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Category Archives: 1970s

“Folgers Coffee 1960’s Vintage Ad”

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The precursor of the Folger Coffee Company was founded in 1850 in San Francisco, California, U.S., as the Pioneer Steam Coffee and Spice Mills. William H. Bovee, the owner of the Pioneer Steam Coffee and Spice Mills, saw an opportunity to produce roasted and ground coffee ready for brewing. Before that, Californians had to purchase green coffee beans and roast and grind them on their own. To help build his mill, Bovee hired James A. Folger[1] as a carpenter. James had arrived from Nantucket Island at the age of 15 with his two older brothers during the California Gold Rush. In the 1850s, kerosene began to offer a cheaper alternative to whale oil, which had been Nantucket’s life-blood, resulting in the re-purposing of many of its ships to bring coffee from South America to San Francisco.[2] After working at Bovee’s mill for nearly a year, James had saved enough money to stake a claim in the company and headed out to mine for gold. He agreed to carry along samples of coffee and spices, taking orders from grocery stores along the way. Upon his return to San Francisco in 1865, James became a full partner of The Pioneer Steam Coffee and Spice Mills. In 1872, he bought out the other partners and renamed the company to J.A. Folger & Co.

In 1861, James married, and he and his wife had four children. Two of the children worked for the family business. In 1889, James died, and his oldest son, James A. Folger II, stepped into the role of president of J.A. Folger & Co at the age of 26.

In the 1900s, the company began to grow dramatically due primarily to a salesman named Frank P. Atha. Atha sold coffee in the California area, but proposed to James Folger II that he open and manage a Folgers Coffee plant in Texas. The company grew exponentially after Atha opened the Texas plant.

Under the mid-20th century leadership of Peter Folger, the brand became one of the principal coffee concerns in the world’s largest coffee market: North America. Procter & Gamble (P&G) acquired Folger’s in 1963[3] and removed the apostrophe from its name.[citation needed] During P&G’s ownership, Folgers became the number-one coffee brand in America.

P&G announced in January 2008 Folgers would be spun off into a separate Cincinnati-based company.[4] In June 2008, P&G reversed itself and announced Folgers would be acquired by the end of 2008 by The J.M. Smucker Company.[5][6] Utilizing a rare financial technique called a Reverse Morris Trust, Smucker purchased Folgers in November 2008 and made it a subsidiary.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-08-06T08:14:00+00:00America/New_York08bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 06 Aug 2018 08:14:00 +0000 31, in 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, classic television, nostalgic, vintage tv commercials

 

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 “Mary Wells – Bye Bye Baby” 

 “Mary Wells – Bye Bye Baby” 

“Bye Bye Baby” is the first single by R&B singerMary Wells, released in December 1960 on the Motown label. The song was one of Motown’s earliest hit singles and showcased a much rougher vocal than the singer had during her later years.

History
In 1960, Wells, then 17 years of age, was a nightclub singer who was struggling to make ends meet in Detroit. She aspired to be a songwriter as well, so she wrote a song for fellow Detroiter and R&B singer Jackie Wilson. She saw Berry Gordy while attempting to deliver “Bye Bye, Baby” to Wilson, and asked Gordy to give Wilson her song. But Gordy, having severed ties with Wilson’s manager to form Motown, asked Wells to sing it herself for Motown. Mary recorded “Bye Bye Baby” in her version of Jackie Wilson’s style. Reports claim that the teen had to record the song 26 times or more, before Gordy had a version he approved for release. According to Detroit music mogul Johnnie Mae Matthews, Wells had come to her with four lines of the song, which Matthews said she finished up. When the song was issued, she didn’t get a songwriting credit.[1]

Release and reaction
Released in December 1960, the song became an R&B hit reaching number eight on the Billboard R&B singles chart and crossed over to pop stations where it peaked at number forty-five.[2] It was significant as the first single released under one of the Motown subsidiaries nationally after the label’s first singles were released through distributing labels such as United Artists.

