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Category Archives: guy groups

“Big Bopper – Chantilly Lace”

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Jiles Perry “J. P.” Richardson, Jr. (October 24, 1930 – February 3, 1959), commonly known as The Big Bopper, was an American musician, songwriter, and disc jockey, whose big rockabilly look, style, voice, and exuberant personality made him an early rock and roll star. He is best known for his 1958 recording of “Chantilly Lace”.[1]

On February 3, 1959, Richardson died in a plane crash in Clear Lake, Iowa, along with music stars Buddy Holly and Ritchie Valens, and pilot Roger Peterson. That event has become known as “The Day the Music Died” because it is so called in Don McLean’s 1971 song “American Pie”.[2][3]

Biography

J. P. Richardson was born in Sabine Pass, Texas, the oldest son of oil-field worker Jiles Perry Richardson, Sr. and his wife Elise (Stalsby) Richardson. Richardson had two younger brothers, Cecil and James. The family soon moved to Beaumont, Texas. Richardson graduated from Beaumont High School in 1947 and played on the “Royal Purple” football team as a defensive lineman, wearing number 85.[4] Richardson later studied prelaw at Lamar College, and was a member of the band and chorus.

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Posted by on TueAmerica/New_York2018-06-19T13:46:29+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkTue, 19 Jun 2018 13:46:29 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, billboard, classic movies, classic music, guy groups, nostalgic

 

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“THE DOVELLS…”BRISTOL STOMP”……(LYRICS)”

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The Dovells

were an American music group, formed at Overbrook High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1957, under the name ‘The Brooktones’. The members were Arnie Silver, Len Borisoff, Jerry Gross (alias Summers), Mike Freda and Jim Mealey (alias Danny Brooks). Their first single “No, No, No” was a local hit for The Brooktones. Gross left the group in 1959 to form the group The Gems with Mark Stevens, Mike Freda, Warren Purdy, and Roland Scarinci. The remaining Brooktones signed to Parkway Records in 1960 and added Jerry Sirlen and William Shunkwiler to the group, while changing the band’s name to The Dovells. While rehearsing Out In The Cold Again, which turned out to be the B side of Bristol Stomp, Len called Jerry and asked for help with the Harmonies. After 2 days of trying, Len asked Jerry to be part of the group and replace 2 of the guys. Sirlen and Shunkwiler were replaced by Gross and Freda. Mark went on to start his own group Tony & the Raindrops–(Our Love is Over) a local hit, and the later joined The Dovells in the 60s. Warren Purdy went to work for the Boeing Corp., Roland Scarinci enlisted in The Marine Corps then went on to work for AT&T. The Dovells at that point (1961) were – Barry, Gross, Silver, Mealey, & Freda, which went on to record many hit records, starting with the Bristol Stomp. Mealey left the group in ’62 for personal reasons, but still did some recordings with them..

The Dovells first national hit was “

Bristol Stomp

“, a dance song. This was followed by the similar hit “Do the New Continental” (featured in the John Waters movie Hairspray for a minute). “Bristol Stomp” sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[1] They appeared performing both songs in the Chubby Checker movie Don’t Knock The Twist in 1961. They released a series of singles over the next few years. These included “You Can’t Sit Down”, a top hit on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1963. Len left at the end of 1963 for a solo career under the name Len Barry. The high point of his solo career was “1-2-3” in 1965, plus others.

The Dovells released “If You Wanna Be Happy” on the album You Can’t Sit Down in 1963. The song was previously released by Jimmy Soul earlier that year and based on the song “Ugly Woman” by Roaring Lion.

The Dovells continued as a trio, and recorded as The Magistrates for MGM in 1968. As the Magistrates, they recorded the chart hit “Here Comes the Judge,” taking advantage of the popularity of the skit on the TV show Laugh-In. Jerry & Mike wrote and produced the song, added the female voice of Jean Yost(Hillary), and performed as The Magistrates as well as The Dovells. Freda left to do his own thing 1n 1969. The Dovells (Gross-Silver-Stevens) went on to be a big hit, in Las Vegas and the Night Club circuit around the country, doing over 300 shows a year. In 1975, Arnie was tired of being on the road and left the group. Gross and Stevens went on as a duo to great reviews for their music and comedy, and continue to perform to this day. The Dovells have performed 3 times, both for and with President Bill Clinton, a major highlight of their career.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-11T09:16:00+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 11 Jun 2018 09:16:00 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, billboard, classic music, classic television, dance, guy groups, nostalgic

 

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“Hollywood Argyles – Alley Oop”

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“Alley Oop” is a song written and composed by Dallas Frazier. The song, heavily inspired by the V. T. Hamlin-created comic strip of the same name, was first recorded by Frazier as a country tune in 1957.

