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Category Archives: 1950s

“DREAM A LITTLE DREAM OF ME – Doris Day … includes Rosemary Clooney, Joni James and Mama Cass Elliot versions”

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“Dream a Little Dream of Me” was recorded by Ozzie Nelson and his Orchestra, with vocal by Nelson, on February 16, 1931 for Brunswick Records. Two days later, Wayne King and His Orchestra, with vocal by Ernie Birchill, recorded the song for Victor Records. “Dream a Little Dream of Me” was also an early signature tune of Kate Smith. In the summer of 1950, seven recordings of “Dream a Little Dream of Me” were in release, with the versions by Frankie Laine and Jack Owens reaching the US Top 20 at respectively #18 and #14: the other versions were by Cathy Mastice, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Jordan, Vaughn Monroe, Dinah Shore and a duet version by Bing Crosby and Georgia Gibbs. Other traditional pop acts to record “Dream a Little Dream of Me” include Louis Armstrong, Barbara Carroll, Nat King Cole, Doris Day, Joni James, and Dean Martin.

The song was again recorded in 1968 by Mama Cass Elliot with The Mamas & the Papas, and then by Anita Harris. More than 40 other versions followed, including by the Mills Brothers, Sylvie Vartan, Henry Mancini, The Beautiful South, Anne Murray, Erasure, Michael Bublé, and Italian vocal group Blue Penguin (see below: List of recorded versions).

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Man In The Moon (plot and trailer) – Reese Witherspoon. In the summer of 1957…

Man In The Moon (plot and trailer) – Reese Witherspoon. In the summer of 1957…

Dani Trant is a 14-year-old girl in Louisiana who, according to her father, is “too big to be running off by herself.” Dani and her older sister Maureen, who is going off to college in the fall, are very close. Maureen helps take care of their younger sister, Missy, while their mother Abigail is pregnant.

Dani however prefers to run off to the neighbor’s creek to go swimming in the nude. It is here that she meets her new neighbor, 17-year-old Court Foster. Court kicks Dani out of his creek. When Dani goes home, her mother tells her to wash up because an old childhood friend is coming for dinner with her children. The Trants’ old friend turns out to be a widow, Mrs. Foster with her three sons Court, Dennis, and Rob. When Dani realizes who Court is, the two dislike each other. Court calls Dani “a little girl”. When Dani’s father Matthew tells Dani to accompany Court into town for groceries, Dani and Court drive into town and start to get along. Dani finally realizes that she is in love with Court.

Maureen goes on a date to a dance with her boyfriend Billy Sanders. When they leave the dance, Billy wants to park his car and have sex. Maureen gets angry and breaks up with Billy because she believes “love should be beautiful”. The next day, Dani asks Maureen for advice on how to kiss a boy. Maureen demonstrates by practicing on her hand. Dani and Court continue to go swimming during the hot sunny days and become very close friends. The two agree to meet to go swimming at night, since Court has too much work to do during the day. Dani sneaks off and swims with Court until they reach the point where they are about to kiss. Court pushes Dani away and says she is a little girl that doesn’t know what she’s doing, and runs off home. Dani leaves too just as a thunderstorm is breaking out. Abigail wakes up, knowing Dani isn’t home, and runs outside looking for her. Just as Dani gets home, and runs to her mother, her mother also runs and trips on a root, falls and hits her head. Dani’s father races her to the hospital, where she is kept for treatment (concussion and toxemia). When her father returns home from the hospital, he spanks Dani with his belt. The next day, Court brings food to the Trant house and apologizes to Dani for the other night. Dani, still hurt, just ignores him at first, until Court says he would still like to be friends. The next time they go swimming the two share Dani’s first kiss. Dani is still hurt and angry at her father for hitting her. When he tries to talk to her the next day feeling remorseful for using his belt on her, she only replies with “Yes Sir” or “No Sir” to his questions.

