RSS

Category Archives: classic television

Dr. Kildare T.V. Series (1961-1966)

Dr. Kildare T.V. Series (1961-1966)

Dr. James Kildare is a fictional American medical doctor character, originally created in the 1930s by the author Frederick Schiller Faust under the pen name Max Brand. Shortly after the character’s first appearance in a magazine story, Paramount Picturesused the story and character as the basis for the 1937 film Internes Can’t Take MoneyMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) subsequently acquired the rights and featured Kildare as the primary character in a series of Americantheatrical films in the late 1930s and early 1940s, several of which were co-written by Faust (as Max Brand), who also continued to write magazine stories and novels about the character until the early 1940s.[1][2] The Kildare character was later featured in an early 1950s radio series,[3] a 1960s television series,[4] a comic book[5] and comic strip[6] based on the 1960s TV show, and a short-lived second 1970s television series.


Television

In 1953, Lew Ayres was approached to play “Dr. Kildare” in a television series, which would feature Dr. Kildare having finally taken over the practice of a retired Dr. Gillespie. After two pilots were filmed, Ayres refused to work further on the project unless the television studio refused to allow cigarette companies to sponsor the program. Ayres later explained, “My feeling was that a medical show, particularly one that might appeal to children, should not be used to sell cigarettes.” The studio would not agree to reject lucrative advertising, so the project was abandoned.[49]

Raymond Massey as “Dr. Gillespie” and Richard Chamberlain as “Dr. Kildare”, in the 1961 Dr. Kildare television series.

A second attempt at a television series was made in the early 1960s with Dr. Kildare, a NBC medical drama television series starring Richard Chamberlain in the title role, produced by MGM Television and inspired by the original Dr. Kildare stories and films. Lew Ayres appeared as “Dr. Gillespie” in a 1960 unsold and unaired pilot (with Joseph Cronin as Kildare), but Raymond Masseywas cast as Gillespie in the version that finally went to air.[50][51] Premiering on September 28, 1961, the series was a top-10 hit with audiences and ran until April 5, 1966, for a total of 191 episodes in five seasons.[52][53] The first two seasons told the story of Dr. James Kildare (Chamberlain), working in a fictional large metropolitan hospital while trying to learn his profession, deal with his patients’ problems and earn the respect of the senior Dr. Leonard Gillespie (Massey). In the third season, Dr. Kildare was promoted to resident and the series began to focus more on the stories of the patients and their families.[54] The success of the show (along with ABC’s contemporaneous medical drama Ben Casey) inspired the launch of numerous other television medical dramas in the ensuing years.

In 1972 MGM Television created a short-lived syndicated drama series called Young Dr. Kildare, starring Mark Jenkinsas Dr. James Kildare and Gary Merrill as Dr. Leonard Gillespie. The series was not a success, and only 24 episodes were produced.

Wikipedia.org


https://youtu.be/RpS-5821I0I

 
 

Tags:

Fury (1955-1960) tv series clip

Fury (1955-1960) tv series clip

Fury (retitled Brave Stallion in syndicated reruns) is an American western television series that aired on NBC from 1955 to 1960. It stars Peter Graves as Jim Newton, who operates the Broken Wheel Ranch in CaliforniaBobby Diamond as Jim’s adopted son, Joey Clark Newton, and William Fawcettas ranch hand Pete Wilkey. Roger Mobley co-starred in the two final seasons as Homer “Packy” Lambert, a friend of Joey’s.[1]

  The frequent introduction to the show depicts the beloved stallion running inside the corral and approaching the camera as the announcer reads: “FURY!..The story of a horse..and a boy who loves him.” Fury is the first American series produced originally by Television Programs of America and later by the British-based company ITC Entertainment.

Synopsis

The story begins with two young boys fighting on the street. As the winner of the exchange, Joey Clark, walks away, the loser attempts to throw something at him, but the object goes through a nearby window. The store owner quickly pins the blame on Joey, who has been labeled a troublemaker from past incidents. Rancher Jim Newton witnesses the incident and follows along as Joey is taken before the judge to clear the boy’s name. After learning that Joey is an orphan, Newton takes him home to his Broken Wheel Ranch and begins adoption procedures.

