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MY LITTLE MARGIE

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My Little Margie

premiered on CBS as the summer replacement for I Love Lucy on June 16, 1952, under the sponsorship of Philip Morris cigarettes (when the series moved to NBC for its third season in the fall of 1953, Scott Paper Company became its sponsor). In an unusual move, the series—with the same leads—aired original episodes on CBS Radio, concurrently with the TV broadcasts, from December 1952 through August 1955. Only 23 radio broadcasts are known to exist in recorded form.

SYNOPSIS

Set in New York City, the series stars Gale Storm as 21-year-old Margie Albright and former silent film star Charles Farrell as her widowed father, 50-year-old Vern Albright. They share an apartment at the Carlton Arms Hotel. Vern Albright is the vice-president of the investment firm of Honeywell and Todd, where his bosses are George Honeywell (Clarence Kolb) and Todd (George Meader). Roberta Townsend (Hillary Brooke) is Vern’s girlfriend, and Margie’s boyfriend is Freddy Wilson (Don Hayden). Mrs. Odetts (played by Gertrude Hoffmann on TV, Verna Felton on radio) is the Albrights’ next-door neighbor and Margie’s sidekick in madcap capers reminiscent of Lucy and Ethel in I Love Lucy. When Margie realizes she has blundered or gotten into trouble, she makes an odd trilling sound. Michael Richards of Seinfeld cites this as the inspiration for the occasional odd vocal utterances of his character on the program.

Other cast members include Willie Best, who plays the elevator operator, Dian Fauntelle, and silent film star Zasu Pitts. Scottish actor Andy Clyde, prior to The Real McCoys, appears in the 1954 episode, “Margie and the Bagpipes.”

My Little Margie

finished at #29 in the Nielsen ratings for the 1954-1955 television season[1] and, even more impressively, at #6 in Nielsen’s radio estimates for the 1954-55 season.[2] Despite this success, the series was canceled in 1955. Gale Storm went on to star in The Gale Storm Show which ran for 143 episodes from 1956-1960. Zasu Pitts joined Gale Storm in this series too, originally entitled Oh! Susanna.

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Watch “(1952) My Little Margie The Missing Link” on YouTube

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“Doris Troy – Just One Look”

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Just One Look” is a song co-written by American R&B singers Doris Troy and Gregory Carroll. The recording by Doris Troy was a hit in 1963. The Hollies, Anne Murray and Linda Ronstadt recorded hit versions of their own. There have also been many other versions of this song.

Doris Troy version

Background
Details vary as to how the Doris Troy version came to be released on Atlantic Records. According to the book Billboard Book of One-Hit Wonders,[2] James Brown saw Troy performing in a nightclub (under her then-stage name Doris Payne), and introduced her to Atlantic.[3] According to a more recent and detailed story in Soulful Divas,[4] Payne recorded a studio demo of the song and took it to Sue Records first, but their lack of response led her to offer it to Jerry Wexler at Atlantic, where the label released the demo unchanged. The personnel on this song included Horace Ott on Piano, Snags Allen on guitar, Barney Richmond on bass and Bruno Carr on drums (although legendary session musician Bernard Purdie has claimed that he was the actual drummer on the demo).[3]

Reception
In 1963, Doris Troy scored her only hit on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart with “Just One Look”. The song spent 14 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at No. 10,[5] while reaching No. 3 on Billboard ’​s Hot R&B Singles chart,[6] No. 8 on New Zealand’s “Lever Hit Parade”,[7] and No. 1 on Canada’s CHUM Hit Parade.[8] The single’s release was the first time she started using “Doris Troy” as her stage name, though her pen name remained Doris Payne.[3]

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“BEAUTY SECRETS Of The 1950’s! (w/selected highlights)”

“BEAUTY SECRETS Of The 1950’s! (w/selected highlights)”

What Your 1950s Beauty Routine Would Have Looked Like, According To Judy Blume

By COURTNEY MINA 

In these modern times, we have arguably developed a great love for all things vintage: Vintage clothing, vintage shoes, vintage hairstyles, and even vintage furniture. You may be someone who has the vintage “look” down pat, but have you ever wondered what a vintage ’50s beauty routine would actually be like? I have been reading Judy Blume’s most recent novel in the Unlikely Event.

The story takes place in the early 1950s, focusing on the lives of several people affected by the plane crashes that took place in Elizabeth, New Jersey at the time. In between all of the “unlikely events” that occur, the book does a wonderful job of providing all sorts of little details about life in the ’50s, including ones about the lead female protagonist’s shopping and beauty routines.

