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“ROBERT & JOHNNY – WE BELONG TOGETHER”

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We Belong Together” was a 1958 American rhythm and blues hit written and recorded by Robert & Johnny, with a co-writing credit to Hy Weiss. It reached #12 on the R&B charts and #32 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

Cover versions

The song was later recorded by several others. The Fleetwoods released a version on their 1959 album, Mr. Blue.

A rendition by Ritchie Valens was released in 1959 on the Del-Fi record label and can be found on several of his albums. It’s also featured in a scene from the 1987 hit film about Valens, La Bamba in which the song was sung by Los Lobos.

The Belmonts released a remake on the Laurie label, Laurie 3080, in 1961, after they had split with Dion. It was not a hit, but was later reissued on a collector’s label because of its musical value.

In 1961, Jimmy Mullins, known as Jimmy Velvit,[1] recorded it in the Dallas, Texas area. It was issued in January, 1962 on M-G-M’s Cub Records label (K9105). It attracted a lot of attention and air-play and became the #1 song on the Dallas radio station, KLIF, for a period of six weeks.

A different singer, Jimmy Tennant, using the name Jimmy Velvet, had a #75 hit with the song on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1964.[2] Tennant had initially recorded and released the song on his own Velvet label (co-owned with Ray Curran) in April, 1963 (Velvet 201-63), using the same name Mullins was using, Jimmy Velvit. That same issue was briefly re-issued in August, 1963 on the Cortland label’s Witch Records subsidiary (#115) in an effort to take the Velvet Records release to a national level. Tennant used another song from the session, “I’m Gonna Try” as the flip side of both releases, the same song the earlier Jimmy Velvit (Jimmy Mullins) had used on his 1962 Cub version. That song had been written by Mullins. The hit release (as by Jimmy Velvet) on ABC-Paramount 10488 used “History Of Love” (recorded at the same April session) as the flip side, which was first issued by November, 1963.[3]

Peaches & Herb included the song on their album, Let’s Fall In Love.

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 “People Are Funny: The Unlikely Job || a classic TV encore with Art Linkletter” 

​People Are Funny is an American radio and television game show, created by John Guedel that ran from 1942 to 1960 in which contestants were asked to carry out stunts.


Radio
The series began in 1938 when Guedel made an audition recording, and the following year, his concept of a comedy stunt show aired in Los Angeles as Pull Over, Neighbor, later reworked into All Aboard. Watching a bored, unreceptive audience listening to an after-dinner speaker, Guedel scribbled, “People are funny, aren’t they?” on a napkin, and he had his title.

In 1942, learning of a show that was canceled, he pitched People Are Funny to NBC, and it went on the air April 10, 1942 with Art Baker as host. In a popular first-season stunt, a man was assigned to register a trained seal at the Knickerbocker Hotel while explaining that the seal was his girlfriend.[1]


On October 1, 1943, Baker was replaced by Art Linkletter, who continued for the rest of the series. For a memorable stunt of 1945, Linkletter announced that $1,000 would go to the first person to find one of 12 plastic balls floating off California. Two years later, an Ennylageban Island[2] native claimed the prize.[1][3]

As the popularity of the program escalated, a movie musical titled People Are Funny was released in 1946, offering a fictional version of the show’s origin in a tale of rival radio producers. Phillip Reed appeared as Guedel, with Linkletter and Frances Langford portraying themselves. Also in the cast were Jack Haley, Helen Walker, Ozzie Nelson and Rudy Vallée. One outstanding moment in the film is a Spanish dance number performed by Lupe Mayorga (aka Lillian Molieri) to the song “I Love My Marimba.” The radio series moved to CBS from 1951 to 1954, returning to NBC from 1954 to 1960.[1]

Television 

Linkletter continued as host of the show during its run on television from September 19, 1954 to April 1, 1960. In one stunt, a contestant would win a prize if he could sustain a phone conversation with a puzzled stranger (picked at random from the phone directory) for several minutes without the other party hanging up. The series received Emmy nominations in 1955 and 1956. It finished #27 in the Nielsen ratings for the 1955-1956 season, then finished #21 for 1956-1957 and #29 for 1957-1958.[4]
Although the series ended on April 1, 1960, the network aired encores until April 13, 1961, making People Are Funny the first game show to air repeats. On March 24, 1984, a “reconstituted” version of People Are Funny with Flip Wilson as host returned to NBC where it was telecast until July 21.

 

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“Sam Riddle – Hollywood A Go Go – Gazzarri Dancers”

“Sam Riddle – Hollywood A Go Go – Gazzarri Dancers”


Hollywood A Go-Go was a Los Angeles-based music variety show that ran in syndication in the mid-1960s. It was hosted by Sam Riddle, with music by The Sinners and dancing by The Gazzarri Dancers.

The program originated as a local series, Ninth Street West, on KHJ-TV (Channel 9) in 1964. As Hollywood A Go-Go, it was syndicated in early 1965 and ceased production in 1966, with some television stations airing the show as late as the summer of 1966. In its brief run (52 episodes), the show featured well-known acts like Tina Turner, Frankie Lymon, Smokey Robinson & the Miracles, The Challengers, James Brown, Lesley Gore, Fontella Bass, Wilson Pickett, Booker T & The MGs, Bo Diddley, Freddy Cannon, Sonny & Cher, The Bobby Fuller Four, The Fugitives, and Aretha Franklin.

Hollywood A Go-Go was produced at the KHJ-TV studios. Its original syndicator was Four Star Television. Rights to surviving footage of the show (preserved on kinescope film) are now represented by Research Video. The Sinners were the house band featuring Eddie Kaplan on lead guitar.

Wikipefia.org

Beloved 60s Go-Go Dancer Who Bounced Back After Living On Skid Row Dies

BY JULIET BENNETT RYLAH IN NEWS

June Fairchild (Screenshot from ‘Thunderbolt and Light Foot’)

June Fairchild—an actress, dancer and former Skid Row tenant—has died at 68 of liver cancer. Her life story reveals an interesting slice of Hollywood life in the ’60s, as well as a touching tale of recovery.

Fairchild (real name June Wilson) had an interesting life with the sort of highs and lows you often only see in films. She went to school in Redondo Beach and was the Prom Queen at her high school. She began her career as a dancer, later appeared in several films, fell on rough times and bounced back. She spent her final years living in downtown Los Angeles. She died on Tuesday after a battle with liver cancer, the L.A. Times reports.

Back in the ’60s, there was a show called Hollywood A Go-Go. Though nationally syndicated, the show was hosted by L.A. DJ Sam Riddle and filmed live in Hollywood at the KHJ studios. The show aired on Saturday nights and featured various musical guests. And behind every musical guest was a team of dancers known as The Gazzarri Dancers (notably, they had no connection to the Sunset Strip bar Gazzarri’s). Fairchild was one such dancer and a fan favorite.

Fairchild’s dance career began one night at the bar Gazzarri’s, oddly enough. Producer Al Burton spotted her dancing and offered her a role on Hollywood A Go-Go. At the time, she was dating Three Dog Night’s Danny Hutton. She actually came up with the band’s name after reading about Aborigines who cuddled with their dogs at night for warmth.

Hollywood A Go-Go only aired for two years, but several clips have been archived and posted on YouTube, L.A. Observed notes.

Here’s her dancing with Bob Lind. She’s the girl with the bangs.

Here she is snubbing Lou Rawls.

After the show, Fairchild landed roles in TV and film, including Cheech & Chong’s Up in SmokeThunderbolt and Lightning Footwith Clint Eastwood and Drive, He Said. Here’s her playing a woman who mistakes Ajax for cocaine in Up in Smoke.

