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“The Elegants – Little Star”

“The Elegants – Little Star”

The Elegants is an American doo-wop vocal group, that was started in 1958 by Vito Picone, Arthur Venosa, Frank Tardogno, Carmen Romano and James Mochella in South Beach, Staten Island, New York. Before their nursery rhyme inspired song, “Little Star”,[1] became a number one hit, the band usually performed informally under the boardwalk by their homes. “Little Star” was the only million seller for the group, and was written by Venosa and Picone.[2] It spent 19 weeks in the Billboard Hot 100, earning gold disc status.[2]
The song reached number 25 in the UK Singles Chart in September 1958.[3]

After their success with “Little Star”, the band, still in their teens, toured with artists such as Buddy Holly, Dion and the Belmonts, Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis. However, none of their subsequent singles reached the charts at all making them a prime example of one-hit wonders.

In early 1970s, lead singer Picone returned to the group replacing Tardogno as the lead singer. That group comprising Vito Picone, Freddie Redmond, Nino Amato and Bruce Copp have been together ever since and to this date, have not stopped touring. They can be seen annually performing at the San Gennaro Festival, in Little Italy, Manhattan, New York City.

According to the Elegants website, Freddie Redmond died of emphysema in 2006, and was replaced by original member, James Moschella. As of 2012, the Elegants are still performing at concerts and events throughout the United States, under the name “Vito Picone & The Elegants”. They still perform “Little Star”, as well as their interpretations of many golden oldies. The Elegants band consists of Mike Catalano on bass guitar, Joe Lucenti on lead guitar, Mark Garni on keyboards and Sal Albanese on drums.

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“THE TEEN QUEENS – ”EDDIE MY LOVE” (1956)” 

“THE TEEN QUEENS – ”EDDIE MY LOVE” (1956)” 

Eddie My Love” is a 1956 doo wopsong. According to BMI and ASCAP, the song was written by Maxwell Davis(BMI), Aaron Collins, jr. (ASCAP), and Sam Ling (BMI). Maxwell Davis played sax on the Teen Queens record. Aaron Collins was the brother of the Teen Queens. Sam Ling was an alias of Saul Bihari, co-founder of Modern, RPM, and other labels.

The Teen Queens recorded the song in 1956, and took it to number three on the R&B Best Seller chart and number fourteen on the Billboard Charts.[1] It was to become their biggest selling single, with several follow up records failing to generate the same success.

Other versions of Eddie My Love were also recorded in 1956, by The Chordettes and The Fontane Sisters, these also charted, and by Jo Ann Campbell in 1961. Add to this is the rendition done by Dee Dee Sharp on Cameo Records in 1962.

Reggae versions have been recorded by Nora Dean in 1974 and later by UK-based Jamaican vocal group The Marvels.

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Posted by on January 17, 2018 in doo wop, girl groups, nostalgic

 

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“JOE TURNER Shake, Rattle and Roll 1954” includes BILL HALEY’S AND THE COMETS VERSION

“JOE TURNER Shake, Rattle and Roll 1954”  includes BILL HALEY’S AND THE COMETS VERSION

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Joseph Vernon “Joe” Turner, Jr. (May 18, 1911 – November 24, 1985),[1] best known as Big Joe Turner, was an American blues shouter from Kansas City, Missouri, United States.  According to the songwriter Doc Pomus, “Rock and roll would have never happened without him.”While he had his greatest fame during the 1950s with his rock and roll recordings, particularly “Shake, Rattle and Roll”, Turner’s career as a performer endured from the 1920s into the 1980s.[2] Turner was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, with the Hall lauding him as “the brawny voiced ‘Boss of the Blues'”.

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“The Penguins – Memories Of El Monte”

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“Memories of El Monte”

is a metasong released in 1963 by the Penguins featuring Cleve Duncan. It was written by Frank Zappa and Ray Collins before they were in the Mothers of Invention. The song was first released as Original Sound 27.[2]

Composition

In 1960, Art Laboe released one of the first oldies compilations, Memories of El Monte, a collection of songs by bands that used to play at the dances Laboe organized at El Monte Legion Stadium in El Monte, California.[3]

At some point in the next few years, Ray Collins visited Frank Zappa at his house at 314 W. G Street in Ontario, California (34.070685°N 117.653339°W).[4] Frank told him that he and a friend had thought of writing a song entitled “Memories of El Monte.” Ray had been to the dances at El Monte Legion Stadium and had played there with tenor saxophonist Chuck Higgins. Ray sat down at Frank’s piano, played the “Earth Angel” chord changes and immediately came up with the first lyrics for “Memories of El Monte.”

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Frank Zappa took the song to Art Laboe, who loved it. Laboe came up with the idea of adding a section that named doo-wop groups and having the Penguins impersonate their songs.[3] The song functions as a de facto advertisement for the collection Memories of El Monte when it references songs on the compilation.