The Hollywood Argyles

The Hollywood Argyles, a short-lived studio band, recorded the song in 1960, and it reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #3 on the US R&B chart.[1] It also went to #24 on the UK chart. It was produced by Gary Paxton, who also sang lead vocals. At the time, Paxton was under contract to Brent Records, where he recorded as Flip of Skip & Flip.

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Posted by on TueAmerica/New_York2018-06-05T12:13:41+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkTue, 05 Jun 2018 12:13:41 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, comedy, guy groups, humor, nostalgic

 

“Gary U.S. Bonds – New Orleans (stereo)”

“Gary U.S. Bonds – New Orleans (stereo)”

Gary U.S. Bonds (born Gary Levone Anderson, June 6, 1939, in Jacksonville, Florida)[1] is an American rhythm and blues and rock and roll singer, known for his classic hits “New Orleans” and “Quarter to Three”. His career spans several decades and he is also a prolific songwriter.

Career

Born in Jacksonville, Florida, Bonds lived in Norfolk, Virginia, in the 1950s when he began singing publicly in church and with a group called the Turks.[1] He joined record producer Frank Guida’s small Legrand Records label where Guida chose Anderson’s stage name, U.S. Bonds, in hopes that it would be confused with a public service announcement advertising the sale of government bonds and thereby garner more radio airplay.[2] His first three singles and first album, Dance ‘Til Quarter to Three, were released under the U.S. Bonds name, but people assumed it was the name of a group. To avoid confusion, subsequent releases, including his second album Twist Up Calypso, were made under the name Gary (U.S.) Bonds. The parentheses were discarded in the 1970s.[3][4]

Bonds’ first hit was the song “New Orleans” (US No.6)[citation needed], which was followed by “Not Me”, a flop for Bonds but later a hit for the Orlons, and then by his only number one hit, “Quarter to Three” in June 1961. “Quarter To Three” sold one million records, earning a gold disc.[1] Subsequent hits, under his modified name, included “School Is Out” (#5), “Dear Lady Twist” (#9), “School Is In” (#28) and “Twist, Twist, Señora” (#10) in the early 1960s. In a 1963 tour of Europe, he headlined above the Beatles. His hits featured solos by the saxophonist Gene Barge.[3]

“Quarter to Three” appears on The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll list.[5]

In the early 1980s, Bonds had a career resurgence with two albums Dedication and On the Line, collaborations with Bruce Springsteen, Steven Van Zandt, and the E Street Band, and had hits including “This Little Girl” (his comeback hit in 1981, which reached #11 on the pop chart in Billboard and #5 on the mainstream rock chart), “Jolé Blon” and “Out of Work”.[3] Bonds continues to release albums sporadically, and today is a mainstay of the nostalgia concert circuit.[citation needed]

While Bonds is mostly known for achievements within rhythm and blues and rock and roll, he often transcends these genres, e.g., his song “She’s All I Got”, co-written by Jerry Williams, Jr. (better known as Swamp Dogg), was nominated for the Country Music Association’s “Song of the Year” in 1972 when it was a big hit for Johnny Paycheck (Freddie North also charted his only pop hit with a soul cover of the same song). He is also a 1997 honoree of the Rhythm & Blues Foundation. Bonds is an accomplished golfer and often plays celebrity PGA Tour events.[3] Bonds guested in Blues Brothers 2000 in 1998 as part of a rival blues supergroup the Louisiana Gator Boys.

Bonds released an album in 2004 called Back in 20, the title referencing his repeated sporadic pop-ups of popularity (his first hits were in the 1960s, then again in the 1980s, and now another significant album in the early 2000s, each 20-odd years apart). The album features guest appearances by Springsteen and Southside Johnny.[3] Bonds was also inducted into the Long Island Music Hall of Fame on October 15, 2006.

In 2009 he released a new album Let Them Talk and toured the UK as a special guest of Bill Wyman’s Rhythm Kings.[6] Most recently, in 2010, Bonds contributed duet vocals on the song “Umbrella in My Drink” on Southside Johnny’s album Pills and Ammo.[7] He also made a guest appearance in the 3rd series of Lillyhammer which stars and is produced by Steven van Zandt.

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-04T13:00:24+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 04 Jun 2018 13:00:24 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, guy groups, nostalgic, vintage music

 

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“Shep & the Limelites – Daddy’s Home”

“Shep & the Limelites – Daddy’s Home”

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Shep and the Limelites was an American doo-wop group of the early 1960s,[1] composed of James “Shep” Sheppard (September 24, 1935 – January 24, 1970), Clarence Bassett (March 13, 1936 – January 25, 2005) and Charles Baskerville (July 6, 1936 – January 18, 1995). They are best known for their 1961 hit recording, “Daddy’s Home”, co-written by Sheppard.

