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Category Archives: nostalgic

“Love Letters (Straight from Your Heart)”

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Ketty Lester (born Revoyda Frierson, August 16, 1934) is an American singer and actress, who is known for her 1962 hit single, “Love Letters”, which reached the Top 5 of the charts in both the United States and the United Kingdom, and her role in the American television series, Little House on the Prairie.

Life and career

The daughter of a farmer, she was born in Hope, Arkansas, one of 15 children, and first sang in her church and school choirs. She won a scholarship to study music at San Francisco State College, and in the early 1950s began performing under the name Ketty Lester in the city’s Purple Onion club. She later toured Europe as a singer with Cab Calloway’s orchestra.[citation needed]

Ketty Lester (as Revoyda Frierson) appeared as a contestant on the December 26, 1957 episode of You Bet Your Life, hosted by Groucho Marx. Lester sang “You Do Something to Me”. The chosen category was “Mother Goose”, a subject she admitted knowing nothing about; George Fenneman fed the correct answers to her and she and her partner won $1,000.[1]

Returning to California, she recorded her first single, “Queen For A Day”, for the Everest label.[2] She was introduced by Dorothy Shay to record producers and songwriters Ed Cobb and Lincoln Mayorga, of The Four Preps and The Piltdown Men, who won her a contract with Era Records in Los Angeles. In 1961 they released her single, “I’m a Fool to Want You” b/w “Love Letters”.[3]

Radio listeners and disc jockeys preferred the B-side, a reworking of a 1945 hit by Dick Haymes, and Lester’s recording of “Love Letters”, which featured Lincoln Mayorga’s sparse piano arrangement and Earl Palmer on drums,[2] rose to # 5 in the Billboard Hot 100 early in 1962.[4][3]

The record also reached # 2 on the R&B chart, and # 4 in the UK Singles Chart, selling over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA.[5] In 1991, it was ranked 176th in the RIAA-compiled list of Songs of the Century.[3]

In 1962 she toured the UK as support act on the Everly Brothers tour. The follow-up, a version of George and Ira Gershwin’s “But Not for Me” from the musical Girl Crazy, reached # 41 in the US pop charts and # 45 in the UK. She released an album, Love Letters, which contained the tracks “You Can’t Lie to a Liar” and a cover of Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land” – both of which were issued as singles which scraped into the bottom of the Hot 100 – and was nominated for a Grammy in the Best Female Pop Vocal Performance category.[3]

Lester continued to record for Era with little success until 1964, when she signed for RCA. She released several unsuccessful singles for that label, and two albums, The Soul of Me and Where Is Love?, in a more R&B-oriented style that has been compared to Dinah Washington and Nancy Wilson. Some of her earlier recordings also featured on one side of an album shared with previously released tracks by Betty Everett. Also in 1964, she won a Theatre World Award for her performance in the off-Broadway show Cabin in the Sky.[6] She moved to the Tower label, issuing a single and album, When A Woman Loves A Man, an answer record to Percy Sledge’s “When a Man Loves a Woman”. However, these releases, and later records for the Pete label including a 1968 album, Ketty Lester, met with little commercial success.[2][3]

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Posted by on June 19, 2017 in nostalgic

 

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“CASABLANCA – starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman”

Hal B. Wallis
Screenplay by
Julius J. Epstein
Philip G. Epstein
Howard Koch
Based on Everybody Comes to Rick’s 
by Murray Burnett
Joan Alison
Starring
Humphrey Bogart
Ingrid Bergman
Paul Henreid[1]
Music by Max Steiner
Cinematography Arthur Edeson
Edited by Owen Marks
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release dates
November 26, 1942 (Hollywood Theatre)
January 23, 1943 (United States)
Running time
102 minutes[2]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $878,000[3]
Box office $3.7 million (initial US release)[4]

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Casablanca is a 1942 American romantic drama film directed by Michael Curtiz and based on Murray Burnett and Joan Alison’s unproduced stage play Everybody Comes to Rick’s. The film stars Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, and Paul Henreid; it also features Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, and Dooley Wilson. Set during World War II, it focuses on an American expatriate who must choose between his love for a woman and helping her Czech Resistance leader husband escape the Vichy-controlled city of Casablanca to continue his fight against the Nazis.