“Memories of El Monte” was recorded at Paul Buff’s Pal Recording Studio in Cucamonga, California in 1963.[5] The song was copyrighted on February 20, 1963.[6]

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Ben E. King/The Drifters – Spanish Harlem

Ben E. King/The Drifters – Spanish Harlem

featured image: http://www.allmusic.com/

“Spanish Harlem” is a song released by Ben E. King in 1960 on Atco Records, written by Jerry Leiber and Phil Spector, and produced by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. During a 1968 interview, Leiber credited Stoller with the arrangement;[1] similarly, in a 2009 radio interview with Leiber and Stoller on the Bob Edwards Weekend talk show, Jerry Leiber said that Stoller, while uncredited, had written the key instrumental introduction to the record.[citation needed] In the team’s autobiography from the same year, Hound Dog, Stoller himself remarks that he had created this “fill” while doing a piano accompaniment when the song was presented to Ahmet Ertegun and Jerry Wexler at Atlantic Records, with Spector playing guitar and Leiber doing the vocal. “Since then, I’ve never heard the song played without that musical figure.[1] I presumed my contribution was seminal to the composition, but I also knew that Phil didn’t want to share credit with anyone but Jerry, so I kept quiet.”

It was originally released as the B-side to “First Taste of Love”.[2] The song was King’s first hit away from The Drifters, a group he had led for several years. With an arrangement by Stan Applebaum featuring Spanish guitar, marimba, drum-beats, soprano saxophone, strings, and a male chorus, it climbed the Billboard charts, eventually peaking at #15 R&B and #10 Pop.[3] It was ranked #358 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.[4] King’s version was not a hit in the UK: instead, the original A-side, “First Taste of Love”, that was played on Radio Luxembourg, charting at #27.[5] In 1987, after Stand By Me made #1, the song was re-released and charted at #92.

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 “THE DREAMLOVERS – ”WHEN WE GET MARRIED” (1961)” 

The Dreamlovers were an American doo wop group from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Formed in 1956, the group took several names early in its career, recording demos as The Romancers and The Midnighters (under which name they backed Chubby Checker on a 1958 recording of “The Twist”).[1] They recorded briefly for V-Tone Records before signing to Heritage Records, who released their 1961 single “When We Get Married”. The song reached No. 10 on the US Billboard Hot 100; the next year, their tune “If I Should Lose You” (on End Records) made it to No. 62.[2]

The group remained active well into the 1960s. Their hit “When We Get Married” was covered by The Intruders in 1970 and by Larry Graham in 1980; “You Gave Me Somebody to Love” was a UK hit for Manfred Mann in 1966.

 

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Papa Oom Mow Mow”

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The Rivingtons

were a 1960s doo-wop group. The group members were: lead vocalist Carl White (died January 7, 1980), tenor Al Frazier (died November 13, 2005), baritone Sonny Harris, and bass singer Turner “Rocky” Wilson, Jr.. Frazier was replaced by Madero White for a period in the late 1970s.[1]

History

Previously, the Rivingtons had been known as the Sharps, and they had already had success in the charts with Thurston Harris’s “Little Bitty Pretty One” in 1957, after which they appeared on several Duane Eddy recordings when any extraneous sounds of rebel yells were required, as on Eddy’s 1958 hit “Rebel Rouser”.[1] They also recorded on Warner Brothers Records as The Crenshaws in 1961.[1]

Their first hit as the Rivingtons was ”

Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow

” (Liberty #55427, 1962). Like many such songs, it began with the bass chanting nonsense syllables (in this case the title), followed by the tenor singing over repetitions of it.[citation needed] “Mama-Oom-Mow-Mow”, an even more baroque rewrite of the theme, failed to sell, but they returned to the charts the following year with the similar “The Bird’s the Word”. The B-side of “Mama-Oom-Mow-Mow” was “Waiting” (Liberty #55528[1]).

After their two hit singles, the Rivingtons struggled to find another hit. However, “Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow” and “The Bird’s the Word” were revived, courtesy of a Minnesota-based group calling itself the Trashmen, who made a song up in 1963 from the two songs’ nonsense syllables, calling it “Surfin’ Bird”. The Trashmen recorded the selection over a record shop and passed it off as their own work.[2] It was a medley of the choruses without the verses.[3][4][5] However, the Rivingtons’s management reported it to their lawyers, and the group members were ordered to add the surnames of the Rivingtons to the credits.[6] After the publicity surrounding the allegations in Billboard, the Trashmen had to share the writing credits on not only this recording but also a later one as a sign of good faith. “Surfin’ Bird” itself was revived in the 1970s by the Ramones[7] and the Cramps.[8]

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