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Category Archives: female vocalists

 “Mary Wells – Bye Bye Baby” 

 “Mary Wells – Bye Bye Baby” 

“Bye Bye Baby” is the first single by R&B singerMary Wells, released in December 1960 on the Motown label. The song was one of Motown’s earliest hit singles and showcased a much rougher vocal than the singer had during her later years.

History
In 1960, Wells, then 17 years of age, was a nightclub singer who was struggling to make ends meet in Detroit. She aspired to be a songwriter as well, so she wrote a song for fellow Detroiter and R&B singer Jackie Wilson. She saw Berry Gordy while attempting to deliver “Bye Bye, Baby” to Wilson, and asked Gordy to give Wilson her song. But Gordy, having severed ties with Wilson’s manager to form Motown, asked Wells to sing it herself for Motown. Mary recorded “Bye Bye Baby” in her version of Jackie Wilson’s style. Reports claim that the teen had to record the song 26 times or more, before Gordy had a version he approved for release. According to Detroit music mogul Johnnie Mae Matthews, Wells had come to her with four lines of the song, which Matthews said she finished up. When the song was issued, she didn’t get a songwriting credit.[1]

Release and reaction
Released in December 1960, the song became an R&B hit reaching number eight on the Billboard R&B singles chart and crossed over to pop stations where it peaked at number forty-five.[2] It was significant as the first single released under one of the Motown subsidiaries nationally after the label’s first singles were released through distributing labels such as United Artists.

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Posted by on TueAmerica/New_York2018-06-19T15:04:19+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkTue, 19 Jun 2018 15:04:19 +0000 31, in 1960s, 1970s, female vocalists, nostalgic, vintage music

 

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DEE DEE SHARP set my heart at ease”

DEE DEE SHARP set my heart at ease”

Dee Dee Sharp (born Dione LaRue, September 9, 1945, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States[1]) is an American R&B singer, who began her career recording as a backing vocalist in 1961.

Career

In 1962 she began a string of successful Billboard Hot 100 Top 10 hits: “Slow Twistin'” (with Chubby Checker) (#3) for which she was uncredited on the label, “Mashed Potato Time” (#2), “Gravy (For My Mashed Potatoes)” (#9), “Ride” (#5) and “Do the Bird” (#10).[1] Both “Mashed Potato Time” and “Ride” each sold over one million copies, and were awarded gold discs.[2] “Do the Bird” provided her only entry in the UK Singles Chart, where it peaked at #46 in April 1963.[3] In 1967, she married record producer and Philadelphia International co-founder Kenny Gamble and has since recorded under the name Dee Dee Sharp-Gamble. The couple later divorced in 1980.[1]

She had a brief career resurgence during the disco era and hit the charts again with her version of 10 CC’s “I’m Not In Love.” She also joined Lou Rawls, Billy Paul, Teddy Pendergrass, The O’Jays and Archie Bell as a member of the Philadelphia International All Stars, who had a minor hit with “Let’s Clean Up the Ghetto.” In 1980 she spent four weeks at number one on the Hot Dance Club Play chart with “Breaking and Entering” / “Easy Money,” from her album Dee Dee.

More recent appearances included a performance at Pontins in the UK for the Northern Soul Show, and at the 2008 Detroit Jazz Festival. In May 2009, she appeared in Belgium at the Salle De L’Hotel de Ville.

Sharp and her husband Bill Witherspoon have been residents of Medford, New Jersey.[4]

1962, you could buy a 45 rpm vinyl record for $1.00 or a transistor radio for $15.00. There were many mom and pop record stores, and songs were played over and over again…

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-11T16:27:00+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 11 Jun 2018 16:27:00 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, billboard, female vocalists

 

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“PAUL AND PAULA – Hey Paula Lyrics”

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“Hey Paula” is an American pop standard love song recorded by the singing duo Paul & Paula. It hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on the week ending February 9, 1963, and also made it to number one on the Hot R&B Singles chart.[1] “Paul” was the song’s writer, Ray Hildebrand,[2] a student at Texas’ Howard Payne University, a Baptist institution in the city of Brownwood. “Paula” was Jill Jackson, the niece of the owner of the boarding house where Ray lived.

