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“Sunset Boulevard (1950) trailer”

“Sunset Boulevard (1950) trailer”

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Sunset Boulevard (stylized onscreen as SUNSET BLVD.) is a 1950 American black comedy/drama film noir[3] directed and co-written by Billy Wilder, and produced and co-written by Charles Brackett. It was named after the boulevard that runs through Los Angeles and Beverly Hills, California.

The film stars William Holden as Joe Gillis, an unsuccessful screenwriter, and Gloria Swanson as Norma Desmond, a faded silent movie star who draws him into her fantasy world where she dreams of making a triumphant return to the screen, with Erich von Stroheim as Max Von Mayerling, her devoted servant. Nancy Olson, Fred Clark, Lloyd Gough and Jack Webb play supporting roles. Director Cecil B. DeMille and gossip columnist Hedda Hopper play themselves, and the film includes cameo appearances by leading silent film actors Buster Keaton, H. B. Warner and Anna Q. Nilsson.

Praised by many critics when first released, Sunset Boulevard was nominated for eleven Academy Awards (including nominations in all four acting categories) and won three. It is widely accepted as a classic, often cited as one of the greatest films of American cinema. Deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” by the U.S. Library of Congress in 1989, Sunset Boulevard was included in the first group of films selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. In 1998, it was ranked number twelve on the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 best American films of the 20th century, and in 2007 it was 16th on their 10th Anniversary list.

Plot
At a Sunset Boulevard mansion, the body of Joe Gillis floats in the swimming pool. In a flashback, Joe relates the events leading to his death.

Six months earlier, down-on-his-luck screenwriter Joe tries selling Paramount Pictures producer Sheldrake on a story he submitted. Script reader Betty Schaefer harshly critiques it in Joe’s presence, unaware that he is the author. Later, while fleeing from repossession men seeking his car, Joe turns into the driveway of a seemingly deserted mansion. After concealing the car, he hears a woman calling him, apparently mistaking him for someone else. Ushered in by Max, her butler, Joe recognizes the woman as long-forgotten silent film star Norma Desmond. Learning he is a writer, she asks his opinion of a script she has written for a film about Salome. She plans to play the role herself in a comeback. Joe finds her script abysmal, but flatters her into hiring him as a script doctor.

Moved into Norma’s mansion at her insistence, Joe resents but gradually accepts his dependent situation. He sees that Norma refuses to face the fact that her fame has evaporated and learns the fan letters she still receives are secretly written by Max, who tells him Norma is subject to depression and has made suicide attempts.

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Norma lavishes attention on Joe and buys him expensive clothes. At her New Year’s Eve party, he discovers he is the only guest and realizes she has fallen in love with him. He tries to let her down gently, but she slaps him and retreats to her room.

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Joe visits his friend Artie Green to ask about staying at his place. At Artie’s party, he again meets Betty, who he learns is Artie’s girl. Betty thinks a scene in one of Joe’s scripts has potential, but Joe is uninterested. When Joe phones Max to have him pack his things, Max tells him Norma cut her wrists with his razor. Joe returns to Norma.

Norma has Max deliver the edited Salome script to her former director, Cecil B. DeMille, at Paramount. She starts getting calls from Paramount executive Gordon Cole, but petulantly refuses to speak to anyone except DeMille. Eventually, she has Max drive her and Joe to Paramount in her 1929 Isotta Fraschini.[4] The older studio employees warmly greet her. DeMille receives her affectionately and treats her with great respect, tactfully evading her questions about Salome. Meanwhile, Max learns that Cole merely wants to rent her unusual car for a film.

Preparing for her imagined comeback, Norma undergoes rigorous beauty treatments. Joe secretly works nights at Betty’s Paramount office, collaborating on an original screenplay. His moonlighting is found out by Max, who reveals that he was once a respected film director. He discovered Norma as a teenage girl, made her a star and was her first husband. After she divorced him, he found life without her unbearable and abandoned his career to become her servant.