Once Dani has made up with her father, he tells Dani to invite Court over once in a while so he can get to know him better. When Court comes over for dinner, he finally meets Maureen. Dani can tell it is love at first sight for the two of them. While Dani visits her mother in the hospital, Court comes over to the Trant house and kisses Maureen. Over the next few days, Dani is getting pushed away by Court. While the rest of the family goes to pick up Abigail and the new baby from the hospital, Court and Maureen claim their love for each other, consummating their love in a field. When Maureen leaves for home, Court goes back to plowing the fields and falls off the tractor, and is badly injured. Dani sees this, and races home to tell her father. When Matthew returns home, he has some of Court’s blood on his clothes and the family realizes that Court has died. Maureen hides her pain at first, while Dani bursts into tears. After Court’s funeral, Dani continues to be angry at Maureen for stealing Court away from her. Matthew tells Dani that although she has a right to be hurt, being mad won’t bring Court back, and Maureen will be her sister for life. Dani comforts Maureen as she weeps on Court’s fresh grave, and the film ends with Maureen and Dani talking outside on the porch at night as the summer draws to a close, looking up at the moon becoming close again.

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Posted by on April 23, 2018 in 1950s, nostalgic

 

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“Mr. Blue ( Bobby Vinton Lyrics)”

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Stanley Robert “Bobby” Vinton, Jr. (born April 16, 1935) is an American pop music singer of Polish and Lithuanian ethnic background. In pop music circles, he became known as “The Polish Prince of Poch”, as his music pays tribute to his Polish heritage. Known for his angelic vocals in love songs, his most popular song, “Blue Velvet” (a cover of Tony Bennett’s 1951 song), peaked at No. 1 on the now renamed Billboard Pop Singles Chart. It also served as inspiration for the film of the same name.

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Blue on Blue is Bobby Vinton’s sixth studio album, released in 1963. Cover versions include the jazz songs “St. Louis Blues” and “Blueberry Hill”, “Am I Blue”, “Blue, Blue Day”, the Fleetwoods’ hit “Mr. Blue“, “My Blue Heaven”, three show tunes (“Blue Skies”, “Blue Hawaii” and “Blue Moon”), and The Clovers Rhythm and blues hit, “Blue Velvet”.

The song “Blue on Blue” was mentioned in Kim Mitchell’s hit song “Patio Lanterns”.

Composition and Background

Completely devoted to songs that refer to the color blue, this album contained two singles: “Blue on Blue”, which reached #3 on the U.S. Pop charts and “Blue Velvet”, which went on to #1 for three weeks on the same chart.[1] Both songs served as title tracks during their popularity.[1] The album was released after the success of the song “Blue on Blue”, but when “Blue Velvet” became a hit, the album’s title was changed with it being the title track.[1] It was only after the title change that the album managed to enter the Billboard 200 list of popular albums; it reached #10.[1]

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“Be my baby – The Ronettes”

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The Ronettes were an American girl group from New York City. One of the most popular groups from the 1960s, they placed nine songs on the Billboard Hot 100, five of which became Top 40 hits. The trio from Spanish Harlem, New York,[1] consisted of lead singer Veronica Bennett (later known as Ronnie Spector), her older sister Estelle Bennett and their cousin Nedra Talley. Among the Ronettes’ most famous songs are “Be My Baby”, “Baby, I Love You”, “(The Best Part of) Breakin’ Up”, and “Walking in the Rain”, all of which charted on the Billboard Hot 100. “Walking in the Rain” won a Grammy Award in 1965, and “Be My Baby” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999.[2] The Ronettes were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2007.

The girls had sung together since they were teenagers, when they were known as “The Darling Sisters”. Signed first by Colpix Records in 1961, they moved to Phil Spector’s Philles Records in March 1963, and changed their name to “The Ronettes.” In late 1964, the group released their only studio album, Presenting the Fabulous Ronettes Featuring Veronica, which entered the Billboard charts at number 96. Rolling Stone ranked it number 422 on its list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[3] The group were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2004. The Ronettes were the only girl group to tour with the Beatles.

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“I’m Blue [The Gong Gong Song ] The Ikettes “

“I’m Blue [The Gong Gong Song ] The Ikettes “

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The Ikettes

were a trio (sometimes quartet) of female backing vocalists for the Ike & Tina Turner Revue. Despite their origins, the Ikettes became successful artists in their own right, with hits in the early- and mid-1960s. Mostly unheralded, they were arguably one of the ten top R&B female groups of all time.

The group’s origins began with the Artettes, the backing group of Art Lassiter. The first official incarnation of The Ikettes was comprised of Robbie Montgomery, Venetta Fields, and Jessie Smith; Ike never paid them much, which caused their lineup to change frequently, and they never received royalties.[citation needed] The original trio of Ikettes later morphed into the Mirettes.

The Gong Gong Song

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“Shep & the Limelites – Daddy’s Home”

“Shep & the Limelites – Daddy’s Home”

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Shep and the Limelites was an American doo-wop group of the early 1960s,[1] composed of James “Shep” Sheppard (September 24, 1935 – January 24, 1970), Clarence Bassett (March 13, 1936 – January 25, 2005) and Charles Baskerville (July 6, 1936 – January 18, 1995). They are best known for their 1961 hit recording, “Daddy’s Home”, co-written by Sheppard.

Career

Sheppard and Bassett, both from Queens County, New York, and Baskerville, originally from Virginia, organized a group in Queens in 1960. This was billed initially as Shane Sheppard And The Limelites, but quickly became Shep and the Limelites. All three had previous experience in other groups: Shep with The Heartbeats (notable for “A Thousand Miles Away”); Bassett with The Five Sharps and then, with Baskerville, in The Videos.[1]

Shep & The Limelites’ recording sessions for Hull Records started in August 1960. They recorded the original version of “Daddy’s Home” on February 1, 1961. “Daddy’s Home” reached no. 2 on the Billboard popular music chart in May,[1] and was covered by P J Proby (1970) Jermaine Jackson (1972), Toots and the Maytals (Funky Kingston 1973), Junior English, and Cliff Richard (1981). Later songs were not as successful as “Daddy’s Home”, but still sold well; among these were “What Did Daddy Do”, “Ready For Your Love” and “Our Anniversary”.[2]

Kahl Music, publisher of “A Thousand Miles Away”, an earlier song written by Sheppard, sued Keel Music, publisher of “Daddy’s Home”, for copyright violation. Keel eventually lost, and this resulted in the end of the Limelites and Hull Records in 1966. Bassett joined The Flamingos and Baskerville joined The Players and then The Drifters.[1] Sheppard re-formed the Limelites in the late 1960s, but was murdered on January 24, 1970.[1] He died in his car on the Long Island Expressway as a result of injuries sustained in a robbery.[2][3] Baskerville died, at age 58 on January 18, 1995 in New York.[4] Bassett died on January 25, 2005, at age 68 from the complications of emphysema, at his home in Richmond, Virginia.[5]

James Sheppard’s legacy includes the composing of rock ‘n’ roll’s first song cycle. Writing songs for both the Heartbeats and Shep and the Limelites, he tells the story of going home to his girl, with twists along the way, getting married, and celebrating their anniversary. The songs that told this story were “A Thousand Miles Away”, “500 Miles to Go”, both with the Heartbeats; and then “Daddy’s Home”, “Three Steps from the Altar,” “Our Anniversary”, and “What Did Daddy Do?” for Shep and the Limelites.[6]

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“What’s Your Name?/Don and Juan”

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Don and Juan were an R&B vocal duo from Brooklyn, NY, consisting of Roland “Don” Trone and Claude “Juan” Johnson. Johnson had previously sung with a doo-wop group called the Genies, who reached #71 on the Billboard pop charts in 1959 with “Who’s That Knockin'” on the Shad label. (Contrary to doo-wop lore, Trone was never with the Genies.) Their two hits were “What’s Your Name”, and a lesser hit, “Magic Wand”.

Don & Juan’s sole top 40 hit was “What’s Your Name” on Big Top Records, which climbed to #7 on the Billboard pop charts in 1962.

Roland Trone died in May 1982 at age 45; Claude Johnson died on October 31, 2002, at age 67.

Their hit “What’s Your Name” was featured on the soundtrack of It Came from Hollywood in 1982. It is considered one of the signature classics of the doo-wop vocal style. This song was recently nominated to the Doo-Wop Hall of Fame. “What’s Your Name” was also mentioned in the film “Flipped” 2010 by fictional characters portraying “Don and Juan”.

In the 1998 film Slam, there is a brief scene where two police officers are driving while arguing over the lyrics to “What’s Your Name”.

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