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Category Archives: 1960s

“P.S. I LOVE YOU – 1963”

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The Classics were an American vocal group formed in 1958 in Brooklyn.

The Classics first sang together in high school; two of them had previously sung in a group called The Del-Rays. In 1959, under the auspices of manager Jim Gribble, they recorded their first single, “Cinderella”; the record Bubbled Under the US Hot 100 in early 1960. The follow-up, “Angel Angela”, also narrowly missed the national charts, and the 1961 single “Life Is But a Dream” hit the lower regions of the Black Singles chart when Mercury Records picked it up for national distribution, but it wasn’t until they released the single “Blue Moon” with Herb Lance on lead vocals that they charted a hit. The song peaked at #50.

The group signed with Musicnote Records in 1963 and released “Till Then”, which became their biggest hit, peaking at #20 on the pop charts and #7 AC.

The group was best remembered for its ballads, and frequently sang versions of pop standards from the 1920s and 1930s. They frequently changed labels over the course of their career, and parted ways about 1966. Member Emil Stucchio revived the name to tour in the 1970s and again in the 1990s and 2000s.In the 1990s, the group was Stuccio, former Mystic Al Contrera, Scott LaChance, and Michael Paquette.Later it was Stuccio, Contrera, LaChance, and Teresa McClean. LaChance later left the group.

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“Linda Scott – I’ve Told Every Little Star”

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Linda Scott (born Linda Joy Sampson, June 1, 1945 (New York City) [1]) is an American pop singer who was active from the late 1950s to the early 1970s. Her biggest hit was the 1961 million-selling single, “

I’ve Told Every Little Star

“[1] She went on to place twelve songs on the charts over the next four years, the last being “Who’s Been Sleeping In My Bed,” inspired by the film and written by the songwriting team of Hal David and Burt Bacharach.

Biography
Born in Queens, New York, Linda Sampson was 11 years old when she moved with her family to Teaneck, New Jersey. She was still in school (Teaneck High School) when she auditioned to appear on Arthur Godfrey’s hit CBS Radio show in 1959.[2] After having won a place on the show, Scott and other young performers became regular guests on the show. During the show’s run, the young singer came to the attention of Epic Records, and Scott made her recording debut (singing as Linda Sampson) with the single, “In-Between Teen”.[3]

Though still in high school, in 1961 she signed with Canadian-American Records, which had struck gold with the Santo & Johnny’s “Sleep Walk”. The label changed her performing name to Linda Scott, producing and releasing the hit “I’ve Told Every Little Star,” a standard written by Oscar Hammerstein II and Jerome Kern for their 1932 production Music In The Air.[4] The track sold over one million copies, earning Scott a gold disc.[1]

Scott’s three biggest hits came in that first year, with “I’ve Told Every Little Star” (U.S. #3), “I Don’t Know Why” (U.S. #12), and “Don’t Bet Money, Honey” (U.S. #9). The first two were standards, while the third was one of Scott’s own compositions.

Scott was the showcase artist when Canadian-American started a subsidiary label, Congress Records, in 1962, and in fact both labels released new material of hers simultaneously. The following year, she sang her hit “Yessirree” in the Chubby Checker vehicle, Don’t Knock the Twist. Scott’s final U.S. chart appearance was “Who’s Been Sleeping In My Bed,” released in January 1964, the same month that The Beatles made their first chart appearance. In 1965, she became a cast member of the TV rock show Where the Action Is, which she co-hosted with singer Steve Alaimo. Her last U.S. recording, “They Don’t Know You”, was released in 1967 on RCA Records. She continued to record as a backing vocalist (most notably on Lou Christie’s 1969 hit, “I’m Gonna Make You Mine”) before finally quitting show business in the early 1970s to pursue studies in theology.[citation needed]

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“Jennell Hawkins Moments To Remember”

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Jennell Ruth Hawkins (née Grimes, April 8, 1938 – October 13, 2006) was an American R&B and jazz singer and musician who recorded in the 1950s and early 1960s, and had a US Top 50 chart hit in 1961 with “Moments To Remember”.

Biography

Jennell “Jenny” Grimes was born in Los Angeles, and while at Jefferson High School formed a singing group, the Fidelitones, with friends Marc Gordon (later a successful songwriter and record producer), Ray Brewster, and Bill Piper. She also became acquainted with fellow pupil and aspiring songwriter Richard Berry, and in 1954 she and Berry recorded one of his songs, “Each Step”, with arranger Maxwell Davis, which was released on the Flair label, credited to Ricky and Jennell. She also played piano on “My Aching Heart” by the Flippers in 1955.[1] Although initially reluctant, as she saw herself as more of a pianist and organ player than a singer, she joined Berry’s backing group, the Dreamers, and sang lead on the Dreamers’ own 1957 single, “Since You’ve Been Gone.”[1][2] She married Lawrence Hawkins in 1956,[3] and around that time joined another vocal group, the Combonettes, who recorded three singles for the Combo label, including “Hi Diddle Diddle”.[1]

She made her first solo recordings in 1961, releasing “I Pity You Fool” on the Dynamic label before recording Richard Berry’s song “Moments To Remember” on the small Titanic label. The record became locally successful and, retitled ”

