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“I Know Something About Love…. Tell Him”

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The Exciters was an American pop music group of the 1960s. They were originally a girl group, with one male member being added afterwards. At the height of their popularity the group consisted of lead singer Brenda Reid, her husband Herb Rooney, Carolyn Johnson and Lillian Walker.

Career

Brenda Reid, Carolyn (Carol) Johnson, Lillian Walker, and Sylvia Wilbur formed the group while at high school together in Queens, New York City, in 1961. They were originally called the Masterettes, as a sister group to another group called the Masters, and released their first recording, “Follow the Leader”, in early 1962. Wilbur then left the group to be replaced by Penny Carter, and they auditioned for Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, winning a recording contract. Penny Carter then left, and was replaced by Herb Rooney, a member of the Masters; Reid and Rooney later married.[1]

The group’s name was changed to the Exciters, and their first hit record, arranged by George “Teacho” Wiltshire and produced by Leiber and Stoller for United Artists Records, was “Tell Him”, which reached no.4 on the U.S. pop chart in early 1963. The song had previously been recorded unsuccessfully, as “Tell Her”, by Gil Hamilton later known as Johnny Thunder.[2] According to Jason Ankeny at AllMusic, the Exciters’ version of “Tell Him” “…boasted an intensity that signified a sea change in the presentation and perception of femininity in popular music, paving the way for such tough, sexy acts as the Shangri-Las and the Ronettes.”[1]

Dusty Springfield was on a stop-over in New York City en route to Nashville to make a country music album with the Springfields in 1962, when she heard the Exciters’ “Tell Him” playing while taking a late-night walk by the Colony Record Store on Broadway. The song helped Springfield decide to embark on a solo career with a Pop/Soul direction. She’d recall: “The Exciters sort of got you by the throat…out of the blue comes blasting at you “I know something about love”, and that’s it. That’s what I wanna do.”[3]

Other songs by the group included “He’s Got the Power” (written by Ellie Greenwich and Tony Powers), “Get Him”, and Northern Soul classic “Blowing Up My Mind”. The Exciters also recorded “Do-Wah-Diddy”, written by Greenwich and Jeff Barry, in 1963; with a revised title of “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” it was covered shortly after by Manfred Mann, for whom it was an international hit.

In 1965, the Exciters left the Leiber-Stoller management team, and the United Artists label, for Roulette Records. There they issued a remake (with revised lyrics) of the Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers’ song “I Want You to Be My Boy.” They continued to record through the 1960s for Bert Berns’ labels Bang and Shout, and later for RCA, but with little success.[1] Ronnie Pace and Skip McPhee replaced Johnson and Walker.[4] The group broke up in 1974.[2]

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Watch “Exciters 1963” on YouTube

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“Sam Riddle – Hollywood A Go Go – Gazzarri Dancers”

“Sam Riddle – Hollywood A Go Go – Gazzarri Dancers”


Hollywood A Go-Go was a Los Angeles-based music variety show that ran in syndication in the mid-1960s. It was hosted by Sam Riddle, with music by The Sinners and dancing by The Gazzarri Dancers.

The program originated as a local series, Ninth Street West, on KHJ-TV (Channel 9) in 1964. As Hollywood A Go-Go, it was syndicated in early 1965 and ceased production in 1966, with some television stations airing the show as late as the summer of 1966. In its brief run (52 episodes), the show featured well-known acts like Tina Turner, Frankie Lymon, Smokey Robinson & the Miracles, The Challengers, James Brown, Lesley Gore, Fontella Bass, Wilson Pickett, Booker T & The MGs, Bo Diddley, Freddy Cannon, Sonny & Cher, The Bobby Fuller Four, The Fugitives, and Aretha Franklin.

Hollywood A Go-Go was produced at the KHJ-TV studios. Its original syndicator was Four Star Television. Rights to surviving footage of the show (preserved on kinescope film) are now represented by Research Video. The Sinners were the house band featuring Eddie Kaplan on lead guitar.

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Beloved 60s Go-Go Dancer Who Bounced Back After Living On Skid Row Dies

BY JULIET BENNETT RYLAH IN NEWS

June Fairchild (Screenshot from ‘Thunderbolt and Light Foot’)

June Fairchild—an actress, dancer and former Skid Row tenant—has died at 68 of liver cancer. Her life story reveals an interesting slice of Hollywood life in the ’60s, as well as a touching tale of recovery.

Fairchild (real name June Wilson) had an interesting life with the sort of highs and lows you often only see in films. She went to school in Redondo Beach and was the Prom Queen at her high school. She began her career as a dancer, later appeared in several films, fell on rough times and bounced back. She spent her final years living in downtown Los Angeles. She died on Tuesday after a battle with liver cancer, the L.A. Times reports.