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Posted by on TueAmerica/New_York2018-06-19T15:04:19+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkTue, 19 Jun 2018 15:04:19 +0000 31, in 1960s, 1970s, female vocalists, nostalgic, vintage music

 

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“Big Bopper – Chantilly Lace”

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Jiles Perry “J. P.” Richardson, Jr. (October 24, 1930 – February 3, 1959), commonly known as The Big Bopper, was an American musician, songwriter, and disc jockey, whose big rockabilly look, style, voice, and exuberant personality made him an early rock and roll star. He is best known for his 1958 recording of “Chantilly Lace”.[1]

On February 3, 1959, Richardson died in a plane crash in Clear Lake, Iowa, along with music stars Buddy Holly and Ritchie Valens, and pilot Roger Peterson. That event has become known as “The Day the Music Died” because it is so called in Don McLean’s 1971 song “American Pie”.[2][3]

Biography

J. P. Richardson was born in Sabine Pass, Texas, the oldest son of oil-field worker Jiles Perry Richardson, Sr. and his wife Elise (Stalsby) Richardson. Richardson had two younger brothers, Cecil and James. The family soon moved to Beaumont, Texas. Richardson graduated from Beaumont High School in 1947 and played on the “Royal Purple” football team as a defensive lineman, wearing number 85.[4] Richardson later studied prelaw at Lamar College, and was a member of the band and chorus.

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Posted by on TueAmerica/New_York2018-06-19T13:46:29+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkTue, 19 Jun 2018 13:46:29 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, billboard, classic movies, classic music, guy groups, nostalgic

 

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PLEASANTVILLE AMERICA… Is This Where Peggy Sue Got Married? (travel the unending and recurring roads of Hooterville and Mayberry)

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Many films made during the 1950s and 1960s, are of family values with traditions that reflect a conservative, modest America –no modern complexities.

The most popular genres of those times were Comedy, Western, Romance and Science Fiction. Today’s nostalgic film lovers always want to journey back in time … as real-time. But, they must consider all that it takes to make these imagined journeys through motion picture media real… Filmmakers have become so skilled with interlocking artifacts, great memories, history and imagination.

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Watch “Peggy Sue Got Married – Trailer – Movies TV Network” on YouTube

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-11T19:44:43+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 11 Jun 2018 19:44:43 +0000 31, in 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, nostalgic

 

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“Vintage 1958 Allstate Insurance Animated Commercial”

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Sears Allstate : 1953 | Cartype
cartype.com

History
In 1925, Sears held a national contest to decide the name of a new brand of car tires. After over two million name submissions, “Allstate” was chosen as the winner; the trademark was adopted the very next year. The tires’ success in both the catalog and retail stores prompted Sears Chairman General Robert E. Wood to praise the Allstate tire’s contribution to Sears’ retail store success.[1]

The idea for Allstate Insurance Company came during a bridge game on a commuter train in 1930, when insurance broker Carl L. Odell proposed to Wood, his neighbor, the idea of selling auto insurance by direct mail. The idea appealed to Wood, and he passed the proposal to the Sears board of directors, which approved it. Allstate Insurance Company, named after Sears’ tire brand, went into business on April 17, 1931, offering auto insurance by direct mail and through the Sears catalog.[9] This was in line with one of the objectives of a company to sell automobile insurance in the same manner as Sears sold its merchandise.[10]

Lessing J. Rosenwald was Allstate’s first board chairman, and Odell was named vice president and secretary.[11]

In 1933, at the Century of Progress World’s Fair in Chicago, Allstate’s Richard E. Roskam sold insurance at a booth in the Sears pavilion. In 1934, Allstate opened its first permanent sales office in a Chicago Sears store.[12]

In 1941, only about a quarter of U.S. drivers had auto liability insurance. This led to the state of New York passing a law which established the financial responsibility of drivers for damage or injuries resulting from auto mishaps. That law inspired legislation in other states, and by the mid-1950s nearly every state had some sort of financial responsibility law on its books.[9]

In 1949 the Allstate Headquarters Building was completed at 3245 W. Arthington Street in Chicago.[13] The mid-rise building is currently vacant (as of 2013) and in danger of demolition. The building is noted for its early post-war mid-rise construction. This location was vacated at some point when the company relocated in the post-war years.

The company’s “You’re in Good Hands with Allstate” slogan was created in 1950 by Allstate’s general sales manager Davis W. Ellis. At the end of the decade, it was used in the company’s first network television advertising campaign, which featured actor Ed Reimers.[11]

Allstate added products throughout the 1950s, including fire insurance in 1954 and homeowners and life insurance in 1957. Allstate began selling insurance to Canadians in 1953. Allstate Insurance Company of Canada was incorporated in 1964.[9] (In 1952 and 1953, Sears also sold an automobile called Allstate.)

