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“The Olympics – Hully Gully”

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The Olympics (band)
Not to be confused with Olympic (band).

The Olympics are an American doo-wop group, formed in 1957 by lead singer Walter Ward (August 28, 1940 – December 11, 2006). The group included Eddie Lewis (tenor, Ward’s cousin), Charles Fizer (tenor), Walter Hammond (baritone) and Melvin King (bass) and except for Lewis were friends in a Los Angeles, California, high school.

In 1959 the group recorded “(Baby) Hully Gully,” which initiated the hully gully dance craze. “Big Boy Pete,” which the group released in 1960, served as inspiration for The Kingsmen’s “Jolly Green Giant.” Over the next ten years The Olympics recorded upbeat R&B songs, often about dances popular at the time.

Hully Gully
For the 1959 song, see Hully Gully (song)

The Hully Gully is a type of unstructured line dance often considered to have originated in the sixties, but is also mentioned some forty years earlier as a dance common in the black juke joints in the first part of the twentieth century.[1] In its modern form it consisted of a series of “steps” that are called out by the MC. Each step was relatively simple and easy to execute; however, the challenge was to keep up with the speed of each step.

The phrase “Hully Gully” or “Hull da Gull” comes from a folk game in which a player shakes a handful of nuts or seeds and asks his opponent “Hully Gully, how many?”[2]

The Hully Gully was started by Frank Rocco at the Cadillac Hotel in Miami Beach, Florida. In 1959 The Olympics sang the song “Hully Gully”, which involved no physical contact at all. In 1961 the Olympics version of the song was popularized in the south of England by the first version of Zoot Money’s Big Roll Band and involved the audience facing the stage in lines and dancing the steps of the “Southampton jive”.[3] The same tune appeared in 1961 in a song by the Marathons, entitled “Peanut Butter”, which was later used for the Peter Pan Peanut Butter commercial during the 1980s. Tim Morgan sang different lyrics to the song “Peanut Butter” as well, however, only mentioning the Skippy” brand. There was another song about the dance by the Dovells, entitled “Hully Gully Baby”. The Jive Five had a hit called “Hully Gully Callin’ Time”; Ike & Tina Turner had a song in their repertoire known as “If You Can Hully Gully (I Can Hully Gully Too)”. Ed Sullivan mentioned the Cadillac Hotel as “Home of the Hully Gully” on his weekly show, featuring some dancers from Frank Rocco’s revue. Known as “Mr. Hully Gully”, Rocco then toured America (including the 1964 New York World’s Fair—he danced it with Goldie Hawn) and Europe, where over the next year he taught the dance at the NATO Base in Naples, Italy, in Rome, and all over Europe.

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Posted by on May 22, 2017 in nostalgic

 

 “The Untouchables – 1959 – TV Series – ABC” 

Genre Crime drama

Starring Robert Stack

Abel Fernandez

Nicholas Georgiade

Paul Picerni

Steve London

Bruce Gordon

Neville Brand

Narrated by Walter Winchell

Theme music composer Nelson Riddle

Composer(s) Bill Loose

Jack Cookerly

Nelson Riddle

Country of origin United States

Original language(s) English

No. of seasons 4

No. of episodes 118 & two-part pilot (list of episodes)

Production

Executive producer(s) Alan A. Armer

Desi Arnaz

Leonard Freeman

Quinn Martin

Jerry Thorpe

Producer(s) Alan A. Armer

Alvin Cooperman

Walter Grauman

Bert Granet

Paul Harrison

Herman Hoffman

Sidney Marshall

Vincent McEveety

Del Reisman

Norman Retchin

Lloyd Richards

Stuart Rosenberg

Charles Russell

Josef Shaftel

Cinematography Robert B. Hauser

Glen MacWilliams

Charles Straumer

Camera setup Single-camera

Running time 50 minutes

Production company(s) Desilu Productions

Langford Productions

Distributor Desilu Sales (until 1967)

Paramount Domestic Television (1967–2006)

CBS Paramount Domestic Television (2006–2007)

CBS Television Distribution (2007– )

Release

Original network ABC

Picture format Black-and-white

Audio format Monaural

Original release October 15, 1959 – May 21, 1963


The Untouchables is an American crime drama that ran from 1959 to 1963 on the ABC Television Network, produced by Desilu Productions. Based on the memoir of the same name by Eliot Ness and Oscar Fraley, it fictionalized Ness’ experiences as a Prohibition agent, fighting crime in Chicago in the 1930s with the help of a special team of agents handpicked for their courage, moral character, and incorruptibility, nicknamed the Untouchables. The book was later made into a film in 1987 (also called The Untouchables) by Brian De Palma, with a script by David Mamet, and a second, less-successful TV series in 1993.

A powerful, dynamic, hard-hitting action drama, and a landmark crime series,[1] The Untouchables won series star Robert Stack an Emmy Award for Best Actor in a Dramatic Series in 1960.[2]
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“1962 commercial – Charlie The Tuna Has A Girlfriend”

 
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Posted by on May 22, 2017 in nostalgic

 

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“Making Dr. Pepper the old-fashioned way”  

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Posted by on May 22, 2017 in nostalgic

 

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THE ORIGIN OF BARBEQUE


I am offering you three versions  now of the origin:

Here is The First Version:

First of all,  the word barbeque  is misused.  When you  cook steaks, hot dogs and hamburgers (and whatever else you want) on the grill, well hello…..guess what? That is called Grilling!

Cooking meat over an open fire has been around since the cave man. But the cave man didn’t BBQ. Why? Because he had no sauce. LOL! Actually, as far as we know, the cave men just grilled over an open fire.

So just what is barbequing?  Now pay attention. It will probably end up being a question on “Jeopardy” someday! <wink>  

To barbeque (going to use BBQ from now on since it’s so hard to type) is slow-cooking meat at a low temperature for a long time over wood or charcoal.  Not gas!  Although, most of us without a discerning culinary palette (like me) don’t know the difference.

BBQ began in the late 1800’s during cattle drives out West.  The men had to be fed (cowboys) and the boss (cattle baron) didn’t want to feed them the good meat. So, other disposable cuts were used to feed the men. The main choice for this was Brisket, which is a very tough, stringy piece of meat.  However, the cowboys learnt that if you left this brisket to cook for a long period of time (5-7 hours) at approximately 200 degrees (although I don’t know how they  knew the temperature over a fire?) that wha-la!  A super yummie meal was to be had.  Besides Brisket,  other meats that they found to BBQ well, were pork butt, pork ribs, beef ribs, venison and goat.

The basic BBQ grill is a cooking chamber with an offset firebox or a water smoker.  The average Kmart gas grill is not for BBQ, but for grilling.  Today BBQ is a hobby — or passion with some — and enjoyed by millions of Americans each year.   I guess it’s one of the things we as Americans can claim as “authentic” and part of our culture and not a cooking style that has been brought from another country.


To BBQ is to truly cook American (although its original origin debatable and argued to not come from America at all.)

You know what they say? “When in Rome…do as the Romans.” This can apply to BBQ also.  Different areas of the country have different meat priorities and preparations.  For example, in the Southeast, pork is the preferred meat to BBQ.  Digging a pit (to concentrate cooking heat and smoke) goes back to European culture. Then it was forgotten until the Jamestown colonists arrived.  Since pigs were running around freely to fatten themselves up, (only to be captured and eaten later) pork became the sustenance meat of Virginia and later the southern states.  This also was a blessing when crops didn’t produce as they should for whatever reasons.

Texas seems to love beef barbeque, which seems logical due to all the cattle in the region.

And, it’s my own personal experience that the West coast, especially Californians, seem to love chicken or seafood to BBQ.  When I lived in California, I know the popular beach BBQ was to let swordfish marinate in a dish filled with a teriyaki mixture overnight and then BBQ the next day.  In Santa Barbara, on the 4th of July, it’s a traditional custom to go dig a pit on the beach to party in and BBQ in.

Below I have some traditional BBQ recipes.  But, the sauce is what seems to define a BBQ chef or restaurant.  In the South they seem to like thinner BBQ sauces, with a more vinegary tone.  Other parts of the US prefer the thick, sweet, tomato BBQ sauce.  But in Texas they season their beef with a dry-rub mixture of seasonings.

There are even quirky BBQ’s in some restaurants or areas of the United States.  In the early 1900’s, New Yorkers loved turtle BBQ. I think that got replaced by New York pizza or cheesecake?  I recall vacationing in Wyoming a few years back and coming across a restaurant that offered BBQ Buffalo meat.  (BTW I tried it and it was delicious!)

There is also some argument that clambakes are nothing but a spin-off of traditional BBQs because they are cooked in a pit.  Others claim that the BBQ idea evolved from the fisherman’s clambakes. So which came first, the BBQ or the clambake?  

It’s undeniable that BBQ is popular and well-loved in American society. But, BBQ tastes and cooking differ.  Real BBQ purists claim that a restaurant that offers its customers a grilled piece of meat slapped with some sauce later isn’t eating real BBQ at all.  Others say it is, as long as the sauce is there, then it’s BBQ!

Every year the Kansas City Barbecue Society (KCBS) sponsors barbecue competitions all over the US. The biggest one of all is the American Royal (sounds like a rodeo huh?) held every October at guess where? Yup, Kansas City.   I’ve never attended, but rumor has it that you can’t find a steak, hot dog or hamburger there. Nope, it’s nothing but real cuts of meat. And, I will assume shrimp, buffalo, turtle, snake, venison, elk, etc?

(Information  source for the above information on BBQ  is from  posts I read on the American Cooking Bulletin Board and my own personal experiences.)

Read The Second and Third Versions

https://www.brownielocks.com/bbq.html

 
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Posted by on May 22, 2017 in historic, nostalgic

 

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“P.S. I LOVE YOU – 1963”

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The Classics were an American vocal group formed in 1958 in Brooklyn.

The Classics first sang together in high school; two of them had previously sung in a group called The Del-Rays. In 1959, under the auspices of manager Jim Gribble, they recorded their first single, “Cinderella”; the record Bubbled Under the US Hot 100 in early 1960. The follow-up, “Angel Angela”, also narrowly missed the national charts, and the 1961 single “Life Is But a Dream” hit the lower regions of the Black Singles chart when Mercury Records picked it up for national distribution, but it wasn’t until they released the single “Blue Moon” with Herb Lance on lead vocals that they charted a hit. The song peaked at #50.

The group signed with Musicnote Records in 1963 and released “Till Then”, which became their biggest hit, peaking at #20 on the pop charts and #7 AC.

The group was best remembered for its ballads, and frequently sang versions of pop standards from the 1920s and 1930s. They frequently changed labels over the course of their career, and parted ways about 1966. Member Emil Stucchio revived the name to tour in the 1970s and again in the 1990s and 2000s.In the 1990s, the group was Stuccio, former Mystic Al Contrera, Scott LaChance, and Michael Paquette.Later it was Stuccio, Contrera, LaChance, and Teresa McClean. LaChance later left the group.

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“Island In The Sun (1957) ” 

Island in the Sun is a 1957 De Luxe in CinemaScope drama film produced by Darryl F. Zanuck and directed by Robert Rossen. It features an ensemble cast including James MasonHarry BelafonteJoan FontaineJoan CollinsDorothy DandridgeMichael RennieStephen BoydPatricia OwensJohn JustinDiana Wynyard, and Basil Sydney. The film is about race relations and interracial romance set in the fictitious island of Santa Marta. Barbados and Grenada were selected as the sites for the movie based on the 1955 novel by Alec Waugh. The film was controversial at the time of its release.

PlotEdit

The film follows several characters, black, white and mixed race, and their relationships. It also chronicles the social inequality between the British who colonized the island, and the native population. Maxwell Fleury (James Mason) is a white plantation owner’s son who suffers from an inferiority complex and makes rash decisions to prove his worth. He is tormented by jealousy of his wife, Sylvia (Patricia Owens), and is envious of his younger sister Jocelyn (Joan Collins), who is being courted by the Oxford-bound Euan Templeton (Stephen Boyd), a war hero visiting the Governor of the island, his father Lord Templeton (Ronald Squire).

David Boyeur (Harry Belafonte), a young black man emerging as a powerful politician, represents the common people and is seen by some as a threat to the white ruling class. Mavis Norman (Joan Fontaine), a woman from the elite white class, strikes up a romantic interest in Boyeur and much of the story explores the tension between these two.

There is also an interracial romance between Margot Seaton (Dorothy Dandridge), a mixed-race drugstore clerk, and Denis Archer (John Justin), aide to the Governor.

Maxwell believes that Hilary Carson (Michael Rennie) is having an affair with his wife. He strangles Carson during a quarrel, then tries to make it look like a robbery. Colonel Whittingham (John Williams), the head of police, investigates the murder.

A journalist named Bradshaw (Hartley Power) writes an expose revealing that Maxwell’s grandmother was part black. Maxwell has decided to run for the legislature, but is jeered by the crowd, then insults everyone there.

Jocelyn learns she is pregnant, but does not wish to burden Euan with a child of mixed race. Her mother reveals that Jocelyn’s father was actually a white man, the result of an undisclosed affair. She and Euan board a plane to England, as do Margot and Denis, to begin new lives.

Maxwell, a broken man, contemplates suicide, then decides to go to Whittingham to confess. Mavis wishes to marry Boyeur and begin a new life of her own, but he decides the needs of the island and his people must come first.

en.Wikipedia.org

https://youtu.be/w74u2NFKGPI

 

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