Back in the ’60s, there was a show called Hollywood A Go-Go. Though nationally syndicated, the show was hosted by L.A. DJ Sam Riddle and filmed live in Hollywood at the KHJ studios. The show aired on Saturday nights and featured various musical guests. And behind every musical guest was a team of dancers known as The Gazzarri Dancers (notably, they had no connection to the Sunset Strip bar Gazzarri’s). Fairchild was one such dancer and a fan favorite.

Fairchild’s dance career began one night at the bar Gazzarri’s, oddly enough. Producer Al Burton spotted her dancing and offered her a role on Hollywood A Go-Go. At the time, she was dating Three Dog Night’s Danny Hutton. She actually came up with the band’s name after reading about Aborigines who cuddled with their dogs at night for warmth.

Hollywood A Go-Go only aired for two years, but several clips have been archived and posted on YouTube, L.A. Observed notes.

Here’s her dancing with Bob Lind. She’s the girl with the bangs.

Here she is snubbing Lou Rawls.

After the show, Fairchild landed roles in TV and film, including Cheech & Chong’s Up in SmokeThunderbolt and Lightning Footwith Clint Eastwood and Drive, He Said. Here’s her playing a woman who mistakes Ajax for cocaine in Up in Smoke.

However, by 2001, she was homeless on Skid Row. She later spoke on Good Morning America about how she got into drugs, got trapped in two abusive relationships after Hutton and fell into a downward spiral that led to her living in a cardboard box on the streets with an alley cat as her only friend.

Eventually, two friends of Fairchild’s from high school found her while trying to invite her to a class reunion. They helped Fairchild pull out of her dire situation. She continued to live in downtown Los Angeles, and briefly appears in a KCET video about King Eddy. (It’s worth a watch just to reminisce and listen to Ron Swanson-esque then-manger Bill Roller extoll the virtues of microwave food.)

On a website dedicated to the Gazzarri Dancers, Fairchild is memorialized as being “an eternal optimist with a positive spin on whatever life threw her way.” There is a GoFundMe for Fairchild’s memorial here.

Hollywood a Go Go complete show open and close”


Source: http://amp.laist.com/amp/articles/create?article_id=587bbf22dce0cb000158c910

 
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Posted by on February 12, 2018 in classic television, nostalgic

 

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“The Shangri-Las -Leader Of The Pack Video with High Quality Sound”

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The Shangri-Las were an American pop girl group of the 1960s. Between 1964 and 1966 they charted with often heartbreaking teen melodramas, and remain perhaps best known for their hits “Leader of the Pack” and “Remember (Walkin’ in the Sand)”.

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“The Crystals – Then He Kissed Me – New Stereo Remix”

“The Crystals – Then He Kissed Me – New Stereo Remix”

Then He Kissed Me” is a song written by Phil Spector, Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry. The song, produced by Spector, was initially released as a single on Philles Records (#115) in July 1963 by The Crystals. It is a narrative of a young woman’s encounter, romance, and eventual marriage with a fellow youth.

The single is one of The Crystals’ most remembered songs. It was recorded at Gold Star Studios in Los Angeles in April 1963.The lead vocal was sung by Dolores “LaLa” Brooks, the arrangement of The Wrecking Crew‘s Wall of Sound was by Jack Nitzscheand Larry Levine was the engineer. In the United States the single peaked at number six and in the United Kingdom the single peaked at number two. The single was The Crystals’ third single to chart in the top ten in the United States and their second to reach the top ten in the United Kingdom. The song was also a major hit in the Republic of Ireland, reaching number three in the charts there.

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“Ray Charles – Hit The Road Jack (Original)”

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“Hit the Road Jack”

is a song written by rhythm and bluesman Percy Mayfield and first recorded in 1960 as an a cappella demo sent to Art Rupe. It became famous after it was recorded by singer-songwriter-pianist Ray Charles with The Raelettes vocalist Margie Hendricks.

Ray Charles’ recording hit number one for two weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, beginning on Monday, October 9, 1961. “Hit the Road Jack” also got a Grammy Award for Best Rhythm and Blues Recording. The song was also number one on the R&B Sides chart for five weeks, thereby becoming Ray Charles’ sixth number one on that chart. The song is ranked #387 on the Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

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Posted by on February 5, 2018 in 1960s, classic television, nostalgic

 

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“The Duprees – You belong to me”

“The Duprees – You belong to me”
The Duprees are an American musical group of doo-wop style who had a series of hit records in the early 1960s.

Career

The group was founded in the early 1960s in Jersey City, New Jersey, by William L. Dickinson High School students Michael Arnone, Joe Santollo, John Salvato, Tom Bialoglow, and lead singer Joey Canzano (later known as Joey Vann). George Paxton, a former big band leader was impressed by the group’s style and signed them to his Coed Records label. Their first single, “You Belong to Me“, had been a hit for Jo Stafford in 1952. The Duprees’ version was given a big band backing by Paxton and reached the US top ten in 1962.

