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Category Archives: classic television

 “The Untouchables – 1959 – TV Series – ABC” 

Genre Crime drama

Starring Robert Stack

Abel Fernandez

Nicholas Georgiade

Paul Picerni

Steve London

Bruce Gordon

Neville Brand

Narrated by Walter Winchell

Theme music composer Nelson Riddle

Composer(s) Bill Loose

Jack Cookerly

Nelson Riddle

Country of origin United States

Original language(s) English

No. of seasons 4

No. of episodes 118 & two-part pilot (list of episodes)

Production

Executive producer(s) Alan A. Armer

Desi Arnaz

Leonard Freeman

Quinn Martin

Jerry Thorpe

Producer(s) Alan A. Armer

Alvin Cooperman

Walter Grauman

Bert Granet

Paul Harrison

Herman Hoffman

Sidney Marshall

Vincent McEveety

Del Reisman

Norman Retchin

Lloyd Richards

Stuart Rosenberg

Charles Russell

Josef Shaftel

Cinematography Robert B. Hauser

Glen MacWilliams

Charles Straumer

Camera setup Single-camera

Running time 50 minutes

Production company(s) Desilu Productions

Langford Productions

Distributor Desilu Sales (until 1967)

Paramount Domestic Television (1967–2006)

CBS Paramount Domestic Television (2006–2007)

CBS Television Distribution (2007– )

Release

Original network ABC

Picture format Black-and-white

Audio format Monaural

Original release October 15, 1959 – May 21, 1963


The Untouchables is an American crime drama that ran from 1959 to 1963 on the ABC Television Network, produced by Desilu Productions. Based on the memoir of the same name by Eliot Ness and Oscar Fraley, it fictionalized Ness’ experiences as a Prohibition agent, fighting crime in Chicago in the 1930s with the help of a special team of agents handpicked for their courage, moral character, and incorruptibility, nicknamed the Untouchables. The book was later made into a film in 1987 (also called The Untouchables) by Brian De Palma, with a script by David Mamet, and a second, less-successful TV series in 1993.

A powerful, dynamic, hard-hitting action drama, and a landmark crime series,[1] The Untouchables won series star Robert Stack an Emmy Award for Best Actor in a Dramatic Series in 1960.[2]
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“P.S. I LOVE YOU – 1963”

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The Classics were an American vocal group formed in 1958 in Brooklyn.

The Classics first sang together in high school; two of them had previously sung in a group called The Del-Rays. In 1959, under the auspices of manager Jim Gribble, they recorded their first single, “Cinderella”; the record Bubbled Under the US Hot 100 in early 1960. The follow-up, “Angel Angela”, also narrowly missed the national charts, and the 1961 single “Life Is But a Dream” hit the lower regions of the Black Singles chart when Mercury Records picked it up for national distribution, but it wasn’t until they released the single “Blue Moon” with Herb Lance on lead vocals that they charted a hit. The song peaked at #50.

The group signed with Musicnote Records in 1963 and released “Till Then”, which became their biggest hit, peaking at #20 on the pop charts and #7 AC.

The group was best remembered for its ballads, and frequently sang versions of pop standards from the 1920s and 1930s. They frequently changed labels over the course of their career, and parted ways about 1966. Member Emil Stucchio revived the name to tour in the 1970s and again in the 1990s and 2000s.In the 1990s, the group was Stuccio, former Mystic Al Contrera, Scott LaChance, and Michael Paquette.Later it was Stuccio, Contrera, LaChance, and Teresa McClean. LaChance later left the group.

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“The Fugitive (Season 4 Episode 28) – The Shattered Silence” 




The Fugitive is an American drama series created by Roy Huggins. It was produced by QM Productions and United Artists Television. It aired on ABC from 1963 to 1967. David Janssen starred as Richard Kimble, a physician who is falsely convicted of his wife’s murder and sentenced to receive the death penalty. En route to death row, Kimble’s train derails over a switch, allowing him to escape and begin a cross-country search for the real killer, a “one-armed man” (played by Bill Raisch). At the same time, Dr. Kimble is hounded by the authorities, most notably by Police Lieutenant Philip Gerard (Barry Morse).