Personally, I was amazed to realize just how different things were back then. I mean, sure, we may achieve the same “vintage look and style” in 2015 as they did back then (think pinup dresses, dramatic winged eyeliner, and red lips Marilyn Monroe-style) but the actual methods, routines, and products we use are extremely different today than those of the actual ’50s. Since a lot of us possess a love for all things retro, let’s take a look at seven examples of what your beauty and shopping routine would look like if you lived in the ’50s, according to Judy Blume.

1. Baths And All-Purpose Soap Bars

A lot of us hop into the shower first thing in the morning. If you lived in the ’50s, however, Blume’s books imply that you’d most likely be taking a bath instead. Forget using your special soaps from your favorite mall shop as well. You’d most likely be using an  all-purpose bar soap (Palmolive, Sunlight, or a Fels-Naptha soap bar, to name a few) to rinse away the daily grime. These bars were also used for laundry, believe it or not

2. Primp And Powder

When it came to makeup, there was no Ulta available for you to pick up your liquid foundation and contouring set at. Instead, you’d probably be purchasing an all-in-one base and powder in a compact form. According to the Hair And Makeup Artist Handbook, Max Factor, Revlon, Pond, and Avon were the most popular skincare and cosmetic brands at the time.

Most likely, you’d also own a Volupté compact: A decorated compact case that contained powder and a puff. A little blush, winged eyeliner (if you were going for a glamorous look), mascara, and a shade of red lipstick (none of the crazy colors we rock today) would have been applied to your face to complete the perfect look.

3. A Wondrous Wardrobe

If you lived in the ’50s, your closet was likely filled with cardigans and sweater sets, blouses with embroidered collars, dresses with ballerina-length hems and cinched waists (for an hourglass look), pencil skirts, pleated shorts, saddle shoes (also known as “casual Oxfords”), heels (for dressier occasions), pantyhose, nylons, slips, girdles, and a pair of cat-eye glasses or two. It’s possible that your clothing would also be made of natural materials, such as cotton and/or wool. Looking “glamorous” was all the rage, so you would frequently dress to present in a “put together” kind of way.

4. Department Store Shopway

In the ’50s, “malls” weren’t really a thing yet. According to The Guardian, the first mall ever built in America was actually the Southdale Shopping Center in Edina, Minnesota, which opened in 1956. Chances are that back in the ’50s you would have shopped at independently owned stores near where you lived.

For a more elevated shopping experience, however, department stores were much more popular. These were usually located in the downtown area of larger cities, and visiting one would likely feel much more like an “outing” and a “treat” than it does today.

5. Lingerie Stores

Back in the day, folks didn’t have quite as an elaborate selection of bras and underwear as we do today. Young girls mainly wore plain, white cotton bras and underwear that you would buy from the department store. However, women of the ’50s were in love with with glamour and the hourglass waist look, so corsets and girdles were extremely popular, along with silk slips and nylons. If you wanted to buy any of these items, you had to head over to a special lingeriestore (which sold more glamorous undergarments) to buy a half slip for $3.99.

6. Spend Your Evening In A Nightgown

After you took off your saddle shoes, clothing, nylons, and girdle at the end of the day, chances are you’d slip into something much more comfortable: A Lanz nightgown, which was all the rage and the “nighttime fashion” of the time.
                                                                                        7. Set Your Curls

The most popular way to style your hair was cut short or just above the shoulders, worn lose and glamorously waved, or curled (think bob, bubble cut, poodle cut, bouffant, pageboy or pixie cut). Most women would set their hair in curlers and sleep with them in overnight, either using foam, pin, or rag rollers. Some would even cover their hair with a cap to protect the locks while they slept. Others still would simply try to sleep as still as they possibly could.Well, it certainly takes a lot to be glamorous. Some things never change.
Source:  https://www.bustle.com/articles/99305-what-your-1950s-beauty-routine-would-have-looked-like-according-to-judy-blume

Images: The Weinstein Company (2); Pixabay (1); 20th Century Fox (1); AMC (2); Paramount Pictures (1); Mirisch Company (1)

 

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“What’s My Line? – Carol Burnett; Cyril Ritchard [panel] (May 7, 1961)”

Main Rounds

In each What’s My Line? game, a contestant would enter the stage and sign in his/her name, by virtue of the host saying, “Will you enter & sign in please?” After that, he/she sat down at a desk next to the host. The game would begin by having the home audience be shown what’s his/her line, and the host afterwards told the panel a clue which is usually “deals in a service” or “self-employed”, something like those. Now the panelists in turn asked yes-or-no questions to the contestant which would hopefully lead to the right line. Each time the panelist in control got a yes answer, his/her turn continued, but if at any time the panelist in control got a no answer, he/she loses his/her turn and control passed to the next panelist in line; the contestant will also receive $5. Upon a no answer, the host would say the famous catchphrase “# down, # to go” (Ex: 2 down, 8 to go). Sometimes a question would have the host make a brief explanation which can lead to either a yes or no answer. A panelist can be allowed to pass his/her turn without penalty; other times the panel can call a conference. If the panel can guess the right line, they won the game, but if they got ten no answers, the contestant stumped the panel and won the game and a maximum total of $50. Often, the host would throw the cards over (end the game) when time was running short or any other reason.