A typical plot involved a guest star who falls into mischief, was rebellious or disorderly, and got into trouble but is subsequently rescued by Fury. In most episodes, Fury allowed only Joey to ride him, but occasionally others were allowed the honor of mounting Fury if they had done a good deed for the horse. One of the original conceits of the show was that Fury remained a ‘wild’ (untamed) horse, who wouldn’t allow anyone but Joey to ride him or even come near him. In several episodes people would see the calm interaction between the horse “and the boy who loved him,” and assume that the horse must be broken — but when they tried to put a saddle on him, Fury would rear up and attack them!

Numerous episodes focus on youth organizations, including the Boy ScoutsBig BrothersJunior Achievement4-H ClubLittle League, and even the Girl Scouts. A 1957 episode is dedicated to Fire Prevention Week.[2]

Ann Robinson played Joey Newton’s dedicated teacher, Helen Watkins, in nine episodes of the first season.[3] In addition to Roger Mobley as Packy Lambert, another friend of Joey’s is portrayed in the series by child actor Jimmy Baird (born 1945), who was cast as Rodney “Pee Wee” Jenkins.[4]James Seay portrayed a sheriff in six episodes. Maudie Prickett was cast twice, once in the title role of “Aunt Harriet” (1958).

Among the other guest stars were Shelley Fabares as Midge Mallon in “The Tomboy” (1957), Tony Young in “Timber Walker” (1959), Lee Van Cleef as Race Collins in “House Guests” (1959), and Walter Maslow in “The Relay Station” (1959).

Jim Bannon appeared twice on Fury, once as a prison warden in the episode “Fish Story” (1958). Andy Clyde was cast in “Fury Runs to Win” (1956) and “Black Gold” (1959). Russ Conway was cast in “Joey Goes Hunting” (1955) and “A Present for Packy” (1960). Nan Lesliewas cast twice on Fury, as Stella Lambert in “The Model Plane” (1958) and as Packy’s mother in “The Pulling Contest” (1959). Paul Picerni of Untouchables fame,portrayed Tupelo in “Packy, the Lion Tamer” (1960). He also appeared in “An Old Indian Trick” (1959). John M. Pickard, star of the syndicated Boots and Saddles western series, appeared in the episodes “Timber” (1956) and “Trail Drive” (1959). Will Wright, known for his curmudgeonly roles, was cast in “Ghost Town” (1955) and “The Meanest Man” (1958).

Much of the outdoor footage was shot at the Iverson Movie Ranch in ChatsworthCalifornia, where the “Fury Set” was built specifically for the series. This set included a small house, a shed, corrals, and other features, but it was dominated by a large barn. The Fury Set was used in the films Fury at Showdown(1957) and The 30 Foot Bride of Candy Rock (1959) and the television series, Bonanza and Cimarron Strip, before it burned to the ground in the massive Newhall/Malibu fire of 1970.

Wikipedia.org

 
 

Tags: ,

“Hamm’s Beer 1950’s TV commercial snippet”

“Hamm’s Beer 1950’s TV commercial snippet”

During Prohibition, the company survived by producing soft drinks and other food products, enabling it to expand rapidly through acquisitions after the repeal of Prohibition in 1933. From 1933 until 1965 Hamm’s saw much success; much of this can attributed to William C. Figge Jr. taking over as President in 1951. Figge expanded the Hamm’s brand into a national entity with breweries in St. Paul, Minnesota; Los Angeles, California; San Francisco, California; Baltimore, Maryland; and Houston, Texas. The latter two were short-lived and closed soon after they opened. As the company celebrated its 100th anniversary, the family decided to sell the brewery and leave the ever more competitive brewing industry to focus on its other ventures like its successful real estate company.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

Tags:

Remember?? “WESTERN AIRLINES, THE ONLY WAY TO FLY” 1-minute TV COMMERCIAL 1950s – 1960s ANIMATED