The Fugitive aired for four seasons, and a total of 120 51-minute episodes were produced. The first three seasons were filmed in black and white; the final season was in color.[1]

The Fugitive was nominated for five Emmy Awards and won the Emmy for Outstanding Dramatic Series in 1966.[2]In 2002, it was ranked No. 36 on TV Guide’s 50 Greatest TV Shows of All TimeTV Guide named the one-armed man No. 5 in their 2013 list of The 60 Nastiest Villains of All Time.

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“Honey West – TV Series” 

“Honey West – TV Series” 

Featured Photo credit by loopy dave/deviantart


Honey West is an American crime drama television series that aired on ABC during the 1965–1966 television season. Based upon a series of novels that had launched in 1957, the series starred Anne Francis as female private detective Honey West and John Ericson as her partner, Sam Bolt.

As in the Burke’s Law episode introducing her, West has a partner and man-Friday, Sam Bolt (John Ericson), who communicates with Honey via a radio hidden in her lipstick case. In the television series, she keeps an exotic pet ocelot named Bruce. (In “The Fun-Fun Killer”, which originally aired on March 4, 1966, the African series Daktari is showing on Honey’s TV, and Honey asks, “Oh Bruce, why do we always have to watch your show?”)

Honey’s alluring feline qualities were reflected in her animal-print wardrobe and apartment decor. For sneaking around at night and engaging in energetic fight scenes, she wears a black fabric bodystocking reminiscent of Emma Peel’s leather jumpsuit. Like Peel’s Lotus Elan sports car, Honey’s similar-looking AC Cobra convertible emphasized her independence and vitality. Although the racy content of the novels was excised for television, West often went on solo undercover missions that required a provocative or revealing outfit.

She uses a number of James Bond-like gimmicks: a high-tech surveillance van, an exploding compact, a garter-belt gas mask, and tear-gas earrings. West is a black-belt in Judo, as is Sam, who is an ex-Marine.

Some episodes of this series, including the final one, were scripted by Richard Levinson and William Link, who would later be affiliated with such noted series as Columbo and Murder, She Wrote.

 

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The Real Mccoys Season 1 Episode 16 Luke’s Mother in Law

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The Real McCoys revolves around the lives of a family from the Appalachian Mountains who originally hailed from fictional Smokey Corners, West Virginia. The McCoys moved to California and became dirt farmers. The family consisted of Grandpa Amos McCoy (Walter Brennan); his grandson Luke (Richard Crenna), Luke’s new bride Kate (Kathy Nolan), Luke’s teenage sister Tallahassie “Hassie” (Lydia Reed), and his 11-year-old brother Little Luke (Michael Winkelman). The double-naming of the brothers was explained in the first episode by the elder Luke: Because their parents were so excited over the birth of the younger boy, “they forgot all about me!” Only Crenna was in every episode.

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The McCoys’ farm had previously been owned by an uncle, Ben McCoy, who died. The former West Virginians joined the Grange farm association and acquired a Mexican farm hand named Pepino Garcia, played by the Puerto Rican-born Tony Martinez. In the episode which aired on January 8, 1962, Pepino becomes an American citizen and takes the surname “McCoy”. The McMichaels, a brother and sister combination played by Andy Clyde and Madge Blake in twenty-nine and twenty-one episodes, respectively, lived on the hill not far from the McCoys. Amos McCoy and George McMichael, both rather devious individuals, would sometimes quarrel, particularly over their games of checkers and horseshoes. Kate was friendly with the much older Flora McMichael, George’s sister, and became involved with life in the community. Though still in her twenties, Kate served as a mother figure for Luke’s younger siblings, Hassie and Little Luke, and one episode shows her bewilderment in trying to entice the children to take responsibility for their school studies. Many episodes have a moral theme consistent with the conservative views of Walter Brennan, such as two 1957 segments entitled “You Can’t Cheat an Honest Man” with Joseph Kearns, later of Dennis the Menace, and “Gambling Is a Sin,” in which Amos allows a casino to advertise on McCoy property before the ethics of the matter is brought to his attention.[1] Other such episodes are “Go Fight City Hall”, “The Taxman Cometh,” “You Can’t Always Be a Hero”, “You Never Get Too Old,” “Where There’s a Will”, “Beware a Smart Woman”, “Money in the Bank”, “How to Win Friends,” “You’re As Young As You Feel”, “Honesty Is the Best Policy”, and “Never a Lender Be”.[2]