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Although Betty is engaged to Artie, she and Joe fall in love. Norma discovers a manuscript with Joe’s and Betty’s names on it. She phones Betty and insinuates what sort of man Joe really is. Joe, overhearing, invites Betty to come see for herself. When she arrives, he pretends he is satisfied being a kept man, but after she tearfully leaves, he packs to return to his old Ohio newspaper job. He disregards Norma’s threat to kill herself and the gun she shows him to back it up. He bluntly tells her the public has forgotten her, there will be no comeback, and the fan letters are from Max. As Joe walks away, Norma shoots him three times. He falls into the pool.

The flashback ends. The house is filled with police and reporters. Norma, having lost touch with reality, believes the newsreel cameras are there to film Salome. Max and the police play along. Max sets up a scene for her and calls “Action!” As the cameras roll, Norma dramatically descends her grand staircase. She pauses and makes an impromptu speech about how happy she is to be making a film again, ending with: “All right, Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my close-up.”[5]

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Cast
William Holden as Joseph C. “Joe” Gillis
Gloria Swanson as Norma Desmond
Erich von Stroheim as Maximillian “Max” von Mayerling
Nancy Olson as Betty Schaefer
Fred Clark as Sheldrake, Paramount Producer
Lloyd Gough as Morino, Joe’s agent
Jack Webb as Arthur “Artie” Green
Franklyn Farnum as Undertaker
Larry J. Blake as Finance man #1
Charles Dayton as Finance man #2
As Themselves:

Cecil B. DeMille
Hedda Hopper
Buster Keaton (Bridge player)
Anna Q. Nilsson (Bridge player)
H. B. Warner (Bridge Player)
Ray Evans (Pianist at Artie’s party)
Jay Livingston (Pianist at Artie’s party)
Henry Wilcoxon as Actor (uncredited)

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“LOOK UP IN THE SKY!… IT’S A BIRD, IT’S A PLANE…IT’S SUPERMAN!”

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Faster than a speeding bullet,
More powerful than a locomotive,
Able to leap tall buildings in a single bound,

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The Adventures of Superman,

is an American television series based on comic book characters and concepts created in 1938 by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. The show was the first television series to feature Superman and began filming in 1951 in California on RKO-Pathé stages and the RKO Forty Acres back lot. It was sponsored by cereal manufacturer Kellogg’s. The syndicated show’s first and last air dates are disputed but generally accepted as September 19, 1952 and April 28, 1958.[1] The show’s first two seasons (episodes 1–52, 26 titles per season) were filmed in black-and-white; seasons three through six (episodes 53–104, 13 titles per season) were filmed in color but originally telecast monochromatically in first-run syndication. Television viewers did not see Superman in color until the series was syndicated to local stations in 1965.[2][3]

George Reeves played Clark Kent/Superman, with Jack Larson as Jimmy Olsen, John Hamilton as Perry White, and Robert Shayne as Inspector Henderson. Phyllis Coates played Lois Lane in the first season, with Noel Neill stepping into the role in the second season (1953). Superman battles crooks, gangsters, and other villains in the fictional city of Metropolis while masquerading “off-duty” as Daily Planet reporter Clark Kent. Lois Lane and Jimmy Olsen, Clark’s colleagues at the office, often find themselves in dangerous situations which can only be resolved with Superman’s timely intervention.

Its opening theme is known as The

Superman

March. In 1987, selected episodes of the show were released to video. In 2006, the series became available in its entirety on DVD. Hollywoodland was released in 2006, a film dramatizing the show’s production and the death of its star George Reeves.

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The Love of Life (1955)

The Love of Life (1955)

​Roy Winsor

Starring Audrey Peters

Ron Tomme

Country of origin United States

Original language(s) English

No. of seasons 29

No. of episodes 7,316

Production

Running time 15 minutes (1951–1958)

30 minutes (1958–1962, 1969–1973, 1979–1980)

25 minutes (1962–1969, 1973–1979)

Release

Original network CBS

Picture format Black-and-white

(1951–1967)

Color

(1967–1980)

Audio format Monaural


Original release September 24, 1951 – February 1, 1980

Love of Life is an American soap opera which aired on CBS from September 24, 1951, to February 1, 1980. It was created by Roy Winsor, whose previous creation Search for Tomorrow had premiered three weeks before Love of Life, and who would go on to create The Secret Storm two and a half years later.