“Moments”, was reissued by the larger Amazon record label owned by DJ Rudy Harvey. The record rose to no.16 on the national Billboard R&B Chart, and no.50 on the pop chart. She followed it up in 1962 with a version of Barrett Strong’s hit “Money (That’s What I Want)”, co-written by Berry Gordy, which reached no.17 on the R&B chart.[4] She also released two albums on the Amazon label, The Many Moods of Jenny (1961), credited to the

Jennell Hawkins Quintet, and Moments To Remember (1962).[1][2]  However, Hawkins became disillusioned with Harvey’s business practices (he was later the victim of an unsolved murder), and she left the recording business soon afterwards to devote herself to her family and church. She later worked for funeral companies, driving a hearse and playing the organ at funerals. In the 1970s she re-emerged with a sextet to back Johnny Morisette on his jazz-funk recording of “I’m Hungry”. She also performed occasionally with her sextet in Los Angeles nightclubs, often appearing together with saxophonist Big Jay McNeely. In 2002, she reunited with the Dreamers to perform at a doo wop revival event.[1][2] She suffered a serious stroke in 2005, and died the following year at the age of 68, on the day she was due to receive a mayoral certificate to recognise her contributions to local music.[1][2]

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“THE DELICATES – I WANT TO GET MARRIED”

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The Delicates formed in South Central Los Angeles as the Darlenes after Richie Darlene Henderson, aka Darlene Walton, formed the group with Freddie Poole, Billie Rae Calvin, and Brenda Joyce. Discographers always lumped their recordings with a previous and more successful Delicates’ group that recorded on Unart, United Artists, Roulette, and possibly Celeste Records, but they were two separate entities. These Delicates recorded on Challenge, Soultown, and Pulsar Records. They signed their first contract while in junior high school after wowing ’em at Friday night Sock Hops, or Canteens as they were called in some areas. Ex-Robin writer and producer H. B. Barnum acted as the liaison for their initial studio sessions. At the time, Barnum was busy arranging for Lou Rawls, Holland-Dozier-Holland, and others, producing the O’Jays on Imperial Records, and running Little Star Records, among other things. Barnum later managed the Honey Cone, the Sweet Inspirations, a later-day edition of the Toys, with original June Montero and two new members. The Toys’ project ended faster than the original Toys from New York, NY (who couldn’t get along). Bobby Sanders took over from Barnum and played a major role in the production of their recordings and subsequent deal with Challenge, a label that initially (1957-1958) was owned in part by TV cowboy Gene Autry; Autry sold his interest in 1958. Berry Gordy was also interested and had Frank Wilson and Hal Davis cut a demo on them entitled “Crying,” written by Davis and Vincente Love, but Motown only wanted Poole and the deal never materialized.

They debuted on Challenge late in 1964 as the Delicates with “I’ve Been Hurt” (written by Love) b/w “C’mon Everybody.” 1965 saw two final releases on Challenge: “I Want to Get Married,” a Bobby Sanders/Darlene Walton song, and “Stop Shovin’ My Heart Around” b/w “Comin’ Down With Love.” Nothing sold outside of Watts, so they left to kick off Sanders’ Soultown label with a reworking of “Stop Shovin’ My Heart Around” as “Stop Shovin’ Me Around.” A final single on Pulsar Records, Sanders and Jerry Flanagan’s “I’ve Got a Crush on You” undersided by “You Said You Love Me,” ended the Delicates career as front-line recording artists, but opened the door for lucrative careers as session singers, particularly, Brenda Joyce and Billie Rae Calvin, who sang on the Four Tops’, Diana Ross’, and Edwin Starr’s recordings.

It’s been said that Bobby Taylor reintroduced Joyce and Calvin to Motown, but it was Norman Whitfield who put the two in the spotlight by grouping them with Joe Harris (Moroccos, Peps, and Ohio Players) to form Undisputed Truth’s original lineup, the one that glossed with “Smiling Faces Sometimes.” But success was fleeting, after a couple of albums, the Magictones, an unsuccessful Detroit vocal group, replaced the soft singing femmes, and with Whitfield’s tinkering, changed the sound into an amalgamation of psychedelic/soul/and metal-rock. In 2001, Freddie Poole was still singing with Sherrie Payne and Lynda Laurence as the Former Ladies of the Supremes. ~ Andrew Hamilton, Rovi…

http://www.mtv.com/artists/the-delicates/biography/

 
 

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Papa Oom Mow Mow”

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The Rivingtons

were a 1960s doo-wop group. The group members were: lead vocalist Carl White (died January 7, 1980), tenor Al Frazier (died November 13, 2005), baritone Sonny Harris, and bass singer Turner “Rocky” Wilson, Jr.. Frazier was replaced by Madero White for a period in the late 1970s.[1]

History

Previously, the Rivingtons had been known as the Sharps, and they had already had success in the charts with Thurston Harris’s “Little Bitty Pretty One” in 1957, after which they appeared on several Duane Eddy recordings when any extraneous sounds of rebel yells were required, as on Eddy’s 1958 hit “Rebel Rouser”.[1] They also recorded on Warner Brothers Records as The Crenshaws in 1961.[1]

Their first hit as the Rivingtons was ”

Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow

” (Liberty #55427, 1962). Like many such songs, it began with the bass chanting nonsense syllables (in this case the title), followed by the tenor singing over repetitions of it.[citation needed] “Mama-Oom-Mow-Mow”, an even more baroque rewrite of the theme, failed to sell, but they returned to the charts the following year with the similar “The Bird’s the Word”. The B-side of “Mama-Oom-Mow-Mow” was “Waiting” (Liberty #55528[1]).