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One of the most remembered episodes, “The New Well” (October 30, 1958), pits science against folklore when Grandpa’s divining rod proves superior to the paid recommendation of a geologist, played by Joe Flynn, in locating a new water source on the farm.[3] In the 1958 episode “It Pays to Be Poor”, John Dehner plays Roger Brewster, a hard-edged New York City businessman determined to buy the McCoy farm to turn it into a motel, but spurred by his kindly wife (Dorothy Green), he soon develops an unexpected taste for the basic values of rural living.[4]

In “Little Luke’s Education” (February 6, 1958), Amos confronts bigotry among the local children against hillbilly peoples such as the McCoys. In “Grampa’s Private War” (February 12, 1959), Amos gets so carried away with patriotic fervor that he claims to have fought under Theodore Roosevelt in the Spanish–American War, but Walter Brennan was four years old when that war was fought in 1898. Then Amos is invited to speak at a Veterans Day ceremony.[2]

Jon Lormer was cast seven times on The Real McCoys in 1959 and 1960, six as the character Sam Watkins. Joan Blondell appeared three times near the end of the series as Aunt Win. Marjorie Bennett was cast three times as Amanda Comstock. Pat Buttram and Howard McNear also appeared three times; they were subsequently cast as Eustace Haney on CBS’s Green Acres and as Floyd the Barber on CBS’s The Andy Griffith Show. Olin Howland and Willard Waterman appeared five times each as Charley Perkins and Mac Maginnis, respectively.[2]

Early in the run of the series, Charles Lane, who often appeared in a character role on I Love Lucy, was cast twice as Harry Poulson, a fast-talking egg salesman; Hassie McCoy has an interest in Harry’s son. In 1963, Jack Oakie appeared three times in the role of Uncle Rightly. Dick Elliott was cast twice as Doc Thornton, and Lurene Tuttle appeared twice as Gladys Purvis, the widowed mother of series character Kate McCoy, with Jay Novello in one of those appearances as Gladys’ intended second husband, a retired photographer from Fresno, California.[2]

Malcolm Cassell appeared several times as Hassie McCoy’s boyfriend, Tommy. Edward Everett Horton played J. Luther Medwick, the grandfather of Hassie’s other boyfriend, Jerry; Medwick and Amos soon clash. Verna Felton, a member of the December Bride cast, appeared once as Cousin Naomi Vesper. Jesse White, known as the Maytag repairman in the television commercial and subsequently a cast member of CBS’s The Ann Sothern Show, portrayed a used car salesman named “San Fernando Harry” who clashes with Amos McCoy in “The New Car” (October 2, 1958). On June 1, 1961, Amos, Luke, and Kate return to West Virginia for the 100th birthday gathering of “Grandmother McCoy”, played by Jane Darwell. In one episode, Lee Van Cleef played a sentry; in another Tom Skerritt appeared as a letter carrier.[2]

The episode “The Tycoon” (August 30, 1960) four years later coincidentally became the title of Brennan’s next ABC sitcom, The Tycoon, with his co-star Van Williams.[2] Barbara Stanwyck made a cameo appearance in the 1959 episode, “The McCoys Go To Hollywood”, which also features Dorothy Provine, and a glimpse of the Desilu Studios, where the series was filmed. In 1961, Fay Wray is featured in the episode “Theatre in the Barn.” A star of many Hollywood films, including the 1933 adventure-horror classic King Kong, Wray in this episode appears as herself, who volunteers to direct a local amateur production to raise money for the Grange. Just before The Real McCoys ended its run on ABC, Nolan left the series in a contract dispute and was written out of the remaining scripts: her character of Kate apparently died. Hassie left home to attend college, and Little Luke joined the United States Army. She appeared only in the first episode of the final season—he never did. Amos McCoy did not appear in many episodes. Luke hence supposedly was a widower, and many of the stories revolved around Grandpa trying to find him a new wife. This nearly succeeded when Luke met Louise Howard, portrayed by Janet De Gore, a widow with a young son, Greg, played by Butch Patrick, later of CBS’s, The Munsters.