Production 

Love of Life originally came from Liederkranz Hall on East 58th Street in Manhattan. Mike and Buff (Mike Wallace), Ernie Kovacs, and Douglas Edwards and the News, as well as Search for Tomorrow and The Guiding Light also came from that location. The program originated at other studios in Manhattan, but primarily at the CBS Broadcast Center on West 57th Street and CBS’ Studio 52 behind the Ed Sullivan Theater. In 1975, the series moved to make way for a nightclub that became known as Studio 54. Until its final episode in 1980, Love of Life was taped in Studio 44 at the CBS Broadcast Center.

Format 

Unlike most other soap operas, Love of Life was originally not split up into segments dictated by commercial breaks. Because the show was owned by packaged-goods giant American Home Products and merely licensed to CBS, all commercials were for AHP brands, and occurred before or after the show. In the 1960s, one commercial break was allotted around the middle of the program, but this was mostly to allow affiliates to reconnect with the feed after airing local commercials. Love of Life adopted the “five segments per half-hour” standard in the 1970s.

On April 23, 1979, CBS moved Love of Life to the 4:00/3:00 pm slot that had opened when Match Game was canceled. For this slot, episodes again had a full 30-minute duration, accommodating the whole slot. However, ratings plummeted upon relocating; an increasing number of CBS affiliates pre-empted the serial to show more profitable syndicated programming. Beginning in September 1979, in some markets, this included a new daily syndicated version of the Match Game, which went up against (and, in some cases, was shown in place of) Love of Life.

Despite CBS moving the show to the 4:00/3:00 timeslot, some affiliates chose to air it at earlier timeslots in pattern with the other soaps. For example, in Indianapolis, then-CBS affiliate WISH-TV aired Love of Life at 3:30 (Eastern) while airing One Day at a Time reruns at 4:00. Many West Coast stations, such as KNXT (now KCBS-TV) in Los Angeles, did this, as well, keeping Love of Life in tandem with the other soaps by airing it at 2:30 Pacific time, after Guiding Light. Other stations, such as then-O&O KMOX-TV (now KMOV) in St. Louis, kept the show in late morning at 11:00 (Central). Additionally, WUSA (then WDVM) in Washington, DC, chose to keep Love of Life at 11:30 while pre-empting The Price is Right. In the soap’s home market of New York City, WCBS-TV aired it at noon.

Within 10 months, CBS realized that the 4:00 slot would not work for Love of Life in light of affiliate tape-delays and pre-emptions, and subsequently cancelled the show. Its final episode aired on February 1, 1980. The following Monday, The Young and the Restless expanded to an hour, with One Day at a Time moving into the 4:00/3:00 timeslot. According to rumors, once CBS cancelled Love of Life, they intended to use the show’s New York studio space for the 1980 Winter Olympics, which took place later that month in Lake Placid, New York.

Director Larry Auerbach said that he lamented the network’s 4:00/3:00 slot choice on the CBS Evening News the day Love of Life finished airing, feeling that the slot was better suited to airing shows that appealed to kids after school.



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Posted by on June 12, 2017 in classic television

 

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“Mr. Blue ( Bobby Vinton Lyrics)”

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Stanley Robert “Bobby” Vinton, Jr. (born April 16, 1935) is an American pop music singer of Polish and Lithuanian ethnic background. In pop music circles, he became known as “The Polish Prince of Poch”, as his music pays tribute to his Polish heritage. Known for his angelic vocals in love songs, his most popular song, “Blue Velvet” (a cover of Tony Bennett’s 1951 song), peaked at No. 1 on the now renamed Billboard Pop Singles Chart. It also served as inspiration for the film of the same name.

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Blue on Blue is Bobby Vinton’s sixth studio album, released in 1963. Cover versions include the jazz songs “St. Louis Blues” and “Blueberry Hill”, “Am I Blue”, “Blue, Blue Day”, the Fleetwoods’ hit “Mr. Blue“, “My Blue Heaven”, three show tunes (“Blue Skies”, “Blue Hawaii” and “Blue Moon”), and The Clovers Rhythm and blues hit, “Blue Velvet”.