In 1967, the company’s home office was moved from Skokie to Northbrook, Illinois. Allstate continued to sell additional types of insurance to customers throughout the decade, including worker’s compensation insurance in 1964, surety bonds in 1966, inland-marine coverage in 1967 and a business package policy in 1969.[11]

The brand itself expanded in the 1950s and 1960s and could be found on a variety of products like fire extinguishers and motor scooters. In 1952, an Allstate car was produced, but it was a flop; it was pulled from stores by 1953. The Allstate brand was eventually limited to insurance, tires, and car batteries by the late 1960s before becoming insurance-only in the mid-1970s.[1] In 1991, the company went public[5] before becoming completely independent in 1995.[1]

In 1985, Allstate began to move agents out of Sears stores and locate agents in neighborhood offices. In June 1993, 19.8 percent of Allstate became public through a stock offering. Allstate became completely independent in June 1995, when Sears spun off the remaining 80 percent stake in the company, distributing 350.5 million shares of Allstate stock to its stockholders.[9]

In 1999, Allstate unveiled a new business model that created a single contract for exclusive, independent agents selling Allstate insurance. It also created a network of call centers.

In 1999, Allstate purchased the personal lines division of CNA Financial[14] and subsequently renamed it to Encompass Insurance Company which is written by independent insurance agents, as opposed to the direct writing that constitutes the core part of its business.[15]

In 2003, actor Dennis Haysbert became Allstate’s spokesman, using the tagline “That’s Allstate’s stand.”[16]

In 2010 the actor Dean Winters became a part of Allstate’s campaign “Mayhem” “personifying the pitfalls, like collisions and storm damage, that can befall drivers”.

In 2012 Allstate Solutions Private Limited (also called Allstate India) was inaugurated in Bangalore which is a technology and operations centre to provides software development and business process outsourcing services to its US parent. [17] Allstate’s Bangalore operation is focused on the areas of business intelligence, analytics, testing and mobility.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-11T15:00:19+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 11 Jun 2018 15:00:19 +0000 31, in 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, American Issues, classic television, culture, nostalgic, vintage tv commercials

 

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“THE DOVELLS…”BRISTOL STOMP”……(LYRICS)”

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The Dovells

were an American music group, formed at Overbrook High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1957, under the name ‘The Brooktones’. The members were Arnie Silver, Len Borisoff, Jerry Gross (alias Summers), Mike Freda and Jim Mealey (alias Danny Brooks). Their first single “No, No, No” was a local hit for The Brooktones. Gross left the group in 1959 to form the group The Gems with Mark Stevens, Mike Freda, Warren Purdy, and Roland Scarinci. The remaining Brooktones signed to Parkway Records in 1960 and added Jerry Sirlen and William Shunkwiler to the group, while changing the band’s name to The Dovells. While rehearsing Out In The Cold Again, which turned out to be the B side of Bristol Stomp, Len called Jerry and asked for help with the Harmonies. After 2 days of trying, Len asked Jerry to be part of the group and replace 2 of the guys. Sirlen and Shunkwiler were replaced by Gross and Freda. Mark went on to start his own group Tony & the Raindrops–(Our Love is Over) a local hit, and the later joined The Dovells in the 60s. Warren Purdy went to work for the Boeing Corp., Roland Scarinci enlisted in The Marine Corps then went on to work for AT&T. The Dovells at that point (1961) were – Barry, Gross, Silver, Mealey, & Freda, which went on to record many hit records, starting with the Bristol Stomp. Mealey left the group in ’62 for personal reasons, but still did some recordings with them..

The Dovells first national hit was “

Bristol Stomp

“, a dance song. This was followed by the similar hit “Do the New Continental” (featured in the John Waters movie Hairspray for a minute). “Bristol Stomp” sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[1] They appeared performing both songs in the Chubby Checker movie Don’t Knock The Twist in 1961. They released a series of singles over the next few years. These included “You Can’t Sit Down”, a top hit on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1963. Len left at the end of 1963 for a solo career under the name Len Barry. The high point of his solo career was “1-2-3” in 1965, plus others.

The Dovells released “If You Wanna Be Happy” on the album You Can’t Sit Down in 1963. The song was previously released by Jimmy Soul earlier that year and based on the song “Ugly Woman” by Roaring Lion.

The Dovells continued as a trio, and recorded as The Magistrates for MGM in 1968. As the Magistrates, they recorded the chart hit “Here Comes the Judge,” taking advantage of the popularity of the skit on the TV show Laugh-In. Jerry & Mike wrote and produced the song, added the female voice of Jean Yost(Hillary), and performed as The Magistrates as well as The Dovells. Freda left to do his own thing 1n 1969. The Dovells (Gross-Silver-Stevens) went on to be a big hit, in Las Vegas and the Night Club circuit around the country, doing over 300 shows a year. In 1975, Arnie was tired of being on the road and left the group. Gross and Stevens went on as a duo to great reviews for their music and comedy, and continue to perform to this day. The Dovells have performed 3 times, both for and with President Bill Clinton, a major highlight of their career.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-11T09:16:00+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 11 Jun 2018 09:16:00 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, billboard, classic music, classic television, dance, guy groups, nostalgic

 

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“CARLA THOMAS – GEE WHIZ (LOOK AT HIS EYES)” RARE VIDEO FOOTAGE”

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Carla Venita Thomas (born December 21, 1942, Memphis, Tennessee, United States) is an American singer, who is often referred to as the Queen of Memphis Soul. She is the daughter of Rufus Thomas.

Biography

Thomas was born and raised in the Foote Homes Projects. Along with her siblings, Marvell and Vaneese, she was one of three musical children of Rufus and Lorene Thomas. Despite growing up in the projects, the Thomas family lived near the Palace Theater on Beale Street, as Rufus was the theater’s emcee for their amateur shows.[1] This access not only gave Thomas her first taste of the music world but it also provided a springboard for her transformation into the Queen of the Memphis Sound.

Teen Town Singers
In Memphis, the African American centered WDIA radio station sponsored a rotating musical group of high school students called the Teen Town Singers; notable alumni include Anita Louis and Isaac Hayes. Although the requirements to join the Teen Town Singers stated that the person should be of high school age, Thomas became a member in 1952 at the age of 10. She was able to sneak into their ranks thanks to the fact that her father Rufus was an on-air personality for the radio station. This opportunity with the Teen Town Singers did not come without its drawbacks though. As a 10-year-old student, Thomas was responsible for not only attending classes and completing her schoolwork, but she also had to attend rehearsals on Wednesdays and Fridays after school and then perform at the station on Saturday.[1] However, despite this grueling schedule, Thomas thoroughly enjoyed the experience. According to her, “It was a lot of fun, it really was.”[1] She remained with the Teen Town Singers up until the end of her senior year.[1]

1960s
Although Thomas released albums in the 1990s and in the 2000s, she is best known for the work she completed for both Atlantic Records and most notably, Stax Records in the 1960s. Her first record, “‘Cause I Love You”, was a duet with her father, with brother Marvell on keyboards, that was released by Satellite Records, which eventually became Stax Records. Recorded when Thomas was still attending Hamilton High School in Memphis, the record drew enough local attention to catch the interest of Jerry Wexler of Atlantic Records. He signed a deal with the owners of Satellite Records, Jim Stewart and Estelle Axton, to distribute “Cause I Love You” and thus paved the way for Thomas’ most famous single, “Gee Whiz (Look at His Eyes)”.[2] Her album of duets with Otis Redding, King & Queen was a number 18 hit in the UK Albums Chart.[3]

“Gee Whiz (Look at His Eyes)” Edit
Although this single would eventually chart within the Top 10 on the pop chart and within the Top 5 on the R&B chart, it had an inauspicious beginning. Initially recorded at the Thomas family home, Rufus shopped the song to Vee-Jay Records in Chicago. Vee-Jay never followed through or actively pursued securing the distribution rights. Because of his belief in the song’s potential, Rufus returned to Memphis and in the summer of 1960, Thomas would cut the teen love song that she wrote when she was only 15 years old.[2] The song was released by Rufus and Carla in October, 1960, to not much fanfare.[1] However, by February 1961, the song was being distributed nationally through Atlantic Records just as Thomas was in the midst of her first year at Tennessee A&I University in Nashville. The success of the single also propelled Thomas into the spotlight, as she performed on American Bandstand.[2] According to Thomas, “The record was young-sounding, romantic and it expressed what a lot of people wanted to say at that age, but still, I was surprised at how well it did”.[2] Not only did this song provide a launching pad to Thomas’ first album, but it also gave Stax Records national exposure and label recognition.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-04T12:56:59+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 04 Jun 2018 12:56:59 +0000 31, in 1960s, 1970s, nostalgic

 

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