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“Rawhide Season 4 Full Episodes”  

Rawhide is an American Western TV series starring Eric Fleming and Clint Eastwood. The show aired for eight seasons on the CBS network on Friday nights, from January 9, 1959[1] to September 3, 1965, before moving to Tuesday nights from September 14, 1965 until January 4, 1966, with a total of 217 black-and-white episodes. The series was produced and sometimes directed by Charles Marquis Warren, who also produced early episodes of Gunsmoke.

Spanning seven and a half years, Rawhide was the sixth-longest-running American television Western, exceeded only by eight years of Wagon Train, nine years of The Virginian, fourteen years of Bonanza, eighteen years of Death Valley Days, and twenty years of Gunsmoke.

SynopsisEdit

Eric Fleming as Gil Favor

Clint Eastwood as Rowdy Yates

Set in the 1860s, Rawhide portrays the challenges faced by the drovers of a cattle drive. Most episodes are introduced with a monologue by Gil Favor (portrayed by Eric Fleming), the trail boss. In a typical Rawhide story, the drovers come upon people on the trail and are drawn into solving whatever problem they present or confront. Sometimes, one or more of the crew venture into a nearby town and encounter some trouble from which they need to be rescued. Rowdy Yates (Clint Eastwood) was young and at times impetuous in the earliest episodes and Favor had to keep a tight rein on him. Favor was a savvy and strong leader who always played “square” with his fellow men – a tough customer who could handle the challenges and get the job done. (Producer Charles Warren called on the diary written in 1866 by trail boss George C. Duffield[2] to shape the character of Favor.)[3] Although Favor had the respect and loyalty of the men who worked for him, a few times, the people, including Yates, were insubordinate under him after working too hard or after receiving a tongue lashing. Favor had to fight at times and usually won. Some of the stories were obviously easier in production terms, but the peak form of the show was convincing and naturalistic, and sometimes brutal. Its situations could range from parched plains to anthrax, ghostly riders to wolvescattle raiding, bandits, murderers, and so forth. A problem on such drives was the constant need for water, and the scout spent much of his time looking for it, sometimes finding that water holes and even rivers had dried up. In some ways, the show was similar to the TV series Wagon Train, which had debuted on NBC on September 18, 1957.

Eric Fleming postcard

The series was not afraid to face tough issues. Robert Culp played an ex-soldier on the drive who had become dangerously addicted to morphine. Mexican drover Jesús faced racism at times (from people outside of the crew). Anger was still left over from the Civil War which had ended only four years earlier, and the “Poco Tiempo” episode reveals that Rowdy’s father’s name was Dan, that Rowdy came from Southwestern Texas, and that he went off to war at 16 (being later held in a Union prison camp). Trail boss Favor had been a Confederate captain in the war. “Incident on The Edge of Madness” in season one, guest-starring Lon Chaney Jr., had Favor’s old commanding officer attempting to enlist the aid of Favor and his men to start the “New Confederacy of Panama” much to Favor’s dismay; in this episode Favor and Nolan were revealed to have been in the Confederate forces up on Marye’s Heights at the Battle of Fredericksburg, and “felt shamed” at having to gun down so many Union soldiers. Some American Indians demanded cattle as payment for going through their land. Rough characters were in the shows, and in one episode, Gil Favor was tortured by having his face held near a fire. In another, “Incident of The Town in Terror”, people thought a sick Rowdy Yates had “the plague” (anthrax) and guns were used to enforce quarantine of the cattle drovers outside the town. Also, cattle rustlers were around, including Commancheros.

