time
    116 minutes
    Country United States
    Language English
    Budget $1,826,000[2]
    Box office $3,155,000[2]The Hunchback of Notre Dame is a 1939 American film starring Charles Laughton as Quasimodo and Maureen O’Hara as Esmeralda.[3][4] Directed by William Dieterle and produced by Pandro S. Berman, the film was based on Victor Hugo’s novel of the same name.For this production RKO Radio Pictures built on their movie ranch a massive medieval city of Paris and Notre Dame Cathedral, one of the largest and most extravagant sets ever constructed.

    Plot
    Prologue
    “With the end of the 15th century, the Middle Ages came to a close. Europe began to see great changes. France, ravaged by a hundred years of War, at last found peace. The people under Louis XI felt free to hope again ~ to dream of progress. But superstition and prejudice often stood in the way, seeking to crush the adventurous spirit of man.”Synopsis
    The film opens with Louis XI, the King of France, and Jean Frollo, the King’s Chief Justice of Paris, visiting a printing shop. Frollo is determined to do everything in his power to rid Paris of anything he sees as evil, including the printing press and gypsies, who at the time are persecuted and prohibited from entering Paris. That day is Paris’ annual celebration, the Festival of Fools. Esmeralda, a young gypsy girl, is seen dancing in front of an audience of people. Quasimodo, the hunchback and bell ringer of Notre Dame Cathedral, is crowned the King of Fools until Frollo catches up to him and takes him back to the church.Esmeralda is caught by guards for entering Paris without a permit and is being chased after until she seeks safety in Notre Dame, to which Claude, the Archbishop of Paris and Jean’s brother, protects her. She prays to the Virgin Mary to help her fellow gypsies only to be confronted by Jean Frollo, who accuses her of being a heathen. Afterwards, she asks King Louis to help her people, to which he agrees. Frollo then takes her up to the bell tower where they encounter Quasimodo, whom she is frightened of. She tries to run away from the hunchback until he catches up to her and physically carries her away. Pierre Gringoire, a poor street poet, witnesses all this, and calls out to Captain Phoebus and his guards, who capture Quasimodo just in time. Esmeralda is then saved and starts falling in love with Phoebus. Gringoire later trespasses the Court of Miracles but is saved by Esmeralda from hanging by marrying him.The next day, Quasimodo is sentenced to be lashed in the square and publicly humiliated afterwards. Frollo, seeing this, realizes that he can’t stop the sentence because it already happened, and abandons him instead. However, Esmeralda arrives and gives him water, and this awakens Quasimodo’s love for her.

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    Maureen O’Hara as Esmeralda
    Later that night, Esmeralda is invited by the nobles to their party. Frollo shows up to the party, where he confesses to Esmeralda his lust for her. Afterwards, she dances in front of the nobles and moves away from the crowd with Phoebus to a garden where they share a moment between each other. Frollo then kills Phoebus out of jealousy, and Esmeralda is wrongly accused of his death. Afterwards, Gringoire visits Esmeralda in her prison cell to console her. Frollo confesses the crime to his brother, and intends to sentence Esmeralda to death for it (which he does), saying that she has “bewitched” him. After Esmeralda is about to be hanged in the gallows, Quasimodo saves her by taking her to the cathedral.

      Gringoire and Clopin realize that the nobles are planning to revoke Notre Dame’s right of sanctuary, they both try different methods in order to save Esmeralda from hanging. Gringoire writes a pamphlet that will prevent this from happening, and Clopin leads the beggars to storm the cathedral. Frollo confesses his crime to King Louis, to which Louis orders Olivier to arrest him. Afterwards, the King talks to Gringoire after reading his pamphlet. Meanwhile, Quasimodo and the guards of Paris fight off Clopin and the beggars. Afterwards, he sees Frollo in the bell tower seeking to harm Esmeralda, and throws him off the cathedral top. Later that morning, Esmeralda is pardoned and freed from hanging, and her Gypsy people are also finally freed. Then, she leaves with Gringoire and a huge crowd out of the public square. The film makes it clear that in the end Esmeralda truly loves Gringoire. Quasimodo sees all this from high on the cathedral and says sadly, to a gargoyle, “Why was I not made of stone, like thee?”, and the film ends.

        en.m.Wikipedia.org

             
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            Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-08-20T09:24:31+00:00America/New_York08bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 20 Aug 2018 09:24:31 +0000 31, in classic film star, classic movies, nostalgic

             

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