Story editor Irene Diamond convinced producer Hal B. Wallis to purchase the film rights to the play in January 1942. Brothers Julius and Philip G. Epstein were initially assigned to write the script. However, despite studio resistance, they left to work on Frank Capra’s Why We Fight series early in 1942. Howard E. Koch was assigned to the screenplay until the Epsteins returned a month later. Casey Robinson assisted with three weeks of rewrites, but his work would later go uncredited. Wallis chose Curtiz to direct the film after his first choice, William Wyler, became unavailable. Principal photography began on May 25, 1942, ending on August 3; the film was shot entirely at Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank, with the exception of one sequence at Van Nuys Airport in Van Nuys, Los Angeles.

Although Casablanca was an A-list film with established stars and first-rate writers, no one involved with its production expected it to be anything out of the ordinary.[5] It was just one of hundreds of pictures produced by Hollywood every year. Casablanca was rushed into release to take advantage of the publicity from the Allied invasion of North Africa a few weeks earlier.[6] It had its world premiere on November 26, 1942, in New York City and was released nationally in the United States on January 23, 1943. The film was a solid if unspectacular success in its initial run.

Casablanca did account for three Academy Awards – Best Picture, Director (Curtiz) and Adapted Screenplay (the Epsteins and Koch) – and gradually its reputation grew. Its lead characters,[7][8] memorable lines,[9][10][11] and pervasive theme song[12] have all become iconic and the film consistently ranks near the top of lists of the greatest films in history.

Plot

In December 1941, American expatriate Rick Blaine is the proprietor of an upscale nightclub and gambling den in Casablanca. “Rick’s Café Américain” attracts a varied clientele: Vichy French and German officials; refugees desperate to reach the still-neutral United States; and those who prey on them. Although Rick professes to be neutral in all matters, it is later revealed he ran guns to Ethiopia during its war with Italy and fought on the Loyalist side in the Spanish Civil War.

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Petty crook Ugarte shows up and boasts to Rick of “letters of transit” obtained by murdering two German couriers. The papers allow the bearers to travel freely around German-controlled Europe and to neutral Portugal, and are thus almost priceless to the refugees stranded in Casablanca. Ugarte plans to sell them at the club that night, and asks Rick to hold them. Before he can meet his contact, he is intercepted by the local police under the command of Captain Louis Renault, an unabashedly corrupt Vichy official. Ugarte dies in custody without revealing that he entrusted the letters to Rick.

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At this point, the reason for Rick’s bitterness—former lover Ilsa Lund—walks into his establishment. Upon spotting Rick’s friend and house pianist, Sam, Ilsa asks him to play “As Time Goes By.” Rick storms over, furious that Sam has disobeyed his order never to perform that song, and is stunned to see Ilsa. She is accompanied by her husband, Victor Laszlo, a renowned fugitive Czech Resistance leader. They need the letters to escape to America to continue his work. German Major Strasser has come to Casablanca to see that Laszlo does not succeed.

When Laszlo makes inquiries, Ferrari, a major underworld figure and Rick’s friendly business rival, divulges his suspicion that Rick has the letters. In private, Rick refuses to sell at any price, telling Laszlo to ask his wife the reason. They are interrupted when Strasser leads a group of officers in singing “Die Wacht am Rhein.” Laszlo orders the house band to play “La Marseillaise.” When the band looks to Rick, he nods his head. Laszlo starts singing, alone at first, then patriotic fervor grips the crowd and everyone joins in, drowning out the Germans. In retaliation, Strasser has Renault close the club.

Bogart and Bergman
That night, Ilsa confronts Rick in the deserted café. When he refuses to give her the letters, she threatens him with a gun, but then confesses that she still loves him. She explains that when they met and fell in love in Paris in 1940, she believed her husband had been killed attempting to escape from a concentration camp. Later, while preparing to flee with Rick from the imminent fall of the city to the German army, she learned that Laszlo was alive and in hiding. She left Rick without explanation to nurse her sick husband.