The show could on occasions be eerily atmospheric. “Incident With an The Executioner” featured a mysterious dark rider (Dan Duryea) seen on the hillside following the herd, “Incident of The Haunted Hills” featured a sacred Indian burial ground, “Incident of The Druid Curse” and season two’s “Incident of The Murder Steer” (where anyone sighting a rogue steer with “Murder” carved on its side soon after dies, based on an actual legend of the Old West), plus episodes with ghost towns, cattle with horns lit up by St. Elmo’s fire at dusk, with cowboys struck by lightning, plus a strange totally enclosed gypsy wagon, apparently steering itself, repeatedly turning up, all stand out as curiously “spooky” tales for a bustling dusty cattle drive; the show’s often stark incidental music suited these stories perfectly.

Margaret O’Brien and Clint Eastwood

In episode 67, “Incident Near the Promised Land” (most episode titles began with “Incident” until Bruce Geller and Bernard L. Kowalski became the producers for season six), the cattle drive finally reached Sedalia (for the first time in the series). Unusually, episode 68 continues on from that, where the cattle have been sold and the men celebrate in town and decide on their futures with even Favor thinking of leaving the business. Instead of the usual ending, wherein Gil Favor gives the command “Head ’em up! Move ’em out!” and the cattle move off, this episode had the end titles over a view of a Sedalia street. Episode 69 has Gil Favor visiting his two daughters, Gillian and Maggie, who live with their aunt Eleanor Bradley in Philadelphia. In episode 70, a number of the men are back together and heading back to San Antonio about 650 miles away, with a herd of horses (used in the titles) instead of cattle. Episode 71 has a new cattle drive ready to go, but the owner of 1600 of the cattle wants to be in charge, so Favor reluctantly signs on as a ramrod, but after problems, Favor becomes boss again at the end of the show. These five episodes made up one storyline instead of the usual single-episode stories which could have been set anywhere in the West.

Favor had many bad moments in the series, but none worse than the “Lost Herd” episode wherein, close to drive’s finish, he wants to beat another herd to town to get the best prices. He takes a narrow shortcut; there is thunder and lightning, and the herd stampedes over the cliffs, leaving him just 9 out of 3000 cattle when the drive reaches town. He does not have the money to pay the drovers off and has to face the owner (Royal Dano) whose cattle he has lost, knowing that he might never work in the business again.

From the second season, episodes began to feature individual cast members, notably Clint Eastwood’s Rowdy Yates (sole star in “Incident on The Day of The Dead” which opens season two); later, both Scout Pete Nolan (Sheb Wooley) and even cook G. W. Wishbone (Paul Brinegar) were featured as leads, while Eric Fleming’s Gil Favor remained in overall charge.

Pete Nolan (Wooley), the scout, departs as a regular cast member after “The Deserter’s Patrol” (season four, episode 18, 9 Feb 1962), but returns for a single episode “Reunion” (episode 26, 6 April 1962), and for a further nine episodes in season seven from “Texas Fever” (episode 18, 5 February 1965).

Charles H. Gray‘s character Clay Forester, having played a villain in three episodes of season four (from “The Inside Man”, episode 6), then reforms and replaces Nolan as scout from “The Greedy Town” (season four, episode 19). Gray remained in the regular cast for the rest of seasons four and five (though in a number of later episodes he is credited but not seen). Clay Forrester reappeared later in “Incident of El Toro” in season six (episode 26, 9 April 1964).

John Ireland and Raymond St. Jacques, 1965

Two other minor semiregular cast members were “Toothless” (William R. Thompkins) in seasons five and six, plus one season-seven appearance (sometimes uncredited), and “Yo Yo” (Paul Comi), who makes six appearances in season seven.

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Rawhide Season 4 Full Episodes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLebWvRM0X2RjbjywTyaCPI-ZxL1TbWP5H

 

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“First Broadcast of CBS’s World News Roundup: March 13, 1938” 

 

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