Remember?? “WESTERN AIRLINES, THE ONLY WAY TO FLY” 1-minute TV COMMERCIAL 1950s – 1960s ANIMATED

Western Airlines

Western Airlines

Western Airlines (IATA: WA, ICAO: WAL, Call sign: Western) was a large airline based in California, with operations throughout the western United States including Alaska and Hawaii, and western Canada, as well as to New York City, Boston, Washington D.C. and Miami on the U.S. east coast and also into Mexico. The airline also served other international destinations such as London, England and Nassau, Bahamas during its existence. Western had hubs at Los Angeles International Airport, Salt Lake City International Airport, and the former Stapleton International Airport in Denver. Before it merged with Delta Air Lines it was headquartered at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX).[2] The company’s slogan for many years was “Western Airlines….The Only Way To Fly!”

History
In 1925, the United States Postal Service began to give airlines contracts to carry air mail throughout the country. Western Airlines first incorporated in 1925 as Western Air Express by Harris Hanshue. It applied for, and was awarded, the 650-mile long Contract Air Mail Route #4 (CAM-4) from Salt Lake City, Utah to Los Angeles. On 17 April 1926, Western’s first flight took place with a Douglas M-2 airplane.[3] It began offering passenger services a month later, when the first commercial passenger flight took place at Woodward Field. Ben F. Redman (then president of the Salt Lake City Chamber of Commerce) and J.A. Tomlinson perched atop U.S. mail sacks and flew with pilot C.N. “Jimmy” James on his regular eight-hour mail delivery flight to Los Angeles.

Transcontinental &Western Airlines
The company reincorporated in 1928 as Western Air Express Corp. Then, in 1930, purchased Standard Air Lines, subsidiary of Aero Corp. of Ca. founded in 1926 by Paul E. Richter, Jack Frye and Walter Hamilton. WAE with Fokker aircraft merged with Transcontinental Air Transport to form Trans World Airlines (TWA).

General Air Lines
In 1934, Western Air Express was severed from TWA and briefly changed its name to General Air Lines, returning to the name Western Air Express after several months. In a 1934 press release by the company, it called itself the Western Air Division of General Air Lines.[4]

Western Airlines
In 1941 Western Air Express changed its name to Western Air Lines (WAL) and later to Western Airlines. The carrier also billed itself as Western Airlines International at one point. During the 1940s, Western acquired a controlling interest in Inland Air Lines, which operated as a subsidiary with this air carrier’s schedules appearing in Western system timetables at the time before Inland was fully merged into Western during the early 1950s.[5] After World War II, Western was awarded a route from Los Angeles to Denver via Las Vegas, but financial problems forced Western to sell the route as well as Douglas DC-6 new aircraft delivery positions to United Air Lines in 1947. Western was later awarded a route between Minneapolis and Salt Lake City via Casper, Wyoming, thus allowing the airline to develop from a large regional airline into a major mainline air carrier. This growth also enabled the airline to introduce Douglas DC-6 (DC-6B models), Lockheed L-188 Electra turboprops and eventually Boeing 707 jet service. The airline’s president was Terrell “Terry” Drinkwater. Drinkwater got into a dispute with the administration in Washington D.C. that severely hampered WAL’s growth. Pressured in a famous phone call by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to “buy American made aircraft”, Drinkwater reportedly responded: “Mr. President, you run your country and let me run my airline!” For years after this exchange, the federal Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB) would not award Western new routes while their major competitors including United and American grew enormous even though all of Western’s airliners were of U.S. manufacture while their competitor’s fleets included aircraft that had been built in Europe by British or French companies.

A restoration of a Convair 240 sports a Western Airlines paint scheme.
In August 1953 Western was serving 38 airports. By June 1968, that number had only grown to 42 airports.