Rick’s bitterness dissolves. He agrees to help, letting her believe that she will stay with him when Laszlo leaves. When Laszlo unexpectedly shows up, having narrowly escaped a police raid on a Resistance meeting, Rick has waiter Carl spirit Ilsa away. Laszlo, aware of Rick’s love for Ilsa, tries to persuade him to use the letters to take her to safety. When the police arrest Laszlo on a minor, trumped-up charge, Rick persuades Renault to release him by promising to set him up for a much more serious crime: possession of the letters. To allay Renault’s suspicions, Rick explains that he and Ilsa will be leaving for America. When Renault tries to arrest Laszlo as arranged, Rick forces him at gunpoint to assist in their escape. At the last moment, Rick makes Ilsa board the plane to Lisbon with her husband, telling her that she would regret it if she stayed—”Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but soon and for the rest of your life.”

Strasser, tipped off by Renault, drives up alone. Rick kills him when he tries to intervene. When policemen arrive, Renault pauses, then orders them to “round up the usual suspects.” Renault suggests to Rick that they join the Free French in Brazzaville. As they walk away into the fog, Rick says, “Louis, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.”

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Sue Thompson Sings – “Norman”

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Sue Thompson

(born Eva Sue McKee; July 19, 1925) is an American pop and country music singer. She is best known for the million selling hits “Sad Movies (Make Me Cry)” and “Norman”, both pop hits in the 1960s.

Early life

Recording career

Within only a year, she had divorced Martin to marry Hank Penny, a comedian and singer. Penny and Thompson hosted a TV show in Los Angeles together before eventually moving to Las Vegas. Thompson recorded separately and also with her husband for Decca Records. However, none of their songs ever gained any real success. In 1960, Thompson signed on with Hickory Records. In 1961, “Sad Movies (Make Me Cry)” became a No. 5 hit on the pop charts, and she followed this up successfully with ”

Norman

,” which reached No. 3. Both of these hit singles were written by songwriter John D. Loudermilk. They both sold over one million copies, and were awarded with gold discs.[2]

In 1962, “Have a Good Time” was a Top 40 hit and in 1963, “Willie Can” was a minor hit. Her early 1960s’ hits made Thompson, then in her mid-thirties, a favorite among the teenage crowd and briefly a rival to the much younger Connie Francis and Brenda Lee. Two additional hits, also written by Loudermilk, were “James (Hold the Ladder Steady)” and “Paper Tiger.”

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Posted by on June 19, 2017 in 1960s, female vocalists, nostalgic

 

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“Sunset Boulevard (1950) trailer”

“Sunset Boulevard (1950) trailer”

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Sunset Boulevard (stylized onscreen as SUNSET BLVD.) is a 1950 American black comedy/drama film noir[3] directed and co-written by Billy Wilder, and produced and co-written by Charles Brackett. It was named after the boulevard that runs through Los Angeles and Beverly Hills, California.

The film stars William Holden as Joe Gillis, an unsuccessful screenwriter, and Gloria Swanson as Norma Desmond, a faded silent movie star who draws him into her fantasy world where she dreams of making a triumphant return to the screen, with Erich von Stroheim as Max Von Mayerling, her devoted servant. Nancy Olson, Fred Clark, Lloyd Gough and Jack Webb play supporting roles. Director Cecil B. DeMille and gossip columnist Hedda Hopper play themselves, and the film includes cameo appearances by leading silent film actors Buster Keaton, H. B. Warner and Anna Q. Nilsson.

Praised by many critics when first released, Sunset Boulevard was nominated for eleven Academy Awards (including nominations in all four acting categories) and won three. It is widely accepted as a classic, often cited as one of the greatest films of American cinema. Deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” by the U.S. Library of Congress in 1989, Sunset Boulevard was included in the first group of films selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. In 1998, it was ranked number twelve on the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 best American films of the 20th century, and in 2007 it was 16th on their 10th Anniversary list.

Plot
At a Sunset Boulevard mansion, the body of Joe Gillis floats in the swimming pool. In a flashback, Joe relates the events leading to his death.

Six months earlier, down-on-his-luck screenwriter Joe tries selling Paramount Pictures producer Sheldrake on a story he submitted. Script reader Betty Schaefer harshly critiques it in Joe’s presence, unaware that he is the author. Later, while fleeing from repossession men seeking his car, Joe turns into the driveway of a seemingly deserted mansion. After concealing the car, he hears a woman calling him, apparently mistaking him for someone else. Ushered in by Max, her butler, Joe recognizes the woman as long-forgotten silent film star Norma Desmond. Learning he is a writer, she asks his opinion of a script she has written for a film about Salome. She plans to play the role herself in a comeback. Joe finds her script abysmal, but flatters her into hiring him as a script doctor.

Moved into Norma’s mansion at her insistence, Joe resents but gradually accepts his dependent situation. He sees that Norma refuses to face the fact that her fame has evaporated and learns the fan letters she still receives are secretly written by Max, who tells him Norma is subject to depression and has made suicide attempts.

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Norma lavishes attention on Joe and buys him expensive clothes. At her New Year’s Eve party, he discovers he is the only guest and realizes she has fallen in love with him. He tries to let her down gently, but she slaps him and retreats to her room.

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Joe visits his friend Artie Green to ask about staying at his place. At Artie’s party, he again meets Betty, who he learns is Artie’s girl. Betty thinks a scene in one of Joe’s scripts has potential, but Joe is uninterested. When Joe phones Max to have him pack his things, Max tells him Norma cut her wrists with his razor. Joe returns to Norma.

Norma has Max deliver the edited Salome script to her former director, Cecil B. DeMille, at Paramount. She starts getting calls from Paramount executive Gordon Cole, but petulantly refuses to speak to anyone except DeMille. Eventually, she has Max drive her and Joe to Paramount in her 1929 Isotta Fraschini.[4] The older studio employees warmly greet her. DeMille receives her affectionately and treats her with great respect, tactfully evading her questions about Salome. Meanwhile, Max learns that Cole merely wants to rent her unusual car for a film.

Preparing for her imagined comeback, Norma undergoes rigorous beauty treatments. Joe secretly works nights at Betty’s Paramount office, collaborating on an original screenplay. His moonlighting is found out by Max, who reveals that he was once a respected film director. He discovered Norma as a teenage girl, made her a star and was her first husband. After she divorced him, he found life without her unbearable and abandoned his career to become her servant.

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Although Betty is engaged to Artie, she and Joe fall in love. Norma discovers a manuscript with Joe’s and Betty’s names on it. She phones Betty and insinuates what sort of man Joe really is. Joe, overhearing, invites Betty to come see for herself. When she arrives, he pretends he is satisfied being a kept man, but after she tearfully leaves, he packs to return to his old Ohio newspaper job. He disregards Norma’s threat to kill herself and the gun she shows him to back it up. He bluntly tells her the public has forgotten her, there will be no comeback, and the fan letters are from Max. As Joe walks away, Norma shoots him three times. He falls into the pool.

The flashback ends. The house is filled with police and reporters. Norma, having lost touch with reality, believes the newsreel cameras are there to film Salome. Max and the police play along. Max sets up a scene for her and calls “Action!” As the cameras roll, Norma dramatically descends her grand staircase. She pauses and makes an impromptu speech about how happy she is to be making a film again, ending with: “All right, Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my close-up.”[5]

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Cast
William Holden as Joseph C. “Joe” Gillis
Gloria Swanson as Norma Desmond
Erich von Stroheim as Maximillian “Max” von Mayerling
Nancy Olson as Betty Schaefer
Fred Clark as Sheldrake, Paramount Producer
Lloyd Gough as Morino, Joe’s agent
Jack Webb as Arthur “Artie” Green
Franklyn Farnum as Undertaker
Larry J. Blake as Finance man #1
Charles Dayton as Finance man #2
As Themselves:

Cecil B. DeMille
Hedda Hopper
Buster Keaton (Bridge player)
Anna Q. Nilsson (Bridge player)
H. B. Warner (Bridge Player)
Ray Evans (Pianist at Artie’s party)
Jay Livingston (Pianist at Artie’s party)
Henry Wilcoxon as Actor (uncredited)

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“Edd Byrnes & Connie Stevens – Kookie, Kookie (Lend Me Your Comb) – 1959”

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Edd Byrnes (born July 30, 1933) is an American actor best known for his starring role in the television series 77 Sunset Strip. He also was featured in the 1978 film Grease as television teen-dance show host Vince Fontaine, and was a charting recording artist with “Kookie, Kookie — Lend Me Your Comb” (with Connie Stevens).

