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Category Archives: 1940s

Some Men Will Do The Oddest Things…Just For Fun And At A Price. WATCH: “Tiny Tim – Tip Toe Through The Tulips (Live).mp4” on YouTube

Some Men Will Do The Oddest Things…Just For Fun And At A Price. WATCH: “Tiny Tim – Tip Toe Through The Tulips (Live).mp4” on YouTube

Tiny Tim, Singer, Dies at 64; Flirted, Chastely, With Fame

Tiny Tim, whose quavery falsetto and ukulele made ”Tiptoe Through the Tulips With Me” a novelty hit in 1968, died on Saturday night at the Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis. He was 64 and had lived in Minneapolis for the past year.

By WILLIAM GRIMES
Published: December 2, 1996

April 12, 1932 – November 30, 1996

Tiny Tim

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“JOHNSON’S WAX FLOOR POLISHER COMMERCIAL 1950s”

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wax floors

The company began when Samuel Curtis Johnson, Sr. purchased the parquet flooring business of Racine Hardware Company in 1886 and renamed it Johnson’s Prepared Paste Wax Company. Management has since passed down through five generations of the Johnson family; the longevity of this dynasty is itself unusual. In 1939, the first part of the Johnson Wax Building, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, opened. Its addition, the Research Tower, opened in 1950.

From April 1935 until May 1950, the company was the sponsor for the Fibber McGee & Molly radio show, officially known as The Johnson Wax Program; each episode featured an appearance by pitchman and Johnson representative Harlow Wilcox. To maximize show time, Wilcox was written into the script as a Johnson’s-obsessed friend of the McGees (Fibber nicknamed him “Waxy”) who would show up mid-episode and managed to get an ad into his lines, often using extremely far-fetched segues for comedic effect. Common products advertised on the show were Johnson’s Wax, Johnson’s Glo-Coat, and Johnson’s Car-Nu.

Also during the 1950s, the company served as sponsor of the game show, The Name’s the Same; alternating with Swanson, also co-sponsoring Robert Montgomery Presents on NBC, and later on CBS, The Red Skelton Show .

In 1984, Cornell University renamed its business school the S.C. Johnson Graduate School of Management in recognition of the Johnson family’s long generosity to that institution.

In 1992, the company bought Drackett, manufacturer of Windex, Drāno and other specialty cleaning products. In 1997, S.C. Johnson expanded its roster of consumer brands when it purchased Dow Chemical’s DowBrands division, which included Ziploc, Saran, Fantastik, Glass Plus, Scrubbing Bubbles, and Spray ‘n Wash.[2] Dow Chemical purchased Texize in 1986, in which it received the Fantastik and Glass Plus brand. The company received approval for the deal in 1998 from the Federal Trade Commission by agreeing to sell the Glass Plus and Spray ‘n Wash brands to competitor Reckitt Benckiser.

In 1999, the commercial cleaning products and systems division separated from Johnson Wax and became a stand-alone company called Johnson Wax Professional. In 2002, it acquired DiverseyLever to become JohnsonDiversey Inc., and in 2009, it became Diversey, Inc.[3]

The current Chairman and CEO, Dr. Herbert Fisk Johnson III, is the fifth generation of the Johnson family to lead the company. He succeeds his father, Samuel Curtis Johnson, Jr., who died in May 2004.

The company was one of three 2006 recipients of the Ron Brown Award for corporate leadership.

From 2005 to 2011, S. C. Johnson & Son was ranked by Fortune Magazine as one of the top 10 “Companies to Work For” in their annual ranking. In 2007, the company was ranked #7; In 2011, they were ranked #10.

Despite its large size, the company remains privately owned by the Johnson family, and is currently in its fifth generation of family ownership.

en.m.wikipedia.org

 

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“Vintage 1954 Hotpoint Appliances ~ Animated Ozzie, Harriet, David & Ricky Nelson”

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History
Formation in California
Hotpoint was founded in 1911. The name of the company comes from the hot point of the revolutionary first electric iron of 1905, invented by the American (Wisconsin) Earl Richardson (1871–1934) having formed his Pacific Electric Heating Company in Ontario, California, in 1906.[1][2] It was known as the Hotpoint iron, with its hottest point at the front and not the center. In 1912 the company began making electric irons, and electric cookers in 1919 in the USA. Earl Richardson also invented the first iron that switched off automatically when a maximum temperature was reached.

Hotpoint sign in Great Barrington, MA
It is claimed to have developed one of the earliest electric toasters in 1908, known as the El Tosto, and later, under GE, the Hotpoint brand name became one of the most popular brands of toaster in the USA in the 1920s and 1930s. Richardson founded his own settlement, Adelanto, California, in 1915.

In 1918, the company, known as the Hotpoint Electric Heating Company from 1912, merged with the Heating Device Section of General Electric, becoming the Edison Electric Appliance Company, and later, just a division of GE in 1927, when it bought the factory and entire company. It became known as the Edison General Electric Company in 1931.