Western entered the jet age in 1960 when it introduced Boeing 707 jetliners (B707-139 models) with flights between Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland, OR and Seattle. In 1967 WAL acquired Pacific Northern Airlines, which served the state of Alaska from Anchorage and Seattle. In the late 1960s Western aimed for an all-jet fleet, adding Boeing 707-320s, 727-200s and 737-200s to their fleet of 720Bs. The two leased B707-139s had previously been removed from the fleet in favor of the turbofan powered Boeing 720B. Lockheed L-188 Electra turboprops were then replaced with new Boeing 737-200s.

In 1973 Western added nine McDonnell Douglas DC-10-10s, marketing their wide-body cabins as “DC-10 Spaceships”. These aircraft had seating for 46 first class passengers and 193 in coach, and a lower level galley for food preparation.[6]

Boeing 720B with the old livery at Seattle 1972

Western Airlines Boeing 727
Western was headquartered in Los Angeles, California. Following the Airline Deregulation Act in 1978, the airline’s principal hubs underwent an evolution and were eventually reduced to hub operations at just two airports: Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) and Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC). Prior to airline deregulation, Western operated smaller hubs in Anchorage, Alaska (ANC), Denver (DEN), Las Vegas (LAS), Minneapolis/St. Paul (MSP) and San Francisco (SFO).[7] By the spring of 1987 shortly before Western was acquired by Delta Air Lines, the airline operated only two hubs with a major operation in Salt Lake City and a secondary hub in Los Angeles.

At their peak in the 1970s and 1980s Western flew to many cities across the western United States, and to Mexico (Mexico City, Puerto Vallarta, Acapulco, Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo and Mazatlán), Alaska (Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, Ketchikan, Kodiak and other Alaskan destinations), Hawaii (Honolulu, Kahului, Kona, and Hilo), and Canada (Vancouver, Calgary and Edmonton). New York City, Washington, D.C., Boston and Miami were added on the east coast as well as Chicago and St. Louis in the midwest, and also destinations in Texas (Austin, Dallas/Ft. Worth, El Paso, Houston and San Antonio). Western also operated numerous intrastate flights within California, competing with Pacific Southwest Airlines (PSA), Air California/AirCal, Air West/Hughes Airwest and United Airlines. In addition, Western operated “Islander” service with Boeing 707-320, Boeing 720B and McDonnell Douglas DC-10 jetliners to Hawaii from a number of mainland U.S. cities in its route system that previously did not have direct flights to the 50th state. In 1973, the airline was operating nonstop “Islander” service between Honolulu and Anchorage, Los Angeles, Oakland, CA, San Diego, San Francisco and San Jose, CA with one stop, no change of plane “Islander” flights being operated between Honolulu and Las Vegas, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Phoenix, Sacramento and Salt Lake City.[8] In 1981, the airline was also operating nonstop DC-10 jet service between Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and Honolulu as well.[9]

One of the airline’s smallest jet service destinations was West Yellowstone, Montana, located near Yellowstone National Park. Western operated seasonal service into West Yellowstone Airport during the summer months with Boeing 737-200 jetliners, which had replaced Lockheed L-188 Electra turboprop service into this small airfield. During the 1970s and 1980s, Western served a number of small cities in the western U.S. with Boeing 737-200 jet service including Butte, MT, Casper, WY, Cheyenne, WY, Helena, MT, Idaho Falls, ID, Pierre, SD, Pocatello, ID, Rapid City, SD and Sheridan, WY. The 737 replaced Electra propjet service to all of these destinations. Western also used its larger jetliners to serve other small communities as well: in 1968, the airline was operating nonstop Boeing 720B service between the Annette Island Airport serving Ketchikan, Alaska and Seattle, and in 1973 was flying the 720B nonstop between Kodiak, Alaska and Seattle.[10][11]

In the late 1970s Western Airlines (WAL) and Continental Airlines (CAL) agreed to merge. A dispute broke out over what to call the combined airline: Western-Continental or Continental-Western. An infamous coin toss occurred. Bob Six, the colorful founder of CAL, demanded that Continental be “tails” in deference to their marketing slogan “We Really Move Our Tail for You! Continental Airlines: the Proud Bird with the Golden Tail”. The coin flip turned up “heads”. Six was so disappointed he called the merger off.[citation needed]

In 1981 Western Airlines began international flights from Anchorage and Denver to London Gatwick Airport with a single McDonnell Douglas DC-10-30 intercontinental wide body jetliner.[12] At one point as an extension of the service to the U.K., Western operated one stop, no change of plane DC-10-30 flights on the polar route between Honolulu and London via a stop in Anchorage. The London to Denver DC-10-30 flight featured continuing no change of plane service to Las Vegas and Los Angeles with the same routing being flown in reverse. Another international route at this time was one stop, no change of plane service between Los Angeles and Nassau, Bahamas, which was flown with a DC-10 via a stop in Miami. As Western extended its network to destinations on the east coast such as New York City, Washington, D.C. and Boston, as well as to Chicago and St. Louis in the midwest, Albuquerque and El Paso in the west, and Houston, New Orleans, Miami and Fort Lauderdale in the south; the airline thus became a prominent sponsor of the Bob Barker television show The Price Is Right in order to make potential customers in the eastern U.S. more aware of their new presence and routes.

Western Express
During the late 1980s, Western entered into a code sharing agreement with SkyWest Airlines, which was an independent and growing commuter air carrier at the time. SkyWest operated Embraer EMB-120 Brasilia and Fairchild Swearingen Metroliner turboprop aircraft as Western Express providing passenger feed to and from Western mainline flights at Salt Lake City, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Phoenix, San Diego and other Western mainline destinations[13] In the spring of 1987, SkyWest operating as Western Express was serving 36 destinations in Arizona, California, Colorado, Montana, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. Western also entered a similar code sharing agreement with Alaska-based South Central Air, a small commuter airline that operated as Western Express as well, providing passenger feed to and from Western flights serving Anchorage. Several destinations in southern Alaska including Homer, Kenai, Soldotna were served by South Central Air operating as Western Express.[14] Following the acquisition of Western by Delta Air Lines, SkyWest became a Delta Connection code sharing air carrier.[15]

Delta Air Lines merger
In the early 1980s, Air Florida tried to buy Western Airlines, but they were able to purchase only 16 percent of the airline’s stock. Finally, on September 9, 1986 Western Airlines and Delta Air Lines entered into an agreement and plan of merger. The merger agreement was approved by the United States Department of Transportation on December 11, 1986. On December 16, 1986, shareholder approval of the merger was conferred and Western Airlines became a wholly owned subsidiary of Delta. The Western brand was discontinued and the employee workforces were fully merged on April 1, 1987. All of Western’s aircraft were repainted in Delta’s livery, including ten McDonnell Douglas DC-10 wide body trijets. Delta eventually decided to eliminate the DC-10s from the combined fleet as they already operated a considerable number of Lockheed L-1011 TriStar wide body jetliners—a similar type when compared with the DC-10. Western’s former Salt Lake City hub has become a major Delta hub, and Delta currently uses Los Angeles International Airport as a major gateway and hub as well.

 

Tags:

The Love of Life (1955)

The Love of Life (1955)

​Roy Winsor

Starring Audrey Peters

Ron Tomme

Country of origin United States

Original language(s) English

No. of seasons 29

No. of episodes 7,316

Production

Running time 15 minutes (1951–1958)

30 minutes (1958–1962, 1969–1973, 1979–1980)

25 minutes (1962–1969, 1973–1979)

Release

Original network CBS

Picture format Black-and-white

(1951–1967)

Color

(1967–1980)

Audio format Monaural


Original release September 24, 1951 – February 1, 1980

Love of Life is an American soap opera which aired on CBS from September 24, 1951, to February 1, 1980. It was created by Roy Winsor, whose previous creation Search for Tomorrow had premiered three weeks before Love of Life, and who would go on to create The Secret Storm two and a half years later.

Production 

Love of Life originally came from Liederkranz Hall on East 58th Street in Manhattan. Mike and Buff (Mike Wallace), Ernie Kovacs, and Douglas Edwards and the News, as well as Search for Tomorrow and The Guiding Light also came from that location. The program originated at other studios in Manhattan, but primarily at the CBS Broadcast Center on West 57th Street and CBS’ Studio 52 behind the Ed Sullivan Theater. In 1975, the series moved to make way for a nightclub that became known as Studio 54. Until its final episode in 1980, Love of Life was taped in Studio 44 at the CBS Broadcast Center.

Format 

Unlike most other soap operas, Love of Life was originally not split up into segments dictated by commercial breaks. Because the show was owned by packaged-goods giant American Home Products and merely licensed to CBS, all commercials were for AHP brands, and occurred before or after the show. In the 1960s, one commercial break was allotted around the middle of the program, but this was mostly to allow affiliates to reconnect with the feed after airing local commercials. Love of Life adopted the “five segments per half-hour” standard in the 1970s.

On April 23, 1979, CBS moved Love of Life to the 4:00/3:00 pm slot that had opened when Match Game was canceled. For this slot, episodes again had a full 30-minute duration, accommodating the whole slot. However, ratings plummeted upon relocating; an increasing number of CBS affiliates pre-empted the serial to show more profitable syndicated programming. Beginning in September 1979, in some markets, this included a new daily syndicated version of the Match Game, which went up against (and, in some cases, was shown in place of) Love of Life.

Despite CBS moving the show to the 4:00/3:00 timeslot, some affiliates chose to air it at earlier timeslots in pattern with the other soaps. For example, in Indianapolis, then-CBS affiliate WISH-TV aired Love of Life at 3:30 (Eastern) while airing One Day at a Time reruns at 4:00. Many West Coast stations, such as KNXT (now KCBS-TV) in Los Angeles, did this, as well, keeping Love of Life in tandem with the other soaps by airing it at 2:30 Pacific time, after Guiding Light. Other stations, such as then-O&O KMOX-TV (now KMOV) in St. Louis, kept the show in late morning at 11:00 (Central). Additionally, WUSA (then WDVM) in Washington, DC, chose to keep Love of Life at 11:30 while pre-empting The Price is Right. In the soap’s home market of New York City, WCBS-TV aired it at noon.

Within 10 months, CBS realized that the 4:00 slot would not work for Love of Life in light of affiliate tape-delays and pre-emptions, and subsequently cancelled the show. Its final episode aired on February 1, 1980. The following Monday, The Young and the Restless expanded to an hour, with One Day at a Time moving into the 4:00/3:00 timeslot. According to rumors, once CBS cancelled Love of Life, they intended to use the show’s New York studio space for the 1980 Winter Olympics, which took place later that month in Lake Placid, New York.

Director Larry Auerbach said that he lamented the network’s 4:00/3:00 slot choice on the CBS Evening News the day Love of Life finished airing, feeling that the slot was better suited to airing shows that appealed to kids after school.



en.m.wikipedia.org



 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 31, 2017 in classic television

 

Tags: ,

THE FABULOUS 52 

Film students and movie buffs everywhere are searching for the lost music and history compositions of The Fabulous 52.  

The Fabulous 52 aired each Saturday night (11:30) on KNXT’s Channel 2 ( late 1950s/Los Angeles)  showing its big, bold  title superimposed upon the well-lit, KNXT/CBS studio.   Who can forget the spot-aerial lights that stretched out  into the starry night skies?