Early life
He was born Edward Byrne Breitenberger. He had two siblings, Vincent and Jo-Ann. When he was 13, his father died. He then dropped his last name in favor of “Byrnes” based on the name of his maternal grandfather, a fireman.[1]

Screen career
His enduring and most famous role was as Gerald Lloyd “Kookie” Kookson III, on the ABC/Warner Brothers detective series 77 Sunset Strip. He played a continually hair-combing serial killer in the pilot, Girl on the Run, but he was so popular (a national teen sensation) that the producers brought him back the following week as a regular cast member in the role of a chrome-plated hotrod-driving, hipster-talking (“Kookie-talk”) parking valet and sometime protégé private investigator. Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., explained the situation to the audience:

We previewed this show, and because Edd Byrnes was such a hit we decided that Kookie and his comb had to be in our series. So this week, we’ll just forget that in the pilot he went off to prison to be executed.

— From the pre-credit sequence for the episode “Lovely Lady, Pity Me”

Kookie’s recurring character—a different, exciting look to which teens of the day related —- the valet parking attendant who constantly combed his piled-high, greasy-styled teen hair, often in a windbreaker jacket, who worked part-time at the so-called Dean Martin’s Dino’s Lodge restaurant, next door to private investigator agency at 77 Sunset Strip in West Hollywood. Kookie frequently acted as an unlicensed, protégé detective who helped the private eyes (Zimbalist and Roger Smith) on their cases based upon “the word” heard from Kookie’s street informants. Kookie called everybody “Dad” (as in “Sure thing . . . Dad.”), and was television’s homage to the “Jack Kerouac” style of cult-hipster of the late 1950s.

To the thrill of teen viewers, Kookie spoke a jive-talk “code” to everyone, whether you understood him or not, and Kookie knew better than others “the word on the street.” Some say the Kookie character borrowed much from James Dean’s character in the film “Rebel Without a Cause”, and was the progenitor to Henry Winkler’s The Fonz character of the Happy Days series (switch hot rod for motorcycle; same hair, comb and a leather jacket).

Kookie’s constant onscreen tending of his ducktail haircut led to many jokes among comedians of the time, and resulted in the 1959 charted ‘rap’ style recording (13 weeks), “Kookie, Kookie–Lend Me Your Comb”, recorded with actress and recording artist Connie Stevens, and which reached #4 on the Billboard Hot 100. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA.[2] The song also appeared on the Edd Byrnes album, entitled (what else) Kookie. He and Stevens appeared together on ABC’s The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom. During the run of 77 Sunset Strip, Byrnes, as the “Kookie” character, was a popular celebrity (Elvis Presley-level national attention), and Byrnes received fan mail volume that reached 15,000 letters a week, according to Picture Magazine in 1961, and rivaled most early rock recording stars in the day.[citation needed]

Byrnes walked off the show in the second season demanding a bigger part and bigger pay; the producers eventually agreed.[3] He appeared as a guest star in other WB series, including Lawman and Sugarfoot, in the latter with John Russell, Rodolfo Hoyos, Jr., and Will Wright in the 1958 season-premiere episode “Ring of Sand”.

Owing to restrictions in his Warner Brothers television contract, Byrnes was forced to turn down film roles in Ocean’s Eleven (1960), Rio Bravo (1959), North to Alaska (1960) and The Longest Day (1962). However he appeared in the Warner Brothers films Darby’s Rangers (1957; replacing Tab Hunter), Marjorie Morningstar (1958), Up Periscope and Yellowstone Kelly (both in 1959). He tested for the role of John F. Kennedy in PT 109 but President Kennedy preferred Cliff Robertson.[citation needed]

Though a popular celebrity the years of unfortunate “Kookie” typecasting led Brynes to ultimately buy out his television contract with Warner Brothers to clear his way for films—though it was accomplished too late to allow Byrnes to capitalize on feature-length cinema projects based upon his established television series fame.

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“Nutty Professor 1963, Original version- Best scenes (part 1)”

​The Nutty Professor is a 1963 American science fiction-romantic comedy film produced, directed, co-written (with Bill Richmond) and starring Jerry Lewis. The score was composed by Walter Scharf. The film is a parody of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

In 2004, The Nutty Professor was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

In 1996, a remake starring Eddie Murphy and Jada Pinkett-Smith was released, directed by Tom Shadyac.

