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“Maybe – The Chantels (Lyrics)” 

“Maybe – The Chantels (Lyrics)” 

Maybe” is a song with words and music originally credited to End Records owner George Goldner and “Casey”. Writing credit was later transferred to Richard Barrett. Arlene Smith, lead singer of The Chantels, is believed to be an uncredited co-writer.[citation needed]. It was first recorded by the Chantels on October 16, 1957 in a doo-wop style with Barrett playing piano, released in December 1957, and climbing the charts in January 1958. It reached #15 in the pop chart and #2 in the R&B chart. It was subsequently described as “arguably, the first true glimmering of the girl group sound”.[1] Rolling Stone ranked it #199 on its list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.[2]

The song has been covered by many artists, including Janis JoplinThe Three Degrees (whose 1970 version became a top thirty hit) and The Shangri-LasJohn Frusciante of the Red Hot Chili Peppers has performed the song in concert, as seen on the band’s live DVD, Live At Slane Castle. The song is the only recording attributed to Jill Read (which is not a pseudonym for the record’s producer, Dave Edmunds, and whose vocals were not manipulated in the studio to sound like a woman). Jill Read is in fact a girl named Gillian “Tawny” Reed born in Adamsdown, Cardiff. She recorded three 7″ singles in her short career. 

The song made an appearance in the 2010 video game Mafia II, even though the game takes place in 1951 and the song was recorded in 1957.

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Posted by on May 15, 2017 in girl groups, nostalgic

 

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“The Chantels – Look In My Eyes”

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The Chantels were the second African-American girl group to enjoy nationwide success in the United States, preceded by The Bobbettes. The group was established in the early 1950s by students attending St. Anthony of Padua School in The Bronx. The original five members consisted of Arlene Smith (lead), Sonia Goring, Rene Minus, Jackie Landry Jackson and Lois Harris. They derived their name from that of a rival school, St. Frances de Chantal.

Career

In 1957 the Chantels, then in high school, had been singing as a group for several years. Unlike some black groups whose influences were based in gospel, the quintet was influenced by classical music and Latin hymns.[1] Lead singer Arlene Smith had received classical training and performed at Carnegie Hall at age 12.[1] She provided both lyrics and music.[1] The girls were discovered by Richard Barrett, lead singer of The Valentines, and by the summer of 1957 they were signed to End Records, owned by George Goldner.[1] Their first single was “He’s Gone” (Pop #71) in August 1957, written by Arlene Smith.[1] Released in December 1957, their second single, “Maybe,” was a hit (#15 Billboard Hot 100; #2 R & B chart) in January 1958. It sold over a million copies and was awarded a gold disc.[2] The following releases were less successful but End did release an album originally titled We Are the Chantels. The original cover had a photo of the group. That album was soon withdrawn and repackaged with a picture of two white teenagers picking out a song; the title was shortened to The Chantels.[3]

The group was dropped by End in 1959, and Arlene Smith embarked upon a solo career. Harris left to pursue a college education. That year Chantels singles led by Richard Barrett were released on the End subsidiary label, Gone. In 1960 Annette Smith (no relation to Arlene) replaced Arlene Smith. As a quartet the group moved to Carlton Records, where they had their second huge hit with “Look in My Eyes” (#14 pop, #6 R&B). Other releases on Carlton didn’t do as well. One song was “Well I Told You,” a response to the Ray Charles song “Hit the Road, Jack.[1] A Carlton album was released in 1962 titled The Chantels on Tour but featured no live recordings and only seven tracks were recorded by the actual group. The other three tracks were by Gus Backus, Chris Montez and Little Anthony & The Imperials.[4][5] To cash in on “Look in My Eyes”, End threw together an album titled There’s Our Song Again, a compilation of previously recorded material.[3]

The Chantels switched record labels a few more times. Although personnel changed throughout the 1960s, the constants in the group were Jackie Landry, Sonia Goring and Renee Minus. This line-up, plus Arlene Smith, recorded a one-off single for RCA in 1970. Smith fronted a new group called Chantels in the 1970s which featured up-and-coming disco diva Carol Douglas and former Gems vocalist Louise Bethune (who would also become a 1970s performing member of The Crystals). Smith continued to perform solo. In 1995 the remaining original Chantels reformed as well and hired Noemi (Ami) Ortiz as their lead singer. On the PBS special Doo Wop 50, Smith reunited with the surviving original members of The Chantels and dedicated “Maybe” to Jackie Landry, who died in 1997.

The Chantels were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2002. In 2001 they made the final ballot for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame,[6] but without enough votes for induction. Despite continued appearances since then on Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ballots by 1950s doo-wop groups, The Chantels did not get enough votes to reach any subsequent ballot until September 2009, when it was revealed that they were one of 12 nominees to be inducted to the Hall in 2010.

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“Going To The Chapel Of Love- The Dixie Cups” 



The Dixie Cups are an American pop music girl group of the 1960s. They are best known for a string of hits including their 1964 million-selling record “Chapel of Love“, “People Say“, and “Iko Iko“.

CareerEdit

The group hit the top of the charts in 1964 with “Chapel of Love,” a song thatPhil SpectorJeff Barry, and Ellie Greenwich had originally written for The Ronettes.[1] The trio consisted of sisters Barbara Ann and Rosa Lee Hawkins; plus their cousin Joan Marie Johnson, from New Orleans.[2] They first sang together in grade school. Originally, they were to be called Little Miss and the Muffets, but were named the Dixie Cups just prior to their first release.[3]

In 1963, the trio decided to pursue a professional career in music and began singing locally as the Meltones.[4] Within a year Joe Jones, a successful singer in his own right with the Top Five 1960 single “You Talk Too Much,” became their manager.[5] After working with them for five months, Jones took them to New York, where record producers/songwriters Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller signed them to their new Red Bird Records.[1]

The Dixie Cups debut single was the release, “Chapel of Love,” which became their biggest hit reaching number one on the Billboard Hot 100 Chart in June 1964. “Chapel of Love” sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[6] In 1987, the song “Chapel of Love” appeared on the Full Metal Jacketsoundtrack and in the 1991 film, Father of the Bride.[7] The hit single by The Dixie Cups was ranked #279 on Rolling Stones list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.[5] The group also had several other hits including, “People Say” (#12, 1964), “You Should Have Seen the Way He Looked at Me” (#39, 1964), “Little Bell” (#51, 1965), and “Iko Iko” (#20, 1965).[8]

“Iko Iko”, a New Orleans traditional song, was recorded in 1964 but later was released as a single early in 1965.[2]Barbara Hawkins had heard her grandmother sing the song, first recorded in 1953 as “Jock-a-Mo” byJames “Sugar Boy” Crawford. Barbara Hawkins: “We were just clowning around with it during a session using drumsticks on ashtrays. We didn’t realize that Jerry and Mike had the tapes running”. Leiber and Stoller overdubbed a bassline and percussion, and released it. It was The Dixie Cups’ fifth and last hit.

In 1965, the Dixie Cups moved to theABC-Paramount record label before a recording hiatus in 1966 temporarily halted their careers.[4] In 1974 the Hawkins sisters moved from New York to New Orleans, where they both began successful modelling careers.[4] The Hawkins also worked as make-up artists. The Dixie Cups continued to tour as a trio with another New Orleans singer, Beverly Brown, replacing Joan Johnson who became a Jehovah’s Witness and left her music career.[3]Brown who had recorded two solo discs in the early 1960s stayed as the third member until the early 80s when she became ill and was replaced by Dale Mickle. The Dixie Cups continue to perform and make personal appearances. The current line-up consists of the same Hawkins sisters along with Athelgra Neville, sister of the singing Neville Brothers.

On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrinaswept through Louisiana, flooding and flattening most of New Orleans and displacing Barbara and Rosa Hawkins, who subsequently relocated to Florida. Joan Johnson relocated to Texas. Two years later in April 2007, The Louisiana Music Hall Of Fame honored The Dixie Cups for their contributions to Louisiana music by inducting them into TheLouisiana Music Hall of Fame.

Joan Marie Johnson died in New Orleans of congestive heart failure on October 3, 2016 at the age of 72.[9]

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“I LOVE HOW YOU LOVE ME ~ The Paris Sisters (1961)”

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“I Love How You Love Me” is a song written by Barry Mann and Larry Kolber. It was a 1961 Top Five hit for the pop girl group the Paris Sisters, which inaugurated a string of elaborately produced classic hits by Phil Spector. Bobby Vinton had a Top Ten hit in 1968 with a cover version. The song has been recorded by many other artists over the years.