However, by 2001, she was homeless on Skid Row. She later spoke on Good Morning America about how she got into drugs, got trapped in two abusive relationships after Hutton and fell into a downward spiral that led to her living in a cardboard box on the streets with an alley cat as her only friend.

Eventually, two friends of Fairchild’s from high school found her while trying to invite her to a class reunion. They helped Fairchild pull out of her dire situation. She continued to live in downtown Los Angeles, and briefly appears in a KCET video about King Eddy. (It’s worth a watch just to reminisce and listen to Ron Swanson-esque then-manger Bill Roller extoll the virtues of microwave food.)

On a website dedicated to the Gazzarri Dancers, Fairchild is memorialized as being “an eternal optimist with a positive spin on whatever life threw her way.” There is a GoFundMe for Fairchild’s memorial here.

Hollywood a Go Go complete show open and close”


Source: http://amp.laist.com/amp/articles/create?article_id=587bbf22dce0cb000158c910

 
 

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The Original Stroll – February 1958

The Original Stroll – February 1958

featured image: http://www.purpleclover.com/

The Stroll was both a slow rock ‘n’ roll dance[1] and a song that was popular in the late 1950s.[2] Billboard first reported that “The Stroll” might herald a new dance craze similar to the “Big Apple” in December 1957.[3][4] “The Stroll” was written by Clyde Otis and Nancy Lee and was recorded by the Canadian group the Diamonds (Mercury 71242).[5][6] The Diamonds versions also featured a saxophone soloist. The original version of the song reached number four on the Billboard pop charts, number five on the R&B charts,[7] and number one on the Cashbox charts.[8] In the dance, two lines of dancers, men on one side and women on the other, face each other, moving in place to the music. Each paired couple then steps out and does a more elaborate dance up and down between the rows of dancers.[9] Dick Clark noted the similarity of the dance to the Virginia reel.[10] It was first performed to “C. C. Rider” by Chuck Willis on American Bandstand. Link Wray’s “Rumble” was also a popular tune for doing the stroll. When 1950s nostalgia came to the forefront in the 1970s, the Stroll saw renewed public awareness. It was used in the film American Graffiti (1973) during the scene at the High School Dance and is mentioned in some of the lyrics in the musical Grease. Led Zeppelin’s 1950s rock homage “Rock and Roll” mentions the Stroll. The stroll was an integral part of most episodes of the dance TV series Soul Train, where host and creator Don Cornelius dubbed it the “Soul Train Line.”

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LITTLE STEVIE WONDER “CONTRACT OF LOVE”

LITTLE STEVIE WONDER “CONTRACT OF LOVE”

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Looking Back, also known as Anthology, is a triple LP anthology by American soul musician Stevie Wonder, released in 1977 on Motown Records.[3] Since its release in 12-inch triple LP format, it has not been reissued and is considered a limited edition.[4] The album chronicles 40 songs from Wonder’s first Motown period, which precedes the classic period of his critically acclaimed albums.

Overview

Between 1963 and the end of 1971, Wonder placed over 25 songs on Billboard Hot 100.[5] Twenty-four of those — including such radio staples as “Fingertips, Pt. 2”, “Uptight (Everything’s Alright)”, “I Was Made to Love Her”, “For Once in My Life”, “My Cherie Amour”, and “Signed, Sealed, Delivered I’m Yours” — appear on Looking Back. Wonder’s recordings in the ’60s stand apart from most Motown acts partially because he was paired with producers and writers who very rarely worked with the Temptations, Supremes, etc. In his early years, Wonder was often produced by Clarence Paul and/or William Stevenson and, during the golden years, by Henry Cosby. Then in 1970, Wonder started producing himself, beginning with Signed, Sealed & Delivered. Most of his singles were written by Wonder himself in tandem with a variety of others, or by Ron Miller. The hits alternated between stomping barn-burners and mid-tempo, understated ballads.