Plot
Professor Julius Kelp is a nerdy, scruffy, buck-toothed, accident-prone, socially awkward university professor whose experiments in the classroom laboratory are unsuccessful and highly destructive. When a football-playing bully embarrasses and attacks him, Kelp decides to “beef up” by joining a local gym. Kelp’s lack of physical strength prompts him to invent a serum that turns him into the handsome, suave, charming and cheeky girl-chasing hipster, Buddy Love.

This new personality gives him the self-confidence to pursue one of his students, Stella Purdy. Although she resents Love, she finds herself strangely attracted to him. Buddy wows the crowd with his jazzy, breezy musical delivery and poised demeanor at the Purple Pit, a nightclub where the students hang out. He also mocks a bartender and waitress and punches a student. The formula wears off at inopportune times, often to Kelp’s humiliation.

Although Kelp knows that his alternate persona is a bad person, he cannot prevent himself from continually taking the formula as he enjoys the attention that Love receives. As Buddy performs at the annual student dance the formula starts to wear off. His real identity now revealed, Kelp gives an impassioned speech, admitting his mistakes and seeking forgiveness. Kelp says that the one thing he learned from being someone else is that if you don’t like yourself, you can’t expect others to like you. Purdy meets Kelp backstage, and confesses that she prefers Kelp over Buddy Love.

Eventually, Kelp’s formerly timid father chooses to market the formula (a copy of which Kelp had sent to his parents’ home for safekeeping), endorsed by the deadpan president of the university who proclaims, “It’s a gasser!” Kelp’s father makes a pitch to the chemistry class, and the students all rush forward to buy the new tonic. In the confusion Kelp and Purdy slip out of the class. Armed with a marriage license and two bottles of the formula, they elope.

During the short closing credits, each of the characters come out and bow down to the camera, and when Jerry Lewis, still portraying Kelp, comes out and bows, he trips and goes into the camera, breaking it and causing the picture to go black.

Cast
Jerry Lewis as Professor Julius F. Kelp/Buddy Love/Baby Kelp

Stella Stevens as Ms. Stella Purdy
Del Moore as Dr. Mortimer S. Warfield
Kathleen Freeman as Ms. Millie Lemmon
Howard Morris as Mr. Elmer Kelp
Elvia Allman as Mrs. Edwina Kelp
Julie Parrish as College Student
Milton Frome as Dr. M. Sheppard Leevee
Buddy Lester as Bartender
Med Flory as Warzewski, the football player

 
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Posted by on June 12, 2017 in nostalgic

 

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MOVE OVER DARLING STARRING DORIS DAY AND JAMES GARNER

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Move Over, Darling is a 1963 comedy film starring Doris Day, James Garner, and Polly Bergen and directed by Michael Gordon. The picture was a remake of a 1940 screwball comedy film, My Favorite Wife, with Irene Dunne, Cary Grant and Gail Patrick. In between these movies, an unfinished version entitled Something’s Got to Give began shooting in 1962, directed by George Cukor and starring Marilyn Monroe (who was fired and died soon after) and Dean Martin.

The film was chosen as the 1964 Royal Film Performance and had its UK premiere on 24 February 1964 at the Odeon Leicester Square in the presence of H.R.H. Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

Plot
Ellen Wagstaff Arden (Doris Day), a mother of two young girls named Jenny and Didi, was believed to be lost at sea following an airplane accident. Her husband, Nick Arden (James Garner), was one of the survivors.

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After five years of searching for her, he decides to move on with his life by having her declared legally dead so he can marry Bianca (Polly Bergen), all on the same day. However, Ellen is alive; she is rescued and returns home that particular day. At first crestfallen, she is relieved to discover from her mother-in-law Grace (Thelma Ritter) that her (ex-) husband’s honeymoon has not started yet.

When Nick is confronted by Ellen, he eventually clears things up with Bianca, but he then learns that the entire time Ellen was stranded on the island she was there with another man, the handsome, athletic Stephen Burkett (Chuck Connors) – and that they called each other “Adam” and “Eve.”

Nick’s mother has him arrested for bigamy and all parties appear before the same judge that married Nick and Bianca earlier that day. Bianca and Ellen request divorces before the judge sends them all away. Bianca leaves Nick, while Ellen storms out, still married to Nick, declared alive again. Ellen returns to Nick’s house unsure if her children will recognize her. Her children welcome her home, and so does Nick.

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