The song “Blue on Blue” was mentioned in Kim Mitchell’s hit song “Patio Lanterns”.

Composition and Background

Completely devoted to songs that refer to the color blue, this album contained two singles: “Blue on Blue”, which reached #3 on the U.S. Pop charts and “Blue Velvet”, which went on to #1 for three weeks on the same chart.[1] Both songs served as title tracks during their popularity.[1] The album was released after the success of the song “Blue on Blue”, but when “Blue Velvet” became a hit, the album’s title was changed with it being the title track.[1] It was only after the title change that the album managed to enter the Billboard 200 list of popular albums; it reached #10.[1]

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THE FABULOUS 52 

Film students and movie buffs everywhere are searching for the lost music and history compositions of The Fabulous 52.  

The Fabulous 52 aired each Saturday night (11:30) on KNXT’s Channel 2 ( late 1950s/Los Angeles)  showing its big, bold  title superimposed upon the well-lit, KNXT/CBS studio.   Who can forget the spot-aerial lights that stretched out  into the starry night skies?

A beautiful orchestra flaired  an unknown but unforgettable, classical, opening theme.  Both the music and studio imagery gave prominence to many of Hollywood’s greatest  performances.  The Fabulous 52  is remembered as a most impressive television,  feature film presentation of the late 1950s.   

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Referencing  “Broadcasting Telecasting (Jan-Mar 1959), ” Tv Movie Missionary • Starlet, Sandy Warner holds up some of the Paramount footage KNXT (TV) Los Angeles charged her with promoting for a movie splash starting this week. 

To herald 12 major motion pictures premiering on KNXT, “Miss Paramount Week” has been calling on  the press, riding in holiday parades, appearing at public functions and posing for lots of pictures. 

Backing up its front woman, KNXT sent up a plane over the New Year’s Day Rose Bowl parade with an exclusive sky-writing franchise to reach an expected 1.5 million parade watchers. Also in the Paramount Week promotion kit:  $50,000 worth of air promotion time, 18,000 lines in local newspapers, four pages in Tv Guide, giant bus posters, market cards, direct mail, bottle labels, billboards and a full- scale publicity campaign in newspapers and magazines. 

The 12 Paramount Week features are being shown on the weeknight Early Show and Big Hit Movies, Saturday’s Fabulous 52 show and a Sunday film program. 

Paramount Week movies star: Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Fredric March, Herbert Marshall, Barbara Stanwyck, Jack Benny, Fred MacMurray, Claudette Colbert, Marlene Dietrich and others. Each and every feature film in this distinguished group offers a sales and rating dream and top-flight stars of first-rate pictures: 

  • CALL NORTHSIDE 777 

Richard  Conte 

  • MOTHER WORE TIGHTS 

Betty Grable, Dan Dailey 

  • THE RAINS CAME 

Tyrone Power, Myrna Loy 

  • HEAVEN CAN WAIT 

Gene Tierney, Don Ameche 

  • CALL OF THE WILD 

Clark Gable, Loretta Young 

  • ROAD TO GLORY 

Fredric March, Lionel Barrymore, James Stewart, Lee J. Cobb


For the full story,
get in touch today with . . .
MTA NATIONAL TELEFILM

HI H ASSOCIATES, INC., 10 Columbus Circle. New York 19 

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 “The Untouchables – 1959 – TV Series – ABC” 

Genre Crime drama

Starring Robert Stack

Abel Fernandez

Nicholas Georgiade

Paul Picerni

Steve London

Bruce Gordon

Neville Brand

Narrated by Walter Winchell

Theme music composer Nelson Riddle

Composer(s) Bill Loose

Jack Cookerly

Nelson Riddle

Country of origin United States

Original language(s) English

No. of seasons 4

No. of episodes 118 & two-part pilot (list of episodes)

