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Category Archives: 1960s

“The Penguins – Memories Of El Monte”

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“Memories of El Monte”

is a metasong released in 1963 by the Penguins featuring Cleve Duncan. It was written by Frank Zappa and Ray Collins before they were in the Mothers of Invention. The song was first released as Original Sound 27.[2]

Composition

In 1960, Art Laboe released one of the first oldies compilations, Memories of El Monte, a collection of songs by bands that used to play at the dances Laboe organized at El Monte Legion Stadium in El Monte, California.[3]

At some point in the next few years, Ray Collins visited Frank Zappa at his house at 314 W. G Street in Ontario, California (34.070685°N 117.653339°W).[4] Frank told him that he and a friend had thought of writing a song entitled “Memories of El Monte.” Ray had been to the dances at El Monte Legion Stadium and had played there with tenor saxophonist Chuck Higgins. Ray sat down at Frank’s piano, played the “Earth Angel” chord changes and immediately came up with the first lyrics for “Memories of El Monte.”

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Frank Zappa took the song to Art Laboe, who loved it. Laboe came up with the idea of adding a section that named doo-wop groups and having the Penguins impersonate their songs.[3] The song functions as a de facto advertisement for the collection Memories of El Monte when it references songs on the compilation.

“Memories of El Monte” was recorded at Paul Buff’s Pal Recording Studio in Cucamonga, California in 1963.[5] The song was copyrighted on February 20, 1963.[6]

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“THE DELICATES – I WANT TO GET MARRIED”

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The Delicates formed in South Central Los Angeles as the Darlenes after Richie Darlene Henderson, aka Darlene Walton, formed the group with Freddie Poole, Billie Rae Calvin, and Brenda Joyce. Discographers always lumped their recordings with a previous and more successful Delicates’ group that recorded on Unart, United Artists, Roulette, and possibly Celeste Records, but they were two separate entities. These Delicates recorded on Challenge, Soultown, and Pulsar Records. They signed their first contract while in junior high school after wowing ’em at Friday night Sock Hops, or Canteens as they were called in some areas. Ex-Robin writer and producer H. B. Barnum acted as the liaison for their initial studio sessions. At the time, Barnum was busy arranging for Lou Rawls, Holland-Dozier-Holland, and others, producing the O’Jays on Imperial Records, and running Little Star Records, among other things. Barnum later managed the Honey Cone, the Sweet Inspirations, a later-day edition of the Toys, with original June Montero and two new members. The Toys’ project ended faster than the original Toys from New York, NY (who couldn’t get along). Bobby Sanders took over from Barnum and played a major role in the production of their recordings and subsequent deal with Challenge, a label that initially (1957-1958) was owned in part by TV cowboy Gene Autry; Autry sold his interest in 1958. Berry Gordy was also interested and had Frank Wilson and Hal Davis cut a demo on them entitled “Crying,” written by Davis and Vincente Love, but Motown only wanted Poole and the deal never materialized.

They debuted on Challenge late in 1964 as the Delicates with “I’ve Been Hurt” (written by Love) b/w “C’mon Everybody.” 1965 saw two final releases on Challenge: “I Want to Get Married,” a Bobby Sanders/Darlene Walton song, and “Stop Shovin’ My Heart Around” b/w “Comin’ Down With Love.” Nothing sold outside of Watts, so they left to kick off Sanders’ Soultown label with a reworking of “Stop Shovin’ My Heart Around” as “Stop Shovin’ Me Around.” A final single on Pulsar Records, Sanders and Jerry Flanagan’s “I’ve Got a Crush on You” undersided by “You Said You Love Me,” ended the Delicates career as front-line recording artists, but opened the door for lucrative careers as session singers, particularly, Brenda Joyce and Billie Rae Calvin, who sang on the Four Tops’, Diana Ross’, and Edwin Starr’s recordings.

It’s been said that Bobby Taylor reintroduced Joyce and Calvin to Motown, but it was Norman Whitfield who put the two in the spotlight by grouping them with Joe Harris (Moroccos, Peps, and Ohio Players) to form Undisputed Truth’s original lineup, the one that glossed with “Smiling Faces Sometimes.” But success was fleeting, after a couple of albums, the Magictones, an unsuccessful Detroit vocal group, replaced the soft singing femmes, and with Whitfield’s tinkering, changed the sound into an amalgamation of psychedelic/soul/and metal-rock. In 2001, Freddie Poole was still singing with Sherrie Payne and Lynda Laurence as the Former Ladies of the Supremes. ~ Andrew Hamilton, Rovi…

http://www.mtv.com/artists/the-delicates/biography/

 
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Posted by on December 11, 2017 in 1960s, female vocalists

 

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“Doris Troy – Just One Look”

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Just One Look” is a song co-written by American R&B singers Doris Troy and Gregory Carroll. The recording by Doris Troy was a hit in 1963. The Hollies, Anne Murray and Linda Ronstadt recorded hit versions of their own. There have also been many other versions of this song.

Doris Troy version

Background
Details vary as to how the Doris Troy version came to be released on Atlantic Records. According to the book Billboard Book of One-Hit Wonders,[2] James Brown saw Troy performing in a nightclub (under her then-stage name Doris Payne), and introduced her to Atlantic.[3] According to a more recent and detailed story in Soulful Divas,[4] Payne recorded a studio demo of the song and took it to Sue Records first, but their lack of response led her to offer it to Jerry Wexler at Atlantic, where the label released the demo unchanged. The personnel on this song included Horace Ott on Piano, Snags Allen on guitar, Barney Richmond on bass and Bruno Carr on drums (although legendary session musician Bernard Purdie has claimed that he was the actual drummer on the demo).[3]

Reception
In 1963, Doris Troy scored her only hit on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart with “Just One Look”. The song spent 14 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at No. 10,[5] while reaching No. 3 on Billboard ’​s Hot R&B Singles chart,[6] No. 8 on New Zealand’s “Lever Hit Parade”,[7] and No. 1 on Canada’s CHUM Hit Parade.[8] The single’s release was the first time she started using “Doris Troy” as her stage name, though her pen name remained Doris Payne.[3]

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“BEAUTY SECRETS Of The 1950’s! (w/selected highlights)”

“BEAUTY SECRETS Of The 1950’s! (w/selected highlights)”

What Your 1950s Beauty Routine Would Have Looked Like, According To Judy Blume

By COURTNEY MINA 

In these modern times, we have arguably developed a great love for all things vintage: Vintage clothing, vintage shoes, vintage hairstyles, and even vintage furniture. You may be someone who has the vintage “look” down pat, but have you ever wondered what a vintage ’50s beauty routine would actually be like? I have been reading Judy Blume’s most recent novel in the Unlikely Event.

The story takes place in the early 1950s, focusing on the lives of several people affected by the plane crashes that took place in Elizabeth, New Jersey at the time. In between all of the “unlikely events” that occur, the book does a wonderful job of providing all sorts of little details about life in the ’50s, including ones about the lead female protagonist’s shopping and beauty routines.

Personally, I was amazed to realize just how different things were back then. I mean, sure, we may achieve the same “vintage look and style” in 2015 as they did back then (think pinup dresses, dramatic winged eyeliner, and red lips Marilyn Monroe-style) but the actual methods, routines, and products we use are extremely different today than those of the actual ’50s. Since a lot of us possess a love for all things retro, let’s take a look at seven examples of what your beauty and shopping routine would look like if you lived in the ’50s, according to Judy Blume.

1. Baths And All-Purpose Soap Bars

A lot of us hop into the shower first thing in the morning. If you lived in the ’50s, however, Blume’s books imply that you’d most likely be taking a bath instead. Forget using your special soaps from your favorite mall shop as well. You’d most likely be using an  all-purpose bar soap (Palmolive, Sunlight, or a Fels-Naptha soap bar, to name a few) to rinse away the daily grime. These bars were also used for laundry, believe it or not

2. Primp And Powder

When it came to makeup, there was no Ulta available for you to pick up your liquid foundation and contouring set at. Instead, you’d probably be purchasing an all-in-one base and powder in a compact form. According to the Hair And Makeup Artist Handbook, Max Factor, Revlon, Pond, and Avon were the most popular skincare and cosmetic brands at the time.

Most likely, you’d also own a Volupté compact: A decorated compact case that contained powder and a puff. A little blush, winged eyeliner (if you were going for a glamorous look), mascara, and a shade of red lipstick (none of the crazy colors we rock today) would have been applied to your face to complete the perfect look.

3. A Wondrous Wardrobe

If you lived in the ’50s, your closet was likely filled with cardigans and sweater sets, blouses with embroidered collars, dresses with ballerina-length hems and cinched waists (for an hourglass look), pencil skirts, pleated shorts, saddle shoes (also known as “casual Oxfords”), heels (for dressier occasions), pantyhose, nylons, slips, girdles, and a pair of cat-eye glasses or two. It’s possible that your clothing would also be made of natural materials, such as cotton and/or wool. Looking “glamorous” was all the rage, so you would frequently dress to present in a “put together” kind of way.

4. Department Store Shopway

In the ’50s, “malls” weren’t really a thing yet. According to The Guardian, the first mall ever built in America was actually the Southdale Shopping Center in Edina, Minnesota, which opened in 1956. Chances are that back in the ’50s you would have shopped at independently owned stores near where you lived.

For a more elevated shopping experience, however, department stores were much more popular. These were usually located in the downtown area of larger cities, and visiting one would likely feel much more like an “outing” and a “treat” than it does today.