Before the long-awaited Wonder box set, At the Close of a Century, was issued, this triple-album set was the ultimate early Wonder collection. It contains every major hit and many other vital singles from 1962–1971, showing his evolution from Ray Charles’ disciple to assembly-line hitmaker to individualistic artist. Unlike its other anthologies, which have been carved down from three-volume vinyl LPs to double-disc sets, Motown simply deleted this one altogether, although vigilant collectors may be able to obtain it through used record stores. It wouldn’t be until 1999’s At the Close of a Century that another Stevie Wonder anthology which included material from this period would be released.

This compilation marks the first release of Stevie Wonder’s 1967 original recording of “Until You Come Back To Me (That’s What I’m Gonna Do),” which was a 1973 hit for Aretha Franklin. It’s also the only collection of his to feature material from his instrumental album Eivets Rednow.

 

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I MARRIED JOAN starring Joan Davis with Jim Backus

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I Married Joan is an American sitcom that aired on NBC from 1952 to 1955. It starred veteran vaudeville, film, and radio comedian-comedy actress Joan Davis as the manic, scatterbrained wife of a mild-mannered community judge, the Honorable Bradley Stevens (Jim Backus).

Synopsis

Davis as Joan Stevens
The show, whose syndicated opening makes the claim “America’s favorite comedy show, starring America’s queen of comedy, Joan Davis, as Mrs. Joan Stevens.” focused on a married couple, Joan and Bradley Stevens. I Married Joan’s trademark was broad physical slapstick, with Joan Stevens portrayed as bright but somewhat childlike and given to misunderstanding.  Virtually every episode had a plot which provided star Davis with a setup for at least one scene of over-the-top physical comedy.  Davis’s real-life daughter, Beverly Wills, was a regular cast member for several months of the show’s second season, portraying Joan’s sister, Beverly Grossman. Early installments began with Backus, as Judge Stevens in chambers, recalling how one of his wife’s madcap mishaps paralleled the problems of a couple seeking a divorce; this was followed by the unfolding of the episode, which ended back in chambers with Judge Stevens summing up his tale for the now-reconciled couple.  This wraparound scenario was abandoned after a handful of episodes

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Sponsored by General Electric (original network openings extolled the virtues of the sponsor’s products rather than those of its star), I Married Joan was aimed at the viewers who watched I Love Lucy, which had debuted the previous year and was already television’s top-rated situation comedy.  I Love Lucy and I Married Joan even employed the same director in each show’s first season, namely Marc Daniels.  

NBC scheduled I Married Joan Wednesdays at 8:00 ET against the first half of Arthur Godfrey and his Friends on CBS for the entirety of its three-season run.  The show performed marginally during its first year, but enjoyed a surge in the Nielsen ratings during its second season in the wake of Godfrey’s firing of Julius LaRosa and the resultant negative publicity.  In its third year, I Married Joan withered against the additional competition of ABC’s new top-rated hit Disneyland and was canceled, airing its last first-run episode on March 23, 1955.[1] Although Davis’ personal health problems have also been cited as a reason for the show’s cancellation, she was seen performing robust physical comedy as a guest star on variety series years after her own show ended.

Though I Married Joan was an NBC television series, CBS Paramount Television subsequently became the primary owners of the program’s copyright. The copyrights on some of the episodes eventually lapsed without being renewed; as a result, I Married Joan has several episodes in the public domain.

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“Mutiny on the Bounty  Movie Clip Half Rations” 

Mutiny on the Bounty is a 1962 American Technicolor epic historical drama film starring Marlon Brando, Trevor Howard and Richard Harris, based on the novel Mutiny on the Bountyby Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall.

The film retells the 1789 real-life mutinyaboard HMAV Bounty led by Fletcher Christian against the ship’s captain, William Bligh. It is the second American film to be made from the novel, the first being Mutiny on the Bounty (1935). It was directed by Lewis Milestone, who replaced Carol Reed early in the production schedule, and it turned out to be Milestone’s final film.