Production

Executive producer(s) Alan A. Armer

Desi Arnaz

Leonard Freeman

Quinn Martin

Jerry Thorpe

Producer(s) Alan A. Armer

Alvin Cooperman

Walter Grauman

Bert Granet

Paul Harrison

Herman Hoffman

Sidney Marshall

Vincent McEveety

Del Reisman

Norman Retchin

Lloyd Richards

Stuart Rosenberg

Charles Russell

Josef Shaftel

Cinematography Robert B. Hauser

Glen MacWilliams

Charles Straumer

Camera setup Single-camera

Running time 50 minutes

Production company(s) Desilu Productions

Langford Productions

Distributor Desilu Sales (until 1967)

Paramount Domestic Television (1967–2006)

CBS Paramount Domestic Television (2006–2007)

CBS Television Distribution (2007– )

Release

Original network ABC

Picture format Black-and-white

Audio format Monaural

Original release October 15, 1959 – May 21, 1963


The Untouchables is an American crime drama that ran from 1959 to 1963 on the ABC Television Network, produced by Desilu Productions. Based on the memoir of the same name by Eliot Ness and Oscar Fraley, it fictionalized Ness’ experiences as a Prohibition agent, fighting crime in Chicago in the 1930s with the help of a special team of agents handpicked for their courage, moral character, and incorruptibility, nicknamed the Untouchables. The book was later made into a film in 1987 (also called The Untouchables) by Brian De Palma, with a script by David Mamet, and a second, less-successful TV series in 1993.

A powerful, dynamic, hard-hitting action drama, and a landmark crime series,[1] The Untouchables won series star Robert Stack an Emmy Award for Best Actor in a Dramatic Series in 1960.[2]
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 “People Are Funny: The Unlikely Job || a classic TV encore with Art Linkletter” 

​People Are Funny is an American radio and television game show, created by John Guedel that ran from 1942 to 1960 in which contestants were asked to carry out stunts.


Radio 
The series began in 1938 when Guedel made an audition recording, and the following year, his concept of a comedy stunt show aired in Los Angeles as Pull Over, Neighbor, later reworked into All Aboard. Watching a bored, unreceptive audience listening to an after-dinner speaker, Guedel scribbled, “People are funny, aren’t they?” on a napkin, and he had his title.

In 1942, learning of a show that was canceled, he pitched People Are Funny to NBC, and it went on the air April 10, 1942 with Art Baker as host. In a popular first-season stunt, a man was assigned to register a trained seal at the Knickerbocker Hotel while explaining that the seal was his girlfriend.[1]


On October 1, 1943, Baker was replaced by Art Linkletter, who continued for the rest of the series. For a memorable stunt of 1945, Linkletter announced that $1,000 would go to the first person to find one of 12 plastic balls floating off California. Two years later, an Ennylageban Island[2] native claimed the prize.[1][3]

As the popularity of the program escalated, a movie musical titled People Are Funny was released in 1946, offering a fictional version of the show’s origin in a tale of rival radio producers. Phillip Reed appeared as Guedel, with Linkletter and Frances Langford portraying themselves. Also in the cast were Jack Haley, Helen Walker, Ozzie Nelson and Rudy Vallée. One outstanding moment in the film is a Spanish dance number performed by Lupe Mayorga (aka Lillian Molieri) to the song “I Love My Marimba.” The radio series moved to CBS from 1951 to 1954, returning to NBC from 1954 to 1960.[1]

Television 

Linkletter continued as host of the show during its run on television from September 19, 1954 to April 1, 1960. In one stunt, a contestant would win a prize if he could sustain a phone conversation with a puzzled stranger (picked at random from the phone directory) for several minutes without the other party hanging up. The series received Emmy nominations in 1955 and 1956. It finished #27 in the Nielsen ratings for the 1955-1956 season, then finished #21 for 1956-1957 and #29 for 1957-1958.[4]
Although the series ended on April 1, 1960, the network aired encores until April 13, 1961, making People Are Funny the first game show to air repeats. On March 24, 1984, a “reconstituted” version of People Are Funny with Flip Wilson as host returned to NBC where it was telecast until July 21.

 

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