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Category Archives: classic television

Aside

hotrods to hell

Hot Rods to Hellis a 1967 suspense film.[2] It was director John Brahm’s last film.[3]

Background and production

The film was originally intended for television release, and was in fact shot in the 4:3 “full-screen” aspect ratio that persisted on television for decades even after film had long since gone to wide-screen aspect ratios of 1.65:1, 1.85:1 and 2.35:1. When the project was finished, however, the producers deemed it too intense for television and released it to theaters (including drive-in theaters) instead, with a runtime of 92 minutes.[citation needed]

Based originally on a Saturday Evening Post story, the movie project originally had the title 52 Miles to Terror[4]

Eventually, ABC-TV bought the broadcast rights and exhibited the film on their ABC Sunday Night Movie series in 1968. Unaccountably, they used a print having a runtime of 100 minutes. When Turner Classic Movies bought the rights to MGM’s extensive film library, they acquired the 100-minute print.

Plot

Traveling salesman Tom Phillips (Dana Andrews) is driving home to Boston, Massachusetts for Christmas when he encounters a drunken driver on a rain-streaked road. He cannot avoid a collision, and is hospitalized with spinal damage. Since he cannot be a traveling salesman anymore, his brother arranges for Tom to buy a remote motel in the desert town of Mayville, California. Tom is reluctant, since he has never been an innkeeper before—but in the end he decides that he must travel in order to get as far away from the site of his accident as possible, as soon as possible.

So Tom sets out for California with his wife, teen-aged daughter, and son. But when they reach the desert they are accosted by a pair of drag racers and a “party girl” in a modified, high-performance 1958 Chevrolet Corvette who jokingly force them to swerve and avoid a collision.

This is only the first of a series of escalating encounters with the local youth. Teenaged children of relatively well-off local farmers, they are apparently given “everything they want” but are still bored and are locked in a never-ending desire for “kicks” in which they will never be satisfied. The adults, including the owner of a local filling station, are fed-up with them. One of these adults, however, turns out to own the very motel that Tom Phillips has bought—and he is selling out after having let the wayward youth use his motel as an illicit trysting place for years.

When Tom tells the filling-station owner that he has “just bought himself a motel,” one of the kids, named Ernie (Gene Kirkwood), overhears. Soon after, he tells his friend Duke (Paul Bertoya), who is the driver of the Corvette. Duke organizes a campaign of harassment against Tom and chases the hapless family all the way to the motel.

Matters come to a dangerous head when Tom’s daughter (Laurie Mock), fascinated by Duke, goes to see him in the motel bar and grill, called the “Arena.” Duke’s current girlfriend Gloria (Mimsy Farmer), in a jealous rage, informs Tom, who tries to strangle Duke—but his back goes out and he must desist. He then informs the former motel owner (George Ives) that he will not go through with the sale. This causes a confrontation between the former owner and the youths, which ends when the owner tells Duke and Ernie that Tom is going to the next town to “bring the police down on this place.”

Duke and Ernie resolve never to let Tom Phillips reach that town—and so, as the family tries to escape, they engage them in a deadly game of “chicken.” This game ends only when Tom outwits the teenagers by parking his car on a narrow bridge, with the headlights on, evacuating him and his family to a safe spot twenty yards off the road. Faced with an unmoving object, Duke turns “chicken” himself, running his car off the edge of the bridge—after which he and Ernie, bruised, battered, and with scraped knees, swear that they will never give Tom any trouble. Tom agrees not to turn them in to the police—but tells them that he will go back to his motel and run it properly from now on.

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https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Ji5t0SiyD8w

Hotrods To Hell (1967?)

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Some Men Will Do The Oddest Things…Just For Fun And At A Price. WATCH: “Tiny Tim – Tip Toe Through The Tulips (Live).mp4” on YouTube

Some Men Will Do The Oddest Things…Just For Fun And At A Price. WATCH: “Tiny Tim – Tip Toe Through The Tulips (Live).mp4” on YouTube

Tiny Tim, Singer, Dies at 64; Flirted, Chastely, With Fame

Tiny Tim, whose quavery falsetto and ukulele made ”Tiptoe Through the Tulips With Me” a novelty hit in 1968, died on Saturday night at the Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis. He was 64 and had lived in Minneapolis for the past year.

By WILLIAM GRIMES
Published: December 2, 1996

April 12, 1932 – November 30, 1996

Tiny Tim

 

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“Mum Deodorant Commercial 1950’s HD”

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The first commercial deodorant, Mum,

was introduced and patented in the late nineteenth century by an inventor in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Edna Murray.[2] The product was briefly withdrawn from the market in the U.S.,[2] but is currently available at U.S. retailers under the brand Ban.[3] The modern formulation of the antiperspirant was patented by Jules Montenier on January 28, 1941.[4] This formulation was first found in “Stopette” deodorant spray, which Time Magazine called “the best-selling deodorant of the early 1950s”.[5] Stopette was later eclipsed by many other brands as the 1941 patent expired.