After their two hit singles, the Rivingtons struggled to find another hit. However, “Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow” and “The Bird’s the Word” were revived, courtesy of a Minnesota-based group calling itself the Trashmen, who made a song up in 1963 from the two songs’ nonsense syllables, calling it “Surfin’ Bird”. The Trashmen recorded the selection over a record shop and passed it off as their own work.[2] It was a medley of the choruses without the verses.[3][4][5] However, the Rivingtons’s management reported it to their lawyers, and the group members were ordered to add the surnames of the Rivingtons to the credits.[6] After the publicity surrounding the allegations in Billboard, the Trashmen had to share the writing credits on not only this recording but also a later one as a sign of good faith. “Surfin’ Bird” itself was revived in the 1970s by the Ramones[7] and the Cramps.[8]

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“1963 Chevrolet Commercial, WHEN CARS WERE AMERICAN MADE.”

“1963 Chevrolet Commercial, WHEN CARS WERE AMERICAN MADE.”

Imagine… the 1960s automobiles. America manufactured its own vehicles and used its own resources for gas fuels.  Travel was easy, inexpensive and fun. Life was simple, families were wholesome and so were American conveniences.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axM3yYEES64&feature=youtube_gdata_player

 
 

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“The Chantels – Look In My Eyes”

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The Chantels were the second African-American girl group to enjoy nationwide success in the United States, preceded by The Bobbettes. The group was established in the early 1950s by students attending St. Anthony of Padua School in The Bronx. The original five members consisted of Arlene Smith (lead), Sonia Goring, Rene Minus, Jackie Landry Jackson and Lois Harris. They derived their name from that of a rival school, St. Frances de Chantal.

Career

In 1957 the Chantels, then in high school, had been singing as a group for several years. Unlike some black groups whose influences were based in gospel, the quintet was influenced by classical music and Latin hymns.[1] Lead singer Arlene Smith had received classical training and performed at Carnegie Hall at age 12.[1] She provided both lyrics and music.[1] The girls were discovered by Richard Barrett, lead singer of The Valentines, and by the summer of 1957 they were signed to End Records, owned by George Goldner.[1] Their first single was “He’s Gone” (Pop #71) in August 1957, written by Arlene Smith.[1] Released in December 1957, their second single, “Maybe,” was a hit (#15 Billboard Hot 100; #2 R & B chart) in January 1958. It sold over a million copies and was awarded a gold disc.[2] The following releases were less successful but End did release an album originally titled We Are the Chantels. The original cover had a photo of the group. That album was soon withdrawn and repackaged with a picture of two white teenagers picking out a song; the title was shortened to The Chantels.[3]

The group was dropped by End in 1959, and Arlene Smith embarked upon a solo career. Harris left to pursue a college education. That year Chantels singles led by Richard Barrett were released on the End subsidiary label, Gone. In 1960 Annette Smith (no relation to Arlene) replaced Arlene Smith. As a quartet the group moved to Carlton Records, where they had their second huge hit with “Look in My Eyes” (#14 pop, #6 R&B). Other releases on Carlton didn’t do as well. One song was “Well I Told You,” a response to the Ray Charles song “Hit the Road, Jack.[1] A Carlton album was released in 1962 titled The Chantels on Tour but featured no live recordings and only seven tracks were recorded by the actual group. The other three tracks were by Gus Backus, Chris Montez and Little Anthony & The Imperials.[4][5] To cash in on “Look in My Eyes”, End threw together an album titled There’s Our Song Again, a compilation of previously recorded material.[3]

The Chantels switched record labels a few more times. Although personnel changed throughout the 1960s, the constants in the group were Jackie Landry, Sonia Goring and Renee Minus. This line-up, plus Arlene Smith, recorded a one-off single for RCA in 1970. Smith fronted a new group called Chantels in the 1970s which featured up-and-coming disco diva Carol Douglas and former Gems vocalist Louise Bethune (who would also become a 1970s performing member of The Crystals). Smith continued to perform solo. In 1995 the remaining original Chantels reformed as well and hired Noemi (Ami) Ortiz as their lead singer. On the PBS special Doo Wop 50, Smith reunited with the surviving original members of The Chantels and dedicated “Maybe” to Jackie Landry, who died in 1997.

The Chantels were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2002. In 2001 they made the final ballot for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame,[6] but without enough votes for induction. Despite continued appearances since then on Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ballots by 1950s doo-wop groups, The Chantels did not get enough votes to reach any subsequent ballot until September 2009, when it was revealed that they were one of 12 nominees to be inducted to the Hall in 2010.

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