The Paris Sisters version

Background

The Paris Sisters recorded “I Love How You Love Me” at Gold Star Studios in the autumn of 1961 with Phil Spector as their producer. The group vocalized repeatedly to a piano accompaniment until Spector was satisfied with the balance between the voices, after which a string arrangement which Spector worked on over several days with Hank Levine was added.[1] The song featured a spoken recitation by lead singer Priscilla Paris, speaking the first half of the repeated first verse in an unsung manner over the instrumental break.

According to Lester Sill, with whom Spector was then staying, Spector would bring the tapes for “I Love How You Love Me” from Gold Star Studios every evening to review in his room: “he would wake me up at three or four in the morning, listening to [the song] over and over again at a very low level.” Sill says Spector “must have remixed the strings on that song thirty times; then listened to it for another four or five days before he was sure it was right. Then finally when the record was pressed he listened to the pressing for another two or three days before he gave it an approval.”[1]

Spector’s interest in the song was occasioned by its structural similarity to “To Know Him Is to Love Him”, the No. 1 hit that Spector’s group, the Teddy Bears, had scored in 1958. Annette Kleinbard who had been the Teddy Bears’ vocalist, would weep upon hearing The Paris Sisters’ “I Love How You Love Me” on her car radio: “Before [Priscilla Paris] sung five words I knew it was Phil’s record…it was just the most beautiful record, but I loved it and I hated it at the same time; it felt like Phil had taken my voice and passed it on to someone else”.[1] However Priscilla Paris would opine: “My sound was not like Annette’s – she had a very thin type of little girl voice. I have a heavy roque – that’s a French word meaning very heavy, husky – voice. I think Phil fell into something he wanted to do, added extra ingredients, and ended up with something different.”[2]

“I Love How You Love Me” was originally intended for Tony Orlando, to be arranged in the same upbeat style as Orlando’s precedent hits “Bless You” and “Halfway to Paradise”.1 The song was written by Barry Mann and Larry Kolber (aka Kolberg) who were staff writers at Don Kirshner’s Aldon Music near the Brill Building. Kolber had written the lyrics on a restaurant napkin within five minutes. When Phil Spector discovered the song on a visit to Kirshner’s Aldon offices he persuaded Kirshner that the song would have more potential if rendered by a female act. Spector then recorded “I Love How You Love Me” with The Paris Sisters.

Entering the Top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100 in October 1961, “I Love How You Love Me” reached No. 5 that November.[3]

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“Come And Get These Memories” Martha and the Vandellas (1963)

“Come And Get These Memories” Martha and the Vandellas (1963)

“Lover you’ve gone from me and left behind so many memories … Here’s your old friendship ring …I can’t wear it no more…”

LOOKING FOR LOVERS’ LANE? This is the way:

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“Come And Get These. Memories”

 

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The Marvelettes – Beechwood 4-5789

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Marvelettes,

an American all-girl group, achieved popularity in the early to mid-1960s. They consisted of schoolmates Gladys Horton, Katherine Anderson (now Schaffner), Georgeanna Tillman (later Gordon), Juanita Cowart (now Cowart Motley), and Georgia Dobbins, who was replaced by Wanda Young (now Rogers) prior to the group signing their first deal.

The Marvelettes, capitalized on their hit single “Beechwood 4-5789,

their fourth hit, co-written by Marvin Gaye, reached #17.

Following the success of

“Beechwood”,

radio stations also frequently played the single’s flip side, “Someday, Someway”, which paid off sending the song to #8 on the R&B chart—their first double-sided hit.

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THE MARVELETTES “Forever” on YouTube

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The Marvelettes, an all-girl group achieved popularity in the early to mid-1960s.

http://www.last.fm/music/The+Marvelettes

Interesting:

In early 1963, the group was shortened to a quartet when Juanita Cowart opted to leave the band citing a mental breakdown—caused by stress from performing on the road and a mistake she made in describing the group’s background during an appearance on American Bandstand. Carrying on as a quartet, the group issued one of Holland–Dozier–Holland’s early compositions, “Locking Up My Heart”, which peaked at #44. It was one of the first singles to feature Horton and Young in co-leads. The success of “Locking” was probably tested due to strong airplay by the song’s B-side, the Young-led ballad “

Forever

“, which also received a pop charting, peaking at #78.

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