There is a popular myth that deodorant use is linked to breast cancer, but research has shown no such link exists.[6][7]

History

In 1888, the first commercial deodorant, Mum, was developed and patented by a U.S. inventor in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, whose name has been lost to history.[2] The small company was bought by Bristol-Myers in 1931 and in the late 1940s, Helen Barnett Diserens developed an underarm applicator based on the newly invented ball-point pen.[8][9] In 1952, the company began marketing the product under the name Ban Roll-On.[8][9][10] The product was briefly withdrawn from the market in the U.S.[2] It is once again available at retailers in the U.S. under the brand Ban.[3] In the UK it is sold under the names Mum Solid and Mum Pump Spray.[2] Chattem acquired Ban deodorant brand in 1998[11] and subsequently sold it to Kao Corporation in 2000.[12]

In 1903, the first commercial antiperspirant was Everdry.[1] The modern formulation of the antiperspirant was patented by Jules Montenier on January 28, 1941.[4] This patent addressed the problem of the excessive acidity of aluminium chloride and its excessive irritation of the skin, by combining it with a soluble nitrile or a similar compound.[4] This formulation was first found in “Stopette” deodorant spray, which Time Magazine called “the best-selling deodorant of the early 1950s”.[5] “Stopette” gained its prominence as the first and long-time sponsor of the game show What’s My Line?, and was later eclipsed by many other brands as the 1941 patent expired.

Between 1942 and 1957 the market for deodorants increased 600 times to become a $70 million market. Deodorants were originally marketed primarily to women, but by 1957 the market had expanded to male users, and estimates were that 50% of men were using deodorants by that date. The Ban Roll-On product led the market in sales.[13]

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“Connie Francis – Where The Boys Are (1960 song with lyrics and movie clip)”

“Connie Francis – Where The Boys Are (1960 song with lyrics and movie clip)”

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Where the Boys Are is a song written by Neil Sedaka and Howard Greenfield and first recorded by Connie Francis.

Original version by Connie Francis

Premise
When Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer signed Connie Francis for a major starring rôle in the motion picture Where the Boys Are (based on the novel of the same name by Glendon Swarthout), Francis solicited the services of Neil Sedaka and Howard Greenfield, who had written hit songs for her previously (e. g. “Stupid Cupid”), to write original material for her to perform on the film’s soundtrack including a Where the Boys Are title song.

Sedaka and Greenfield wrote two potential title songs for the film, but producer Joe Pasternak dismissed the song preferred by Francis and the songwriting team. The dismissed version in question was never recorded, not even for demonstration purposes, as Francis (vocal) and Sedaka (piano) had presented both songs as a live performance for Pasternak.[1]

Motion Picture Version
The version chosen by Joe Pasternak was recorded for the first time on July 12, 1960 in Hollywood and was only used when combined to medleys with the overture and closing credits scores written by George E. Stoll.[2]

Original Version 1960
Francis recorded the record version of Where the Boys Are on 18 October 1960[3] in a New York City recording session with Stan Applebaum arranging and conducting. The same session also came up with Francis’ hits Many Tears Ago and Breakin’ in a Brand New Broken Heart as well as the songs On the Outside Looking In, Happy New Year Baby, and Mein Herz weiß genau, was es will, which all would remain unreleased until the 1980s.[1]

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Where the Boys Are


DVD cover by Reynold Brown
Directed by Henry Levin
Produced by Joe Pasternak
Screenplay by George Wells
Based on Where the Boys Are (1960 novel) 
by Glendon Swarthout
Starring Connie Francis
Dolores Hart
Paula Prentiss
George Hamilton
Yvette Mimieux
Jim Hutton
Frank Gorshin
Music by Score:
George E. Stoll
Jazz:
Pete Rugolo
Songs:
Neil Sedaka (music)
Howard Greenfield (lyrics)
Cinematography Robert J. Bronner
Edited by Fredric Steinkamp
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release dates
December 28, 1960
Running time
99 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $2 million[1]
Box office $3.5 million (US rentals)[1]

Where the Boys Are (1960) is an Metrocolor and CinemaScope American coming-of-age comedy film, written by George Wells based on the novel of the same name by Glendon Swarthout, about four Midwestern college co-eds who spend spring break in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The title song “Where the Boys Are” was sung by Connie Francis, who also co-starred in a supporting role. The film was aimed at the teen market, featuring sun, sand and romance. Released in the wintertime, it inspired thousands of additional American college students to head to Fort Lauderdale for their annual spring break.

Where the Boys Are was one of the first teen films to explore adolescent sexuality and the changing sexual morals and attitudes among American college youth. It won Laurel awards for Best Comedy of the Year and Best Comedy Actress (Paula Prentiss).

Plot

The main focus of Where the Boys Are is the “coming of age” of four girl students at a midwestern university during spring vacation. As the film opens, Merritt Andrews (Dolores Hart), the smart and assertive leader of the quartet, expresses the opinion in class that premarital sex might be something young women should experience. Her speech eventually inspires the insecure Melanie Tolman (Yvette Mimieux) to lose her virginity soon after the young women arrive in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Tuggle Carpenter (Paula Prentiss), on the other hand, seeks to be a “baby-making machine,” lacking only the man to join her in marriage. Angie (Connie Francis) rounds out the group as an athletic girl who is clueless when it comes to romance.

The girls find their beliefs challenged throughout the film. Merritt, a freshman, meets the suave rich-boy Ivy Leaguer Ryder Smith (George Hamilton), a senior at Brown, and realizes she’s not ready for sex. Melanie discovers that Franklin (Rory Harrity), a boy from Yale who she thought loved her was only using her for sex. Tuggle quickly fixes her attention on the goofy “TV” Thompson (Jim Hutton), a junior at Michigan State, but becomes disillusioned when he becomes enamored of the older woman Lola Fandango (Barbara Nichols), who works as a “mermaid” swimmer/dancer in a local bar. Angie stumbles into love with the eccentric jazz musician Basil (Frank Gorshin).

Merritt, Tuggle, and Angie’s post-adolescent relationship angst quickly evaporates when they discover Melanie is in distress after going to meet Franklin at a motel and instead finding there another of the “Yalies”, Dill, who rapes her. Franklin had moved on to another girl, but told Dill that Melanie was “easy” and set up the ambush. Melanie ends up walking into the nearby road looking distraught, her dress torn. Just as her friends arrive, she is hit by a car and ends up in the hospital.

Ultimately, it seems the group has learned the potentially serious consequences of their actions and resolve to act in a more responsible, mature manner. The film ends on a melancholy note, with Melanie recovering in the hospital while Merritt looks after her, and with Merritt’s promises to Ryder to continue a long-distance relationship. He then offers to drive them back to their college.

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“The Window” (1949) You’ve Had A Bad Dream!

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An extraordinary film about a little boy who fabricates his daily events (because he is imaginative). But when he later attempts to explain a murder, everyone believes he is once again imagining.

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The Window is a 1949 American black-and-white suspense film noir, based on the short story “The Boy Cried Murder” (reprinted as “Fire Escape”)[4] by Cornell Woolrich.[5] The film, which was a critical success, was produced by Frederic Ullman, Jr. for $210,000 but earned much more, making it a box office hit for RKO Pictures. The film was directed by Ted Tetzlaff, who worked as a cinematographer on over 100 films, including another successful suspense film, Alfred Hitchcock’s Notorious (1946).

Plot

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Set and filmed on location in the tenement section of New York’s Lower East Side, the film tells the story of a young boy, Tommy Woodry (Driscoll), who has a habit of crying wolf. Late one night, he climbs up the building fire escape and sees his two seemingly normal neighbors, Mr and Mrs Kellerson, murder a drunken sailor in their apartment. No one, neither the boy’s parents nor the police, believes young Tommy when he tells them what he has seen, since they all assume that this is just another of the boy’s tall tales.

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When Mrs. Woodry takes Tommy to apologize to the Kellersons, he refuses and they become suspicious of him. When Mrs. Woodry leaves to care for a sick relative and Mr. Woodry is away at his night job, the murderous neighbors plan to kill Tommy who has been locked in his room by his father to prevent further escapades. Under the pretense of going to the police, the Kellersons take Tommy to a dark alley, where they try to kill him. Tommy escapes, but the pair recapture him, taking him back to their apartment in a taxi. Tommy screams at a policeman for help, but the officer remembers Tommy as the boy who came to the station earlier and failed to convince the police. The Kellersons fool the cab driver by posing as Tommy’s parents. Mr. Woodry returns to find Tommy missing. Mr. Woodry asks a police officer for help.

Meanwhile, the Kellersons have Tommy secured in their apartment. Tommy escapes and climbs on the roof pursued by Mr. Kellerson, but Mrs. Kellerson has a change of heart about killing Tommy. The police officer suggests Tommy went to see his mother, and he and Mr. Woodry leave the tenement. Tommy sees his father leave in his car and yells for him, which causes Mr. Kellerson to locate Tommy. The chase resumes with Tommy finding the body of the dead sailor. The upper building starts to collapse. As Mr. Kellerson is about to grab Tommy, a rafter collapses and Kellerson falls to his death. Tommy screams loud enough for neighbors to hear and call the police. The boy is rescued and his parents are proud of him.

window-2.jpg

 

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Aside

coast rabbit

Marian Breland Bailey – Coast Federal Savings TV Commercial (1950s)

Marian Breland Bailey, born Marian Ruth Kruse (December 2, 1920 …. The Buck Bunny commercial featured their trained rabbits for a Coast Federal Savings … and which still holds the record for longest running TV commercial advertisement.

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coast federal savings

Coast Federal Savings TV Commercial (1950s)

 

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JACKIE WILSON, THAT’S WHY I LOVE YOU SO

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Jackie Wilson
Music artist

Jackie Wilson was one of the most important agents of black pop’s transition from R&B into soul. In terms of vocal power, few could outdo him; he was also an electrifying on-stage showman. He was a consistent… wikipedia.org
Born: June 9, 1934, Detroit, Michigan, USA. Died: January 21, 1984, Mount Holly, New Jersey, United States
Cause of Death: Pneumonia
Nationality: United States of America
Spouse: Harlean Harris (m. -1984), Freda Hood (m. -1965)

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