The screenplay was written by Charles Lederer (with uncredited input from Eric Ambler, William L. Driscoll, Borden Chase, John Gay and Ben Hecht).[2] The score was composed by Bronisław Kaper.

Mutiny on the Bounty was filmed in the Ultra Panavision 70 widescreen process, the first motion picture so credited. It was partly shot on location in the South Pacific. Behind the scenes, Marlon Brando effectively took over directing duties himself and caused it to become far behind schedule and over budget — resulting in director Carol Reed pulling out of the project and being replaced by Lewis Milestone who is credited as director of the picture. The film was heavily panned, and was considered a box office bomb, having lost over $6 million.

A replica of the Bounty was constructed for the film. Fifty years after the release of the film, the vessel sank in Hurricane Sandy with loss of life.

Plot

In the year 1787, the Bounty sets sail from Britain for Tahiti under the command of captain William Bligh (Trevor Howard). Her mission is to transport breadfruit to Jamaica, where hopefully it will thrive and provide a cheap source of food for the slaves.

The voyage gets off to a difficult start with the discovery that some cheese is missing. Bligh, the true pilferer, is accused of the theft by seaman John Mills (Richard Harris), and Bligh has Mills brutally flogged for showing contempt to his superior officer, to the disgust of his patrician second-in-command, 1st Lieutenant Fletcher Christian (Marlon Brando). The tone for the months to come is summarized by Bligh’s ominous pronouncement that “cruelty with a purpose is not cruelty, it is efficiency.” Aristocrat Christian is deeply offended by his ambitious captain.

Bligh attempts to reach Tahiti sooner by attempting the shorter westbound route around Cape Horn, a navigational nightmare. The strategy fails and the Bounty backtracks east, costing the mission much time. Singleminded Bligh attempts to make up the lost time by pushing the crew harder and cutting their rations.

When the Bounty reaches her destination, the crew revels in the easygoing life of the tropical paradise — and in the free-love philosophies of the Tahitian women. Christian himself is smitten with Maimiti (Tarita Teriipaia), daughter of the Tahitian king. Bligh’s agitation is further fueled by a dormancy period of the breadfruit: more months of delay until the plants can be transplanted. As departure day nears, three men, including seaman Mills, attempt to desert but are caught by Christian and clapped in irons by Bligh.

On the return voyage, Bligh attempts to bring back twice the number of breadfruit plants to atone for his tardiness, and must reduce the water rations of the crew to water the extra plants. One member of the crew falls from the rigging to his death while attempting to retrieve the drinking ladle. Another assaults Bligh over conditions on the ship and is fatally keelhauled. Mills taunts Christian after each death, trying to egg him on to challenge Bligh. When a crewman becomes gravely ill from drinking seawater, Christian attempts to give him fresh water in violation of the Captain’s orders. Bligh strikes Christian when he ignores his second order to stop. In response, Christian strikes Bligh. Bligh informs Christian that he will hang for his action when they reach port. With nothing left to lose, Christian takes command of the ship and sets Bligh and the loyalist members of the crew adrift in the longboat with navigational equipment, telling them to make for a local island. Bligh decides instead to cross much of the Pacific in order to reach British authorities sooner and arrives back in Britain with remarkable speed.

The military court exonerates Bligh of misdeed and recommends an expedition to arrest the mutineers and put them on trial, but also comes to the conclusion that the appointment of Bligh as captain of The Bounty was wrong. In the meantime, Christian sails back to Tahiti to pick up supplies and the girlfriends of the crew, then on to remote and wrongly charted Pitcairn Island to hide from the wrath of the Royal Navy. Once on Pitcairn, Christian decides that it is their duty to return to Britain and testify to Bligh’s wrongdoing and asks his men to sail with him. To prevent this possibility the men set the ship on fire and Christian is fatally burned while trying to save it. (In real life, Christian made the decision to set the ship on fire and died years later of another cause).


 

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