A beautiful orchestra flaired  an unknown but unforgettable, classical, opening theme.  Both the music and studio imagery gave prominence to many of Hollywood’s greatest  performances.  The Fabulous 52  is remembered as a most impressive television,  feature film presentation of the late 1950s.   

~~~~

Referencing  “Broadcasting Telecasting (Jan-Mar 1959), ” Tv Movie Missionary • Starlet, Sandy Warner holds up some of the Paramount footage KNXT (TV) Los Angeles charged her with promoting for a movie splash starting this week. 

To herald 12 major motion pictures premiering on KNXT, “Miss Paramount Week” has been calling on  the press, riding in holiday parades, appearing at public functions and posing for lots of pictures. 

Backing up its front woman, KNXT sent up a plane over the New Year’s Day Rose Bowl parade with an exclusive sky-writing franchise to reach an expected 1.5 million parade watchers. Also in the Paramount Week promotion kit:  $50,000 worth of air promotion time, 18,000 lines in local newspapers, four pages in Tv Guide, giant bus posters, market cards, direct mail, bottle labels, billboards and a full- scale publicity campaign in newspapers and magazines. 

The 12 Paramount Week features are being shown on the weeknight Early Show and Big Hit Movies, Saturday’s Fabulous 52 show and a Sunday film program. 

Paramount Week movies star: Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Fredric March, Herbert Marshall, Barbara Stanwyck, Jack Benny, Fred MacMurray, Claudette Colbert, Marlene Dietrich and others. Each and every feature film in this distinguished group offers a sales and rating dream and top-flight stars of first-rate pictures: 

  • CALL NORTHSIDE 777 

Richard  Conte 

  • MOTHER WORE TIGHTS 

Betty Grable, Dan Dailey 

  • THE RAINS CAME 

Tyrone Power, Myrna Loy 

  • HEAVEN CAN WAIT 

Gene Tierney, Don Ameche 

  • CALL OF THE WILD 

Clark Gable, Loretta Young 

  • ROAD TO GLORY 

Fredric March, Lionel Barrymore, James Stewart, Lee J. Cobb


For the full story,
get in touch today with . . .
MTA NATIONAL TELEFILM

HI H ASSOCIATES, INC., 10 Columbus Circle. New York 19 

https://archive.org/stream/broadcastingtele56unse/broadcastingtele56unse_djvu.txt

 

Tags:

 “The Untouchables – 1959 – TV Series – ABC” 

Genre Crime drama

Starring Robert Stack

Abel Fernandez

Nicholas Georgiade

Paul Picerni

Steve London

Bruce Gordon

Neville Brand

Narrated by Walter Winchell

Theme music composer Nelson Riddle

Composer(s) Bill Loose

Jack Cookerly

Nelson Riddle

Country of origin United States

Original language(s) English

No. of seasons 4

No. of episodes 118 & two-part pilot (list of episodes)

Production

Executive producer(s) Alan A. Armer

Desi Arnaz

Leonard Freeman

Quinn Martin

Jerry Thorpe

Producer(s) Alan A. Armer

Alvin Cooperman

Walter Grauman

Bert Granet

Paul Harrison

Herman Hoffman

Sidney Marshall

Vincent McEveety

Del Reisman

Norman Retchin

Lloyd Richards

Stuart Rosenberg

Charles Russell

Josef Shaftel

Cinematography Robert B. Hauser

Glen MacWilliams

Charles Straumer

Camera setup Single-camera

Running time 50 minutes

Production company(s) Desilu Productions

Langford Productions

Distributor Desilu Sales (until 1967)

Paramount Domestic Television (1967–2006)

CBS Paramount Domestic Television (2006–2007)

CBS Television Distribution (2007– )

Release

Original network ABC

Picture format Black-and-white

Audio format Monaural

Original release October 15, 1959 – May 21, 1963


The Untouchables is an American crime drama that ran from 1959 to 1963 on the ABC Television Network, produced by Desilu Productions. Based on the memoir of the same name by Eliot Ness and Oscar Fraley, it fictionalized Ness’ experiences as a Prohibition agent, fighting crime in Chicago in the 1930s with the help of a special team of agents handpicked for their courage, moral character, and incorruptibility, nicknamed the Untouchables. The book was later made into a film in 1987 (also called The Untouchables) by Brian De Palma, with a script by David Mamet, and a second, less-successful TV series in 1993.

A powerful, dynamic, hard-hitting action drama, and a landmark crime series,[1] The Untouchables won series star Robert Stack an Emmy Award for Best Actor in a Dramatic Series in 1960.[2]
en.m.wikipedia.org


If video is blocked, view on youtube! Should this persists, please report to source.

 

Tags:

 
%d bloggers like this: