RSS

Category Archives: 1960s

“DREAM A LITTLE DREAM OF ME – Doris Day … includes Rosemary Clooney, Joni James and Mama Cass Elliot versions”

hqdefault.jpgdorisday

“Dream a Little Dream of Me” was recorded by Ozzie Nelson and his Orchestra, with vocal by Nelson, on February 16, 1931 for Brunswick Records. Two days later, Wayne King and His Orchestra, with vocal by Ernie Birchill, recorded the song for Victor Records. “Dream a Little Dream of Me” was also an early signature tune of Kate Smith. In the summer of 1950, seven recordings of “Dream a Little Dream of Me” were in release, with the versions by Frankie Laine and Jack Owens reaching the US Top 20 at respectively #18 and #14: the other versions were by Cathy Mastice, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Jordan, Vaughn Monroe, Dinah Shore and a duet version by Bing Crosby and Georgia Gibbs. Other traditional pop acts to record “Dream a Little Dream of Me” include Louis Armstrong, Barbara Carroll, Nat King Cole, Doris Day, Joni James, and Dean Martin.

The song was again recorded in 1968 by Mama Cass Elliot with The Mamas & the Papas, and then by Anita Harris. More than 40 other versions followed, including by the Mills Brothers, Sylvie Vartan, Henry Mancini, The Beautiful South, Anne Murray, Erasure, Michael Bublé, and Italian vocal group Blue Penguin (see below: List of recorded versions).

en.m.Wikipedia.org

Advertisements
 

Tags:

“What’s Easy for Two Is Hard for One” – Mary Wells

“What’s Easy for Two Is Hard for One” – Mary Wells

What’s Easy for Two Is Hard for One” (also known as “What’s Easy for Two Is So Hard for One“) is a song written and produced by Smokey Robinson and released as a single by singer Mary Wells for the Motown label.

Song information

In this song, the narrator is longing for a longtime partnership with a suitor and constantly begs the man to “take her to the preacher man” in hopes the couple does “what should be done” because “what two can easily do is so hard to be done by one”.

Release and reaction

Released in mid-1963, the song returned Wells to the top 30 where it peaked at number 29 on the Billboard Hot 100 (and #8 R&B). Wells covered the song at least two more times

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on April 24, 2018 in 1960s, female vocalists, r&b

 

Tags:

MOVE OVER DARLING STARRING DORIS DAY AND JAMES GARNER

image

Move Over, Darling is a 1963 comedy film starring Doris Day, James Garner, and Polly Bergen and directed by Michael Gordon. The picture was a remake of a 1940 screwball comedy film, My Favorite Wife, with Irene Dunne, Cary Grant and Gail Patrick. In between these movies, an unfinished version entitled Something’s Got to Give began shooting in 1962, directed by George Cukor and starring Marilyn Monroe (who was fired and died soon after) and Dean Martin.

The film was chosen as the 1964 Royal Film Performance and had its UK premiere on 24 February 1964 at the Odeon Leicester Square in the presence of H.R.H. Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

Plot
Ellen Wagstaff Arden (Doris Day), a mother of two young girls named Jenny and Didi, was believed to be lost at sea following an airplane accident. Her husband, Nick Arden (James Garner), was one of the survivors.

image

After five years of searching for her, he decides to move on with his life by having her declared legally dead so he can marry Bianca (Polly Bergen), all on the same day. However, Ellen is alive; she is rescued and returns home that particular day. At first crestfallen, she is relieved to discover from her mother-in-law Grace (Thelma Ritter) that her (ex-) husband’s honeymoon has not started yet.

When Nick is confronted by Ellen, he eventually clears things up with Bianca, but he then learns that the entire time Ellen was stranded on the island she was there with another man, the handsome, athletic Stephen Burkett (Chuck Connors) – and that they called each other “Adam” and “Eve.”

Nick’s mother has him arrested for bigamy and all parties appear before the same judge that married Nick and Bianca earlier that day. Bianca and Ellen request divorces before the judge sends them all away. Bianca leaves Nick, while Ellen storms out, still married to Nick, declared alive again. Ellen returns to Nick’s house unsure if her children will recognize her. Her children welcome her home, and so does Nick.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
 

Tags:

“Mr. Blue ( Bobby Vinton Lyrics)”

image

Stanley Robert “Bobby” Vinton, Jr. (born April 16, 1935) is an American pop music singer of Polish and Lithuanian ethnic background. In pop music circles, he became known as “The Polish Prince of Poch”, as his music pays tribute to his Polish heritage. Known for his angelic vocals in love songs, his most popular song, “Blue Velvet” (a cover of Tony Bennett’s 1951 song), peaked at No. 1 on the now renamed Billboard Pop Singles Chart. It also served as inspiration for the film of the same name.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

Blue on Blue is Bobby Vinton’s sixth studio album, released in 1963. Cover versions include the jazz songs “St. Louis Blues” and “Blueberry Hill”, “Am I Blue”, “Blue, Blue Day”, the Fleetwoods’ hit “Mr. Blue“, “My Blue Heaven”, three show tunes (“Blue Skies”, “Blue Hawaii” and “Blue Moon”), and The Clovers Rhythm and blues hit, “Blue Velvet”.