The group had more top 40 hits in the next few years. “My Own True Love” was a vocal adaptation of “Tara’s Theme” from the soundtrack of Gone with the Wind and became the group’s second hit. “Have You Heard” and “Why Don’t You Believe Me” also reached the Top 40 charts and, like “You Belong to Me,” were originally early 1950s female vocal hits (Joni James, in this case). The group became known for mixing doo-wop vocals with big band arrangements. Tom Bialoglow left in 1963. Mike Kelly, who had recorded on the group’s original demos for George Paxton, replaced Joey Vann as lead vocalist in 1964, and formally left the group in 1977.

In the late 1960s and early 1970s they released an album under the name The Italian Asphalt & Pavement Company (or I. A. P. CO.), and had a minor hit called “Check Yourself.” Mike Arnone kept the group going into the 1980s with Richie Rosato on lead, Al Latta on baritone, Bob Leszczak on first tenor, Bobby Wells on keyboards, and Duane O’Hara on drums. This group lasted from 1981-83.

Joe Santollo died in 1981, Joey Vann died in 1984, and Mike Arnone died in 2005. John Salvato is a booking agent. Mike Kelly, who sang briefly with The Chaperones in 2006, died of cancer on August 7, 2012.

Tommy Bialoglow had his own group called Twilight Time and currently performs with Joe Zisa & Friends “Jersey Tribute”.

The Original Duprees (Joey Vann Canzano, Mike Kelly, John Salvato, Tom Bialoglow, Joe Santollo, and Mike Arnone) were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2006.

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“Fever – Peggy Lee”

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Peggy Lee (born Norma Deloris Egstrom; May 26, 1920 – January 21, 2002) was an American jazz and popular music singer, songwriter, composer and actress, in a career spanning six decades. From her beginning as a vocalist on local radio to singing with Benny Goodman’s big band, she forged a sophisticated persona, evolving into a multi-faceted artist and performer. She wrote music for films, acted, and created conceptual record albums—encompassing poetry, jazz, chamber pop, and art songs.

Recording Career

In 1942 Lee had her first No. 1 hit, “Somebody Else Is Taking My Place”,[10] followed by 1943’s “Why Don’t You Do Right?” (originally sung by Lil Green), which sold over a million copies and made her famous. She sang with Goodman’s orchestra in two 1943 films, Stage Door Canteen and The Powers Girl.

In March 1943 Lee married Dave Barbour, a guitarist in Goodman’s band.[5] Peggy said, “David joined Benny’s band and there was a ruling that no one should fraternize with the girl singer. But I fell in love with David the first time I heard him play, and so I married him. Benny then fired David, so I quit, too. Benny and I made up, although David didn’t play with him anymore. Benny stuck to his rule. I think that’s not too bad a rule, but you can’t help falling in love with somebody.”

When Lee and Barbour left the band, the idea was that he would work in the studios and she would keep house and raise their daughter, Nicki. But she drifted back to songwriting and occasional recording sessions for the fledgling Capitol Records in 1947, for whom she produced a long string of hits, many of them with lyrics and music by Lee and Barbour, including “I Don’t Know Enough About You” (1946) and “It’s a Good Day” (1947). With the release of the US No. 1-selling record of 1948, “Mañana”, her “retirement” was over. In 1948, Lee’s work was part of Capitol’s library of electrical transcriptions for radio stations. An ad for Capitol Transcriptions in a trade magazine noted that the transcriptions included “special voice introductions by Peggy.”[11]

In 1948 Lee joined Perry Como and Jo Stafford as a rotating host of the NBC Radio musical program The Chesterfield Supper Club.[12][13] She was also a regular on NBC’s Jimmy Durante Show and appeared frequently on Bing Crosby’s radio shows throughout the late 1940s and early 1950s.

She left Capitol for Decca Records in 1952, but returned to Capitol in 1957.[14] She is most famous for her cover version of the Little Willie John hit “Fever” written by Eddie Cooley and John Davenport,[15] to which she added her own, uncopyrighted lyrics (“Romeo loved Juliet,” “Captain Smith and Pocahontas”) and her rendition of Leiber and Stoller’s “Is That All There Is?”. Her relationship with the Capitol label spanned almost three decades, aside from her brief but artistically rich detour (1952–1956) at Decca Records, where in 1953 she recorded one of her most acclaimed albums, Black Coffee. While recording for Decca, Lee had hit singles with the songs “Lover” and “Mister Wonderful”.

In her 60-year-long career, Peggy was the recipient of three Grammy Awards (including the Lifetime Achievement Award), an Academy Award nomination, The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) Award, the President’s Award, the Ella Award for Lifetime Achievement, and the Living Legacy Award[16] from the Women’s International Center. In 1999 Lee was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame.[17]

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