Writing and recording

Hildebrand wrote the song, originally titled “Paul and Paula”, taking inspiration from the Annette Funicello hit “Tall Paul”.[3] Hildebrand and Jackson performed the song on a local radio station[4] and the song soon became popular enough for the duo to try to make a professional recording. They went to a studio in Fort Worth, Texas, and were fortunate enough to find a producer, Major Bill Smith, with studio time and musicians booked and a missing lead vocalist. He recorded their version of the song and released it on his LeCam Records label, changing the name to “Hey Paula”, credited to Jill and Ray. When the record became a success, it was picked up by the larger Philips Records, which changed the billing to Paul and Paula.[3]

Success

When the song was released on Phillips, it hit the national charts in late 1962, reaching number one on both the pop and R&B charts in 1963. It spawned a follow-up top ten hit, “Young Lovers”, and a series of other hits for the duo.[5]

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-11T10:24:00+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 11 Jun 2018 10:24:00 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, billboard, classic movies, duet, female vocalists, nostalgic

 

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“Nancy Sinatra – These Boots Are Made for Walkin'”

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These Boots Are Made for Walkin‘” is a pop song written by Lee Hazlewood and recorded by Nancy Sinatra. It was released on February 22, 1966, and hit No. 1 in the United States Billboard Hot 100 and in the UK Singles Chart.[2]

Subsequently, many cover versions of the song have been released in a range of styles: metal, pop, rock, punk rock, country, dance, and industrial. Loretta Lynn, Jessica Simpson, Kon Kan, Geri Halliwell, The Residents, Megadeth, Jewel, Operation Ivy, Parquet Courts, and KMFDM also released covers of the song.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-11T10:02:00+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 11 Jun 2018 10:02:00 +0000 31, in 1960s, billboard, classic music, classic television, female vocalists, nostalgic

 

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“I LOVE HOW YOU LOVE ME ~ The Paris Sisters (1961)”

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“I Love How You Love Me” is a song written by Barry Mann and Larry Kolber. It was a 1961 Top Five hit for the pop girl group the Paris Sisters, which inaugurated a string of elaborately produced classic hits by Phil Spector. Bobby Vinton had a Top Ten hit in 1968 with a cover version. The song has been recorded by many other artists over the years.

The Paris Sisters version

Background

The Paris Sisters recorded “I Love How You Love Me” at Gold Star Studios in the autumn of 1961 with Phil Spector as their producer. The group vocalized repeatedly to a piano accompaniment until Spector was satisfied with the balance between the voices, after which a string arrangement which Spector worked on over several days with Hank Levine was added.[1] The song featured a spoken recitation by lead singer Priscilla Paris, speaking the first half of the repeated first verse in an unsung manner over the instrumental break.

According to Lester Sill, with whom Spector was then staying, Spector would bring the tapes for “I Love How You Love Me” from Gold Star Studios every evening to review in his room: “he would wake me up at three or four in the morning, listening to [the song] over and over again at a very low level.” Sill says Spector “must have remixed the strings on that song thirty times; then listened to it for another four or five days before he was sure it was right. Then finally when the record was pressed he listened to the pressing for another two or three days before he gave it an approval.”[1]

Spector’s interest in the song was occasioned by its structural similarity to “To Know Him Is to Love Him”, the No. 1 hit that Spector’s group, the Teddy Bears, had scored in 1958. Annette Kleinbard who had been the Teddy Bears’ vocalist, would weep upon hearing The Paris Sisters’ “I Love How You Love Me” on her car radio: “Before [Priscilla Paris] sung five words I knew it was Phil’s record…it was just the most beautiful record, but I loved it and I hated it at the same time; it felt like Phil had taken my voice and passed it on to someone else”.[1] However Priscilla Paris would opine: “My sound was not like Annette’s – she had a very thin type of little girl voice. I have a heavy roque – that’s a French word meaning very heavy, husky – voice. I think Phil fell into something he wanted to do, added extra ingredients, and ended up with something different.”[2]

“I Love How You Love Me” was originally intended for Tony Orlando, to be arranged in the same upbeat style as Orlando’s precedent hits “Bless You” and “Halfway to Paradise”.1 The song was written by Barry Mann and Larry Kolber (aka Kolberg) who were staff writers at Don Kirshner’s Aldon Music near the Brill Building. Kolber had written the lyrics on a restaurant napkin within five minutes. When Phil Spector discovered the song on a visit to Kirshner’s Aldon offices he persuaded Kirshner that the song would have more potential if rendered by a female act. Spector then recorded “I Love How You Love Me” with The Paris Sisters.

Entering the Top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100 in October 1961, “I Love How You Love Me” reached No. 5 that November.[3]

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Posted by on TueAmerica/New_York2018-06-05T14:30:27+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkTue, 05 Jun 2018 14:30:27 +0000 31, in billboard, classic television, culture, dance, female vocalists, girl groups, nostalgic

 

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“Millie Small My Boy Lollipop 1965”

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Small was born at Gibralter in Clarendon, Jamaica, the daughter of a sugar plantation overseer. Like many Jamaican singers of the era, her career began by winning the Vere Johns Opportunity Hour talent contest at the age of twelve. Wishing to pursue a career as a singer she moved to live with relatives in Love Lane in Kingston.In her teens, she recorded a duet with Owen Gray (“Sugar Plum”) in 1962 and later recorded with Roy Panton for Coxsone Dodd’s Studio One record label as ‘Roy and Millie’. They had a local hit with “We’ll Meet”.

These hits brought her to the attention of Chris Blackwell who became her manager and legal guardian, who in late 1963 took her to Forest Hill, London, where she was given intensive training in dancing and diction. There she made her fourth recording, an Ernest Ranglin rearrangement of “My Boy Lollipop”, a song originally released by Barbie Gaye in late 1956. Released in March 1964, Small’s version was a massive hit, reaching number two both in the UK Singles Chart and in the US Billboard Hot 100, and number three in Canada. It also topped the chart in Australia. Initially it sold over 600,000 copies in the United Kingdom. Including singles sales, album usage and compilation inclusions, the song has since sold more than seven million copies worldwide. Small was not a one-hit wonder. For example, subsequent recordings such as “Sweet William” and “Bloodshot Eyes”, both charted in the UK at numbers 30 and 48 respectively.

“My Boy Lollipop” was doubly significant in British pop history. It was the first major hit for Island Records (although it was actually released on the Fontana label because Chris Blackwell, Island’s owner, did not want to overextend its then-meagre resources; in the US, the record appeared on the Smash Records subsidiary of Mercury Records), and Small was the first artist to have a hit that was recorded in the bluebeat style (she was billed as “The Blue Beat Girl” on the single’s label in the US). This was a music genre that had recently emerged from Jamaica, and was a direct ancestor of reggae.

She appeared on the 1964 Beatles TV special Around The Beatles.

On 6 March 1965, Small appeared on the Australian television programme Bandstand. This was as part of a concert at the Sidney Myer Music Bowl in Kings Domain, Melbourne, part of the Moomba Festival. She performed “My Boy Lollipop”, “What Am I Living For” and “See You Later, Alligator”. Small continued to tour and perform up to the early 1970s.

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Posted by on TueAmerica/New_York2018-06-05T14:22:07+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkTue, 05 Jun 2018 14:22:07 +0000 31, in 1940s, 1960s, female vocalists, nostalgic, vintage music

 

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“You’ll Lose A Good Thing”- Barbara Lynn”

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Barbara Lynn

(born Barbara Lynn Ozen, later Barbara Lynn Cumby, January 16, 1942)[2] is an American rhythm and blues and electric blues guitarist, singer and songwriter.[1] She is best known for her R&B chart-topping hit, “You’ll Lose A Good Thing” (1962).

Life And Career

She was born in Beaumont, Texas, and attended Hebert High School.[3] She played piano as a child, but switched to guitar, which she plays left-handed. Inspired by blues artists Guitar Slim and Jimmy Reed, and pop acts Elvis Presley and Brenda Lee, and winning several local talent shows, she created an all-female band, Bobbie Lynn and Her Idols.[2]

She began performing in local clubs in Texas.[3] Singer Joe Barry saw her and introduced Lynn to producer Huey P. Meaux, who ran SugarHill Recording Studios and several record labels in New Orleans. Her first single, ”

You’ll Lose A Good Thing

“, co-written by her and Meaux, was recorded at Cosimo Matassa’s J&M studio with session musicians including Mac Rebennack (Dr. John).[4] Released by Jamie Records, it was a number 1 US Billboard R&B chart hit and Top 10 Billboard Hot 100 hit in 1962.[2] The song was later recorded by Aretha Franklin and became a country hit record for Freddy Fender. Lynn also released an album, also titled You’ll Lose A Good Thing, which featured ten of her compositions.[2][3]

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-04T11:15:26+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 04 Jun 2018 11:15:26 +0000 31, in 1960s, female vocalists, nostalgic

 

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