The song “Blue on Blue” was mentioned in Kim Mitchell’s hit song “Patio Lanterns”.

Composition and Background

Completely devoted to songs that refer to the color blue, this album contained two singles: “Blue on Blue”, which reached #3 on the U.S. Pop charts and “Blue Velvet”, which went on to #1 for three weeks on the same chart.[1] Both songs served as title tracks during their popularity.[1] The album was released after the success of the song “Blue on Blue”, but when “Blue Velvet” became a hit, the album’s title was changed with it being the title track.[1] It was only after the title change that the album managed to enter the Billboard 200 list of popular albums; it reached #10.[1]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

Tags: ,

“Sunset Boulevard (1950) trailer”

“Sunset Boulevard (1950) trailer”

wp-1477313531734.jpeg

Sunset Boulevard (stylized onscreen as SUNSET BLVD.) is a 1950 American black comedy/drama film noir[3] directed and co-written by Billy Wilder, and produced and co-written by Charles Brackett. It was named after the boulevard that runs through Los Angeles and Beverly Hills, California.

The film stars William Holden as Joe Gillis, an unsuccessful screenwriter, and Gloria Swanson as Norma Desmond, a faded silent movie star who draws him into her fantasy world where she dreams of making a triumphant return to the screen, with Erich von Stroheim as Max Von Mayerling, her devoted servant. Nancy Olson, Fred Clark, Lloyd Gough and Jack Webb play supporting roles. Director Cecil B. DeMille and gossip columnist Hedda Hopper play themselves, and the film includes cameo appearances by leading silent film actors Buster Keaton, H. B. Warner and Anna Q. Nilsson.

Praised by many critics when first released, Sunset Boulevard was nominated for eleven Academy Awards (including nominations in all four acting categories) and won three. It is widely accepted as a classic, often cited as one of the greatest films of American cinema. Deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” by the U.S. Library of Congress in 1989, Sunset Boulevard was included in the first group of films selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. In 1998, it was ranked number twelve on the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 best American films of the 20th century, and in 2007 it was 16th on their 10th Anniversary list.

Plot
At a Sunset Boulevard mansion, the body of Joe Gillis floats in the swimming pool. In a flashback, Joe relates the events leading to his death.

Six months earlier, down-on-his-luck screenwriter Joe tries selling Paramount Pictures producer Sheldrake on a story he submitted. Script reader Betty Schaefer harshly critiques it in Joe’s presence, unaware that he is the author. Later, while fleeing from repossession men seeking his car, Joe turns into the driveway of a seemingly deserted mansion. After concealing the car, he hears a woman calling him, apparently mistaking him for someone else. Ushered in by Max, her butler, Joe recognizes the woman as long-forgotten silent film star Norma Desmond. Learning he is a writer, she asks his opinion of a script she has written for a film about Salome. She plans to play the role herself in a comeback. Joe finds her script abysmal, but flatters her into hiring him as a script doctor.

Moved into Norma’s mansion at her insistence, Joe resents but gradually accepts his dependent situation. He sees that Norma refuses to face the fact that her fame has evaporated and learns the fan letters she still receives are secretly written by Max, who tells him Norma is subject to depression and has made suicide attempts.

images-137.jpegwp-1477313531748.jpeg

Norma lavishes attention on Joe and buys him expensive clothes. At her New Year’s Eve party, he discovers he is the only guest and realizes she has fallen in love with him. He tries to let her down gently, but she slaps him and retreats to her room.

images-205.jpeg

Joe visits his friend Artie Green to ask about staying at his place. At Artie’s party, he again meets Betty, who he learns is Artie’s girl. Betty thinks a scene in one of Joe’s scripts has potential, but Joe is uninterested. When Joe phones Max to have him pack his things, Max tells him Norma cut her wrists with his razor. Joe returns to Norma.

Norma has Max deliver the edited Salome script to her former director, Cecil B. DeMille, at Paramount. She starts getting calls from Paramount executive Gordon Cole, but petulantly refuses to speak to anyone except DeMille. Eventually, she has Max drive her and Joe to Paramount in her 1929 Isotta Fraschini.[4] The older studio employees warmly greet her. DeMille receives her affectionately and treats her with great respect, tactfully evading her questions about Salome. Meanwhile, Max learns that Cole merely wants to rent her unusual car for a film.