In 2014, Electrolux agreed to buy General Electric’s household appliances business including the Hotpoint brand in North America for £2bn ($3.3bn). The deal was expected to close in 2015.[3] Due to blockage by U.S. regulators, the Electolux deal was terminated, and GE subsequently sold its appliance division to Haier of China, to close .

 

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“Bobby Vinton ~ Blue Velvet (HQ)”

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“Blue Velvet” is a popular song written in 1950 by Bernie Wayne and Lee Morris. The song was originally recorded and performed by Tony Bennett, who charted with it in 1951. It was remade four years later by the traditional R&B group the Clovers. Many other artists have recorded the song, most notably Bobby Vinton. The original recording by Bennett was a top twenty hit, while Vinton’s version soared to the number one position on the Billboard Hot 100.

Background

While visiting friends in Richmond VA songwriter Bernie Wayne stayed at the Jefferson Hotel, and it was the sight of a woman at a party held at the Jefferson which inspired Wayne to write the lyric for “Blue Velvet”.[2] When Wayne pitched “Blue Velvet” to Columbia Records head a&r man Mitch Miller he’d only played the opening line: “She wore blue velvet…”, when Miller interrupted saying: “How about [my giving the song to] Tony Bennett?” Wayne’s response: “Don’t you want to hear the rest of the song”, drew this advice from Miller: “Quit while you’re ahead!”[3]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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WHATEVER HAPPEN TO S&H GREEN STAMPS?

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S&H Green Stamps were trading stamps popular in the United States from the 1930s until the late 1980s. They were distributed as part of a rewards program operated by the Sperry & Hutchinson company (S&H), founded in 1896 by Thomas Sperry and Shelley Byron Hutchinson. During the 1960s, the company promoted its rewards catalog as being the largest publication in the United States and boasted that it issued three times as many stamps as the U.S. Postal Service. Customers would receive stamps at the checkout counter of supermarkets, department stores, and gasoline stations among other retailers, which could be redeemed for products in the catalog.[citation needed]

S&H Green Stamps had several competitors, including Gold Bell Gift Stamps (in the Midwest), Triple S Stamps (offered by Grand Union Supermarkets), Gold Bond Stamps, Blue Chip Stamps, Plaid Stamps (a project of A&P Supermarkets), Top Value Stamps, and Eagle Stamps (a project of several divisions of the May Department Stores Co. of St. Louis, Missouri and offered, notably, by May Company stores, supermarkets, drug stores, gas stations, and dry cleaners in the Cleveland, Ohio area).

 

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“Louis Armstrong – A Kiss To Build A Dream On [1962] Live”

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“A Kiss to Build a Dream On” is a song composed by Bert Kalmar, Harry Ruby and Oscar Hammerstein II in 1935.[1] It was recorded by Louis Armstrong in 1951.[1] It was also performed by Armstrong as well as by Mickey Rooney with William Demarest, by Sally Forrest, and by Kay Brown (virtually the entire cast performed part or all of the song) in the 1951 film “The Strip,” and was a sort of recurring theme in the film. Another popular recording was made by one of the movies guest-stars, Monica Lewis, and in early 1952, the version by Hugo Winterhalter and his Orchestra, with vocalist Johnny Parker, made it to the Pop 20 chart in the United States.

Sung by Richard Chamberlain, the song gained considerable exposure due to its being on the ‘B’ side of his 1962 hit: “Theme from Dr. Kildare (Three Stars Will Shine Tonight)”.

Rod Stewart covered the song in his 2004 album, Stardust: the Great American Songbook 3.

Deana Martin recorded A Kiss to Build a Dream On in 2009. The song was released on her album, Volare, in 2009 by Big Fish Records.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

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“The Chiffons – One fine day ( 1963 )”

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One Fine Day” is a popular song by songwriters Gerry Goffin and Carole King which was a hit in the summer of 1963 for girl group the Chiffons and has subsequently been covered by numerous artists.

The Chiffons version

Background
Goffin and King were inspired by the title of the aria Un bel di vedremo from the Puccini opera Madama Butterfly. Intended for Little Eva, “One Fine Day” was prepped as a demo by Goffin and King with King providing a guide vocal but – despite a propulsive piano riff courtesy of King – Goffin and King were unable to construct a viable arrangement and eventually gave up, passing the song to the Tokens who had recently produced the #1 hit “He’s So Fine” by the Chiffons for whom it was thought another “fine” song had hit potential. The piano work by King (whose vocal was erased) was retained for the Chiffons’ recording and King attended the session at which the Chiffons recorded their vocals. However the Tokens radically re-worked the Goffin/King demo of “One Fine Day” for the Chiffons’ version; Gerry Goffin commented that the Tokens “really earned their production credit”. The personnel on the original recording included Carl Lynch on guitar, Dick Romoff on bass, Artie Kaplan, Sid Jekowsky, and Joe Grimaldi on sax, and Gary Chester and Buddy Saltzman on drums.[1][2]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on May 10, 2018 in 1940s, 1960s, nostalgic

 

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