In the syndicated run, the contestant would demonstrate or perform the product or service in question.

http://gameshows.wikia.com/wiki/

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“Over The Mountain, Across The Sea – Johnnie & Joe”

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Johnnie & Joe were an American R&B vocal duo from The Bronx, who were best known for their 1957 hit “Over the Mountain; Across the Sea.”

Johnnie Louise Richardson (June 29, 1935, Montgomery, Alabama – October 25, 1988, New York City)[1] and Joe Rivers (March 20, 1937, Charleston, South Carolina[2]) began singing together in 1957 and released several singles on Chess Records,[3] which were leased from J & S Records, to whom the duo were under contract. Richardson was the daughter of the J&S label owner, Zelma “Zell” Sanders, who had been a touring member of The Hearts.[2]

Three of the songs hit the U.S. singles charts. “Over the Mountain, Across the Sea”, written by Rex Garvin, went to #3 on the R&B chart and #8 on the Billboard Hot 100,[4] and “I’ll Be Spinning”, written by Freddie Scott, went Top 10 R&B, both in 1957.[3][5] “My Baby’s Gone”, a #15 R&B hit, was their last,[3] although “Over the Mountain, Across the Sea” returned to the pop charts in 1960, peaking at #89 the second time around.[4]

Richardson and Rivers resumed their professional partnership later in the 1960s. During the 1970s and 80s they performed in oldies concerts, and made a critically acclaimed album, Kingdom of Love, in 1982.[6] Johnnie Richardson died of complications from a stroke in 1988.

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A SHIRLEY TEMPLE CHRISTMAS SEASON

One of her most renowned films about the Christmas season, is Heidi. Audiences were tsken through an emotional journey with orphaned Heidi (Shirley Temple) under the guardianship of a careless aunt and a harsh, distant grandfather. Heidi overcomes all loveliness encounters with her ability love freely.

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ABOUT SHIRLEY TEMPLE AMERICA’S SWEETHEART

Shirley Temple Black (née Temple; April 23, 1928 – February 10, 2014) was an American film and television actress, singer, dancer, and public servant, most famous as Hollywood’s number-one box-office star from 1935 through 1938. As an adult, she entered politics and became a diplomat, serving as United States Ambassador to Ghana and later to Czechoslovakia, and as Chief of Protocol of the United States.

Temple began her film career in 1932 at the age of three. In 1934, she found international fame in Bright Eyes, a feature film designed specifically for her talents. She received a special Juvenile Academy Award in February 1935 for her outstanding contribution as a juvenile performer to motion pictures during 1934, and film hits such as Curly Top and Heidi followed year after year during the mid-to-late 1930s. Licensed merchandise that capitalized on her wholesome image included dolls, dishes, and clothing. Her box-office popularity waned as she reached adolescence.[1] She appeared in a few films of varying quality in her mid-to-late teens, and retired completely from films in 1950 at the age of 22. She was the top box-office draw in Hollywood for four years in a row (1935–38) in a Motion Picture Herald poll.[2][3]

Temple returned to show business in 1958 with a two-season television anthology series of fairy tale adaptations. She made guest appearances on television shows in the early 1960s and filmed a sitcom pilot that was never released. She sat on the boards of corporations and organizations including The Walt Disney Company, Del Monte Foods and the National Wildlife Federation. She began her diplomatic career in 1969, with an appointment to represent the United States at a session of the United Nations General Assembly. In 1988, she published her autobiography, Child Star.[4]

Temple was the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the Kennedy Center Honors and a Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award. She ranks 18th on the American Film Institute’s list of the greatest female American screen legends of Classic Hollywood cinema.

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Source:  https://m.facebook.com/daniel.titsworth?fref=nf

 

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“Keep Away From A Runaround Sue.”

“Keep Away From A Runaround Sue.”

Who Was Dion?

Dion was a teen idol during the 1950s and early to mid-1960s.  There was no real competition between Dion, Elvis Presley, Fabian and other famed youth attractions, Dion held his own audience… But then came Beatle Mania and the minds of star-struck WENT crazy.
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Runaround Sue” is a pop song, in a doo-wop style, originally a US No. 1 hit for the singer Dion during 1961 after he split with the Belmonts. The song ranked No. 342 on the Rolling Stone list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time”.[3] The song was written by Dion with Ernie Maresca, and tells the story of a disloyal lover.

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Watch “1961 Dion- on YouTube

 

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