5. Lingerie Stores

Back in the day, folks didn’t have quite as an elaborate selection of bras and underwear as we do today. Young girls mainly wore plain, white cotton bras and underwear that you would buy from the department store. However, women of the ’50s were in love with with glamour and the hourglass waist look, so corsets and girdles were extremely popular, along with silk slips and nylons. If you wanted to buy any of these items, you had to head over to a special lingeriestore (which sold more glamorous undergarments) to buy a half slip for $3.99.

6. Spend Your Evening In A Nightgown

After you took off your saddle shoes, clothing, nylons, and girdle at the end of the day, chances are you’d slip into something much more comfortable: A Lanz nightgown, which was all the rage and the “nighttime fashion” of the time.
                                                                                        7. Set Your Curls

The most popular way to style your hair was cut short or just above the shoulders, worn lose and glamorously waved, or curled (think bob, bubble cut, poodle cut, bouffant, pageboy or pixie cut). Most women would set their hair in curlers and sleep with them in overnight, either using foam, pin, or rag rollers. Some would even cover their hair with a cap to protect the locks while they slept. Others still would simply try to sleep as still as they possibly could.Well, it certainly takes a lot to be glamorous. Some things never change.
Source:  https://www.bustle.com/articles/99305-what-your-1950s-beauty-routine-would-have-looked-like-according-to-judy-blume

Images: The Weinstein Company (2); Pixabay (1); 20th Century Fox (1); AMC (2); Paramount Pictures (1); Mirisch Company (1)

 

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“Do You Want to Dance-Bobby Freeman-original song-1958”

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“Do You Want to Dance”

is a song written by

Bobby Freeman

and recorded by him in 1958. It reached number No. 5 on the United States Billboard Top 100 Sides pop chart and No. 2 on the Billboard R&B chart.[1][2][3] Cliff Richard and the Shadows’ version of the song reached No. 2 in the United Kingdom in 1962, despite being a B-side. The Beach Boys’ version reached No. 8 as “Do You Wanna Dance?” in the United States in 1965, and a 1972 cover by Bette Midler (“Do You Want to Dance?”) reached No. 17.

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Posted by on December 5, 2017 in 1950s, 1960s, nostalgic

 

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“Maxine Brown – All In My Mind”

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Maxine Brown (born April 27, 1932) is an American country music singer who was originally a member of the successful 1950s trio, The Browns, before a brief solo career.

Biography

Brown was born in Campti, Louisiana, but her family moved to a farm near Pine Bluff, Arkansas when she was a toddler. Encouraged by her parents, she began singing and performing at local venues. Brown signed a recording contract in 1954 with RCA Records as half of a duo with younger brother Jim Ed Brown. They earned national recognition and a guest spot on Ernest Tubb’s radio show for their humorous song “Looking Back to See,” which hit the top ten and stayed on the charts through the summer of 1954.[1]

Their younger sister Bonnie Brown joined them in 1955. In 1959, The Browns scored their biggest hit when their folk-pop single “The Three Bells” reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop and country charts. They became members of the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee in 1963, and disbanded in 1967.

Brown had a brief solo career during the late 1960s, releasing a single and an album for Chart Records titled Sugar Cane County.

Her autobiography, Looking Back to See, was published in 2005 by The University of Arkansas Press. It delivered a revealing first-hand account of the American country music business in the 1950s and 1960s.

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WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS ….America’s Salt History

WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS ….America’s Salt History

Morton Salt is an American company producing salt for food, water conditioning, industrial, agricultural, and road/highway use. Based in Chicago,[1] the business is North America’s leading producer and marketer of salt. It is a subsidiary of the German company K+S.
The company began in Chicago, Illinois, in 1848 as a small sales agency, E. I. Wheeler, started by the Onondaga salt companies to sell their salt to the Midwest. In 1910, the business, which had by that time become both a manufacturer and a merchant of salt, was incorporated as the Morton Salt Company.[2] It was named after the owner and founder, Joy Morton, the son of J. Sterling Morton[3] who founded Arbor Day. Joy Morton starting working for E. I. Wheeler in 1880, buying into the company for $10,000, with which he bought a fleet of lake boats to move salt west.[4] In 1982, the business was purchased by Thiokol Corporation, producing Morton Thiokol Incorporated (MTI). Morton Thiokol divested itself of Morton in 1989, following the 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, which was blamed on Morton Thiokol products. Morton received the company’s consumer chemical products divisions, while Thiokol retained only the space propulsion systems concern.

In 1999

Morton Salt

was acquired by the Philadelphia-based Rohm and Haas Company, Inc. and operated as a division of that company[2] along with the Canadian Salt Company (which Morton had acquired in 1954).[3]

On 2 April 2009, it was reported that Morton Salt was being acquired by German fertilizer and salt company K+S for a total enterprise value of US$1.7bn.[5] The sale, completed by October 2009, was in conjunction with the Dow Chemical Company’s takeover of Rohm and Haas.[6][7][8]

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More on Morton salt history:

How A Little Girl Grew Up To Be An Icon

Watch “Morton Salt Girl’s 100th Birthday” on YouTube

 

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