Career

Sheppard and Bassett, both from Queens County, New York, and Baskerville, originally from Virginia, organized a group in Queens in 1960. This was billed initially as Shane Sheppard And The Limelites, but quickly became Shep and the Limelites. All three had previous experience in other groups: Shep with The Heartbeats (notable for “A Thousand Miles Away”); Bassett with The Five Sharps and then, with Baskerville, in The Videos.[1]

Shep & The Limelites’ recording sessions for Hull Records started in August 1960. They recorded the original version of “Daddy’s Home” on February 1, 1961. “Daddy’s Home” reached no. 2 on the Billboard popular music chart in May,[1] and was covered by P J Proby (1970) Jermaine Jackson (1972), Toots and the Maytals (Funky Kingston 1973), Junior English, and Cliff Richard (1981). Later songs were not as successful as “Daddy’s Home”, but still sold well; among these were “What Did Daddy Do”, “Ready For Your Love” and “Our Anniversary”.[2]

Kahl Music, publisher of “A Thousand Miles Away”, an earlier song written by Sheppard, sued Keel Music, publisher of “Daddy’s Home”, for copyright violation. Keel eventually lost, and this resulted in the end of the Limelites and Hull Records in 1966. Bassett joined The Flamingos and Baskerville joined The Players and then The Drifters.[1] Sheppard re-formed the Limelites in the late 1960s, but was murdered on January 24, 1970.[1] He died in his car on the Long Island Expressway as a result of injuries sustained in a robbery.[2][3] Baskerville died, at age 58 on January 18, 1995 in New York.[4] Bassett died on January 25, 2005, at age 68 from the complications of emphysema, at his home in Richmond, Virginia.[5]

James Sheppard’s legacy includes the composing of rock ‘n’ roll’s first song cycle. Writing songs for both the Heartbeats and Shep and the Limelites, he tells the story of going home to his girl, with twists along the way, getting married, and celebrating their anniversary. The songs that told this story were “A Thousand Miles Away”, “500 Miles to Go”, both with the Heartbeats; and then “Daddy’s Home”, “Three Steps from the Altar,” “Our Anniversary”, and “What Did Daddy Do?” for Shep and the Limelites.[6]

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-04T09:52:00+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 04 Jun 2018 09:52:00 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, billboard, guy groups, nostalgic

 

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“Tommy Boyce on the Lloyd Thaxton Show – 1964”

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Lloyd Thaxton

was a local “freelance” announcer in Los Angeles in the late 1950s when, through a deal with a television station manager, got his own weekday television show on KCOP, Lloyd Thaxton’s Record Shop. Record Shop would eventually lead to

The Lloyd Thaxton Show

a live music entertainment show from Los Angeles in the vein of Dick Clark’s American Bandstand. Thaxton’s show was a wacky hour of dancing high school teenagers, skits, and comedy by Thaxton, and musical features by the top pop, rock, folk and country artists of the day. Originally called Lloyd Thaxton’s Hop,

The Lloyd Thaxton Show

which launched on KCOP-TV in late 1961, would go into national syndication in 1964 and become the highest rated musical entertainment program in the U.S. for the next 3 years. In 1967, after more than 2000 episodes, Thaxton retired the show and ventured into other programs and parts of the industry, eventually ending up winning five Emmy Awards with 15 more Emmy nominations. Only about 40 hours of the original 2000+ shows still exist and have been edited into a “Best Of” DVD set, which has been held up because of legalities. Thaxton passed away in 2008 at the age of 81 after a short fight against multiple melanoma.

http://www.tv.com/shows/the-lloyd-thaxton-show/

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-05-21T12:38:00+00:00America/New_York05bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 21 May 2018 12:38:00 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, billboard, dance, female vocalists, girl groups, guy groups, nostalgic, vintage music, vintage tv shows

 

The Walker Brothers “Make It Easy On Yourself”

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The Walker Brothers

was an American pop group of the 1960s and 1970s, that included Scott Engel (eventually known professionally as Scott Walker), John Walker (born John Maus, but using the name Walker since his teens), and Gary Leeds (eventually known as Gary Walker). After moving to Britain in 1965, they had a number of top ten albums and singles there, including the No. 1 chart hits “Make It Easy on Yourself” and “The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine (Anymore),” both of which also made the US top 20. In between the two was the lesser US hit “My Ship is Coming In”.

Formed in 1964, they adopted the ‘Walker Brothers’ name as a show business touch even though the members were all unrelated — “simply because we liked it.”[1] They provided a unique counterpoint to the British Invasion by achieving much more success in the United Kingdom than in their home country, a period when the popularity of British bands such as The Beatles dominated the U.S. charts. [2]

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-05-21T10:24:00+00:00America/New_York05bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 21 May 2018 10:24:00 +0000 31, in classic music, classic television, guy groups, nostalgic

 

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