Preparing for her imagined comeback, Norma undergoes rigorous beauty treatments. Joe secretly works nights at Betty’s Paramount office, collaborating on an original screenplay. His moonlighting is found out by Max, who reveals that he was once a respected film director. He discovered Norma as a teenage girl, made her a star and was her first husband. After she divorced him, he found life without her unbearable and abandoned his career to become her servant.

images-221.jpeg

Although Betty is engaged to Artie, she and Joe fall in love. Norma discovers a manuscript with Joe’s and Betty’s names on it. She phones Betty and insinuates what sort of man Joe really is. Joe, overhearing, invites Betty to come see for herself. When she arrives, he pretends he is satisfied being a kept man, but after she tearfully leaves, he packs to return to his old Ohio newspaper job. He disregards Norma’s threat to kill herself and the gun she shows him to back it up. He bluntly tells her the public has forgotten her, there will be no comeback, and the fan letters are from Max. As Joe walks away, Norma shoots him three times. He falls into the pool.

The flashback ends. The house is filled with police and reporters. Norma, having lost touch with reality, believes the newsreel cameras are there to film Salome. Max and the police play along. Max sets up a scene for her and calls “Action!” As the cameras roll, Norma dramatically descends her grand staircase. She pauses and makes an impromptu speech about how happy she is to be making a film again, ending with: “All right, Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my close-up.”[5]

wp-1477313531747.jpegimages-138.jpeg

Cast
William Holden as Joseph C. “Joe” Gillis
Gloria Swanson as Norma Desmond
Erich von Stroheim as Maximillian “Max” von Mayerling
Nancy Olson as Betty Schaefer
Fred Clark as Sheldrake, Paramount Producer
Lloyd Gough as Morino, Joe’s agent
Jack Webb as Arthur “Artie” Green
Franklyn Farnum as Undertaker
Larry J. Blake as Finance man #1
Charles Dayton as Finance man #2
As Themselves:

Cecil B. DeMille
Hedda Hopper
Buster Keaton (Bridge player)
Anna Q. Nilsson (Bridge player)
H. B. Warner (Bridge Player)
Ray Evans (Pianist at Artie’s party)
Jay Livingston (Pianist at Artie’s party)
Henry Wilcoxon as Actor (uncredited)

en.m Wikipedia.org

 

Tags: , ,

“Patsy Cline Sweet Dreams”

image

Virginia Patterson Hensley
(September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963),
known professionally as …

Patsy Cline

was an American singer. Part of the early 1960s Nashville sound, Cline successfully “crossed over” to pop music and was one of the most influential, successful and acclaimed vocalists of the 20th century.[1][2] She died at the age of 30 in a multiple-fatality crash in the private plane of her manager, Randy Hughes.

Cline was best known for her rich tone, emotionally expressive and bold contralto voice[3] and her role as a country music industry pioneer. Along with Kitty Wells,[4] she helped pave the way for women as headline performers in the genre. Cline was cited as an inspiration by singers in several styles.[5] Books, movies, documentaries, articles and stage plays document her life and career.

Her hits began in 1957 with Donn Hecht’s and Alan Block’s “Walkin’ After Midnight”, Hank Cochran’s and Harlan Howard’s “I Fall to Pieces”, Hank Cochran’s “She’s Got You”, Willie Nelson’s “Crazy” and ended in 1963 with Don Gibson’s “

Sweet Dreams.”

Millions of her records have sold since her death. She won awards and accolades, causing many to view her as an icon at the level of Jim Reeves, Johnny Cash and Elvis Presley. Ten years after her death, in 1973, she became the first female solo artist inducted to the Country Music Hall of Fame. In 1999, she was voted number 11 on VH1’s special, The 100 Greatest Women in Rock and Roll, by members and artists of the rock industry.[6] In 2002, country music artists and industry members voted her Number One on CMT’s The 40 Greatest Women of Country Music and ranked 46th in the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time” issue of Rolling Stone magazine. According to her 1973 Country Music Hall of Fame plaque, “Her heritage of timeless recordings is testimony to her artistic capacity.”

en.m.Wikipedia.org

“Patsy Cline – Sweet dreams (of you) – 1963” on YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7k2SsEqAyv8&feature=youtube_

 

Tags:

“Be my baby – The Ronettes”

image

The Ronettes were an American girl group from New York City. One of the most popular groups from the 1960s, they placed nine songs on the Billboard Hot 100, five of which became Top 40 hits. The trio from Spanish Harlem, New York,[1] consisted of lead singer Veronica Bennett (later known as Ronnie Spector), her older sister Estelle Bennett and their cousin Nedra Talley. Among the Ronettes’ most famous songs are “Be My Baby”, “Baby, I Love You”, “(The Best Part of) Breakin’ Up”, and “Walking in the Rain”, all of which charted on the Billboard Hot 100. “Walking in the Rain” won a Grammy Award in 1965, and “Be My Baby” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999.[2] The Ronettes were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2007.

The girls had sung together since they were teenagers, when they were known as “The Darling Sisters”. Signed first by Colpix Records in 1961, they moved to Phil Spector’s Philles Records in March 1963, and changed their name to “The Ronettes.” In late 1964, the group released their only studio album, Presenting the Fabulous Ronettes Featuring Veronica, which entered the Billboard charts at number 96. Rolling Stone ranked it number 422 on its list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[3] The group were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2004. The Ronettes were the only girl group to tour with the Beatles.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

Tags:

 
%d bloggers like this: