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 “The Ann Sothern Show” 

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Sitcom
Written by Tom Adair
James B. Allardice
Phil Davis
John Kohn
Terry Ryan
Bob Schiller
Robert Van Scoyck
Marvin Worth
Directed by James V. Kern
Richard Whorf
Starring Ann Sothern
Don Porter
Ann Tyrrell
Jesse White
Jack Mullaney
Ernest Truex
Reta Shaw
Theme music composer Bonnie Lake
Ann Sothern
Opening theme “Katy”
Composer(s) Tom Adair
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 3
No. of episodes 92
Producer(s) Arthur Hoffe
Cinematography Robert Pittack
Running time 24 mins.
Production company(s) Anso Productions
Desilu Productions
Distributor Metromedia Producers Corporation
(original)
CBS Television Distribution (current)
Original network CBS
Picture format Black-and-white
Audio format Monaural
Original release October 6, 1958 – September 25, 1961

The Ann Sothern Show is an American sitcom starring Ann Sothern that aired on CBS for 93 episodes. The series began on October 6, 1958, and ended on September 25, 1961.

The Ann Sothern Show was Sothern’s second sitcom for CBS. Her first series, Private Secretary, ended in 1957 after a contract dispute occurred between Sothern and Secretary’s producer Jack Chertok. Several of Private Secretary’s cast members appeared in the show.

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Synopsis
Katy O’Connor (Sothern) is the assistant manager of the Bartley House, a swank New York City hotel. Katy’s boss, Jason Macauley (Ernest Truex), was a timid, elderly man who was constantly bullied by his overbearing wife, Flora (character actress Reta Shaw). Katy’s secretary, roommate, and best friend Olive was played by Ann Tyrrell, who had also appeared in Sothern’s first series, Private Secretary, in a similar role. Other characters included Johnny Wallace (Jack Mullaney), a bellboy who had a crush on Katy, and Paul Monteney (Jacques Scott), a suave, French room clerk.

After twenty-three episodes, the show was retooled. Katy’s boss, Mr. Macauley was transferred to the Bartley House hotel in Calcutta, along with wife Flora. Don Porter, who had also appeared in Private Secretary as Sothern’s character’s boss, portrayed James Devery, Mr. Macauley’s replacement. Mr. Devery was a younger, somewhat stubborn manager who tended to get carried away with some new, far-fetched idea. After Porter joined the cast, ratings for the series increased.[1] In 1959, the series won a Golden Globe Award for Best TV Show.

In 1960, the series cast was changed again. The characters of Johnny Wallace and Paul Monteney were written out. Three new characters were added; Jesse White, another Private Secretary alum, appeared as Oscar Pudney, a dishonest newsstand owner who was Katy’s nemesis. Child actor Jimmy Fields joined the cast as Richy Gordon, a musical child prodigy whom Katy helped. Dr. Delbert Gray (Louis Nye), a humorous dentist who became Olive’s boyfriend and eventually, her husband was also added along with Ken Berry as Woody the bellboy.

Storylines typically revolve around the personal lives of the staff and guests of the Bartley House. Throughout the three-year run, a storyline of potential romance between Katy and Mr. Devery lingered. In the third season finale episode, Mr. Devery realizes that he is in love with Katy and proposes to her. The episode ending was cliffhanger as Katy kisses Mr. Devery but does not answer his proposal.

The show was somewhat advanced for its time regarding women in the workplace issues. Not only did the single Katy hold a position of authority in the hotel, which made her the supervisor of a host of male employees, but when the character of Dr. Delbert Gray was introduced, so was his mother, who was a practicing dentist and was, like her son, referred to as “Dr. Gray.”

Cast
Ann Sothern as Kathleen “Katy” O’Connor
Ann Tyrrell as Olive Smith
Ernest Truex as Jason McCauley (1958–1959)
Reta Shaw as Flora McCauley (1958–1959)
Don Porter as James Devery (1959–1961)
Jack Mullaney as Johnny Wallace (1958–1960)
Jacques Scott as Paul Monteney (1958–1960)
Jesse White as Oscar Pudney (1960–1961)
Louis Nye as Dr. Delbert Gray (1960–1961)
Jimmy Fields as Richy Gordon (1960–1961)
Ken Berry as Woody Hamilton (1960–1961)

Guest stars
In 1957, after her first television series ended its prime-time run, Ann Sothern guest-starred on the first episode of Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Show, “Lucy Takes a Cruise To Havana”. Sothern appeared as her character from Private Secretary, Susie MacNamara. In the episode, it is explained that Susie met and became friendly with Lucille Ball’s character Lucy MacGillicudy Ricardo, when the two worked as stenographers in New York City. The two later go on a cruise to Cuba together where Lucy meets Ricky Ricardo (Desi Arnaz) and Susie meets Carlos Garcia (Cesar Romero). The episode is one of the earliest examples of a television character “crossing over” from one series to another. Lucille Ball, one of Sothern’s close friends and part owner of Desilu Studios (where The Ann Sothern Show was produced), reciprocated two years later, when she guest starred on a 1959 Ann Sothern episode entitled “The Lucy Story”. This time, Ball’s character (Lucy Ricardo) is an old friend of Katy O’Connor (Sothern), who checks into the Bartley House Hotel after having an argument with Ricky.[2]

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en.m.wikipedia.org

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-08T13:06:26+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 08 Oct 2018 13:06:26 +0000 31, in nostalgic

 

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Have You Ever Wondered When Restaurants and or Fast Foods came to being? And, which came first…?

Have You Ever Wondered When Restaurants and or Fast Foods came to being?  And, which came first…?

The Worthen House, on 141 Worthen Street, Lowell, Massachusetts, is the oldest bar in Lowell, originally built in 1834 as the West India Goods Store. featured image source

Quite assuredly, restaurants and fast foods were born out of the USA’s Industrial Revolution. History tells of a time (Post American Revolution 1780 thru 1860 Civil War antebellum) when the vast enterprising and manufacturing of goods transpired. Factories opened in America’s cities as Lowell Massachusetts and Bothell Washington. Young people went to work in factories; however, after work, they socialized. The intermingling of these newly working-class of young people prompted food concessions to be established. This was the infancy of USA’s industrialization and the dawning of urbanization. This is an AmericaOnCoffee (AOC) Commentary!

The Oldest Restaurants in America

by Amy McKeever

Restaurants aren’t exactly known for long life spans, but every so often one comes along that stands the test of time. There are inns and taverns dotting the East Coast that have been around since — or even before — America itself was founded. But how old is the oldest seafood restaurant or steakhouse? Which of the country’s old-school diners and red-sauce joints are still in operation today? Here’s a look at 11 of the oldest restaurants in America, organized by category:

Oldest Cafe: Café du Monde, New Orleans, LA

Things have been kept pretty simple at the Café du Monde over its 150-year-plus reign. Chicory coffee and square beignets generously dusted with powdered sugar still win the morning, afternoon, and evening at this 24-hour cafe. Café du Monde has been a fixture for life in New Orleans since 1862, having halted operations only temporarily for Hurricane Katrina and other disasters.

800 Decatur St.; 504-525-4544

Oldest Diner: Horseshoe Cafe, Bellingham, WA

It’s been 130 years since the Horseshoe Cafe opened its doors to the miners who had rushed to the doorstep of Bellingham, Washington. Though it’s moved a few times in that long history — and just last year was remodeled and reopened under new ownership — the Horseshoe Cafe has been an all-day Bellingham fixture since 1886. Its menu is stacked with diner staples, from fried chicken and triple-stacked pancakes to burgers and patty melts.

113 E. Holly St.; 360-933-4301

Oldest Burger Joint: Louis’ Lunch, New Haven, CT

There’s some controversy over who gets to claim the oldest burger joint title. The late food writer Josh Ozersky neatly laid out the argument for why a White Castle founder invented the hamburger, but our money falls on Louis’ Lunch for oldest burger joint in America. This New Haven icon has been serving burgers between slices of toast (a disqualifier for some, although buns weren’t even invented at the time) since 1895.

261-263 Crown St.; 203-562-5507

read full article at source

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-08T13:00:46+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 08 Oct 2018 13:00:46 +0000 31, in culture, historic, nostalgic

 

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“Amos ‘n’ Andy Season 1 Full Episode 37 – The Society Party” 

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Hired by CBS as producers of the television show, Gosden and Correll were ready to try bringing the show to television as early as 1946; the search for cast members went on for four years before filming began. According to a 1950 newspaper story, Gosden and Correll had initial aspirations of voicing the characters Amos, Andy and Kingfish for television, while the actors hired for these roles performed and apparently were to lip-sync the story lines.  A year later, both spoke about how they realized they were visually unsuited to play the television roles, citing difficulties with making the Check and Double-Check film. No further mention was made about Gosden and Correll continuing to voice the key male roles in the television series. Corell and Gosden did record the lines of the main male characters to serve as a guideline for the television show dialogue at one point. In 1951, the men targeted 1953 for their retirement from broadcasting; there was speculation that their radio roles might be turned over to black actors at that time.

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Adapted to television, The Amos ‘n Andy Show was produced from June 1951 to April 1953 with 78 filmed episodes, sponsored by the Blatz Brewing Company.[35] The television series used black actors in the main roles, although the actors were instructed to keep their voices and speech patterns close to those of Gosden and Correll.[49] Produced at the Hal Roach Studios for CBS, the show was among the first television series to be filmed with a multicamera setup, four months before I Love Lucy used the technique. The series’ theme song was based on radio show’s “The Perfect Song” but became Gaetano Braga’s “Angel’s Serenade”, performed by The Jeff Alexander Chorus. The program debuted on June 28, 1951.

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The main roles in the television series were played by the following black actors:

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Amos Jones – Alvin Childress

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Andrew Hogg Brown (Andy) – Spencer Williams

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George “Kingfish” Stevens – Tim Moore

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Sapphire Stevens – Ernestine Wade

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Ramona Smith (Sapphire’s Mama) – Amanda Randolph

other casting included:
Madame Queen – Lillian Randolph
Algonquin J. Calhoun – Johnny Lee[53]
Lightnin’ – Nick Stewart (billed as “Nick O’Demus”)
Ruby Jones – Jane Adams

This time, the NAACP mounted a formal protest almost as soon as the television version began,[35] and that pressure was considered a primary factor in the show’s cancellation, even though it finished at #13 in the 1951-1952 season in the Nielsen ratings and at #25 in 1952-1953 (the sponsor, Blatz Beer, was targeted as well, finally discontinuing their advertising support in June 1953). It has been suggested that CBS erred in premiering the show at the same time as the 1951 NAACP national convention, perhaps increasing the objections to it. The show was widely repeated in syndicated reruns until 1966 when, in an unprecedented action for network television at that time, CBS finally gave in to pressure from the NAACP and the growing civil rights movement and withdrew the program, being also pulled from Australian network ABC, which had been broadcasting it for almost a decade. The series would not be seen on American television regularly for 46 more years.The television show has been available in bootleg VHS and DVD sets, which generally include 72 of the 78 known TV episodes.

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When the show was cancelled, 65 episodes had been produced. An additional 13 episodes were produced to be added to the syndicated rerun package. These episodes were focused on Kingfish, with little participation from Amos ‘n’ Andy.

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This is because these episodes were to be titled The Adventures of Kingfish, but they premiered under the Amos ‘n’ Andy title instead.[59] The additional episodes first aired on CBS on January 4, 1955.[60] Plans were made for a vaudeville act of the television program in August 1953, with Tim Moore, Alvin Childress and Spencer Williams playing the same roles. It is not known whether there were any performances.[61] Still eager for television success, Gosden, Correll and CBS made initial efforts to give the series another try. The plan was to begin televising Amos ‘n’ Andy in the fall of 1956, with both of its creators appearing on television in a split screen with the proposed black cast.[62]

A group of cast members began a “TV Stars of Amos ‘n’ Andy” cross-country tour in 1956, which was halted by CBS; the network considered it an infringement of their exclusive rights to the show and its characters.[49] Following the threatened legal action that brought the 1956 tour to an end, Moore, Childress, Williams and Lee were able to perform in character for at least one night in 1957 in Windsor, Ontario.[63]

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 “Amos n Andy 54 The Eyeglasses”

“Amos n Andy 31 Insurance Policy” 

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-08T12:45:18+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 08 Oct 2018 12:45:18 +0000 31, in classic television, comedy, nostalgic

 

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Trulove Stories – A Reflection Of American, Romantic Wonders

The 1920’s was the decade of all things NEW — a new kind of economy, fashion, thinking and a new modern woman. Gone were the corsets, elaborate long hair, layers of petticoats, as well as Victorian morality. You were “not what grandma used to be. Oh contraire!” You worked, made your own money and had your own place. You were emboldened by the right to vote. Some say you pushed the boundaries too far — smoking, drinking, showing your knees, carousing at speakeasies. No longer tied to tradition, you redefined what it meant to be a lady. It was the perfect time to be young and thin (isn’t it always?) and still pretty heady even if you weren‘t. As a woman you now had freedom to choose. Who would you vote for? What career would you pursue? How would you dress? And most importantly, should you cut your hair? Read More

(Excerpts)

The women of the ‘30s proved it, even if the men weren’t ready to admit it. Despite everything that was going on, you saw to it that the deep desire — truly the need — for laughter, love, friendship, passion and fun prevailed. Read More

That Crazy Girl

that crazy girlLove is so beautiful—so terrible—so awesome a thing. It came to her like a tropical dawn—in a matchless sweep of breathless beauty and wonder, yet. . .

Love is so beautiful—so terrible—so awesome a thing. It came to her like a tropical dawn—in a matchless sweep of breathless beauty and wonder, yet. . .
Love is so beautiful—so terrible—so awesome a thing. It came to her like a tropical dawn—in a matchless sweep of breathless beauty and wonder, yet. . .

Dateline: April 1937

Hear The Audio Version of This Story!

They were falling deeply in love, but she held a secret: Myra was the cause of all his bitterness. She caused his plane to crash during the town air-derby, forever Read More


Life in the 40s

Chic and appropriately dressed for every occasion, the women of the 1940s were sassy, strong and adaptable. Think Katherine Hepburn! World War II created extraordinary circumstances, requiring exceptional women, and you didn’t disappoint. As men were shipped overseas, you took up their power tools (you knew how to operate an electric mixer after all!) and places at the assembly lines building ships and armaments. You succeeded at jobs no one ever dreamed a woman could do. Singles, married women, even mothers with small children, worked outside the home – to do so was patriotic. As food, gasoline and clothing were rationed, you organized the pantry, carefully planned meals and started sewing the family clothes. Uncle Sam needed you and you would do whatever he asked! Read More


Life in the 50s

Women faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read MoreWomen faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read MoreWomen faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read MoreWomen faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read More

Women faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read MoreWomen faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read MoreWomen faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read MoreWomen faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read MoreWomen faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read MoreWomen faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read MoreWomen faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read MoreWomen faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read More

Women faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read MoreWomen faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read More
Women faced many challenges in the 1950s. True, there was the comfort and stability that comes from peace, a booming economy, a happy marriage and a house full of children. Yet, there were so many contradictory messages. Happiness was supposed to come from being a homemaker – a wife, a mother, yet being a “career girl” was gaining popularity. Read More

Hold on to your seats, the 1960s were a wild ride! We eased into the decade gently, confident that conservative values, traditional roles, and classic clothes still prevailed. We were an affluent society, enjoying the fruits of a flourishing economy. Yet our new young president, John Kennedy, urged us to embrace self-sacrifice over selfishness, to work together to eliminate injustice and inequality. He set the tone for change, but no one was prepared for the social upheaval that would ensue. Read More


Life in the 60s

Hold on to your seats, the 1960s were a wild ride! We eased into the decade gently, confident that conservative values, traditional roles, and classic clothes still prevailed. We were an affluent society, enjoying the fruits of a flourishing economy. Yet our new young president, John Kennedy, urged us to embrace self-sacrifice over selfishness, to work together to eliminate injustice and inequality. He set the tone for change, but no one was prepared for the social upheaval that would ensue. Read More

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-08T11:45:53+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 08 Oct 2018 11:45:53 +0000 31, in culture, nostalgic

 

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“Cabin in the Sky (1943)” 

Cabin in the Sky is a 1943 American musical film based on the 1940 stage musical of the same name. Directed by Vincente Minnelli, the film stars Ethel Waters and Rex Ingram, who reprised their roles from the Broadway production, as well Eddie ‘Rochester’ Anderson and Lena Horne. It was Horne’s first and only leading role in an MGM musical. Louis Armstrong was also featured in the film as one of Lucifer Junior’s minions, and Duke Ellington and his Orchestra have a showcase musical number in the film.

Plot summary

Little Joe, a man killed over gambling debts, is restored to life by angelic powers and given six months to redeem his soul and become worthy of entering Heaven—otherwise he will be condemned to Hell. Secretly guided by “The General” (the Lord’s Angel), Little Joe gives up his shiftless ways and becomes a hardworking, generous, and loving husband to his wife Petunia, whom he had previously neglected. Unfortunately, demon Lucifer Jr. (the son of Satan himself), is determined to drag Little Joe to Hell. Lucifer arranges for Joe to become wealthy by winning a lottery, reintroduces Joe to beautiful gold-digger Georgia Brown, and manipulates marital discord between Joe and Petunia. Little Joe abandons his wife for Georgia, and the two embark on a life of hedonistic pleasure. As Little Joe and Georgia celebrate at a nightclub one evening, Petunia joins them, determined to win Joe back. Little Joe fights with Domino for Petunia and she prays for God to destroy the nightclub. A cyclone appears and leaves the nightclub in ruins, as Joe and Petunia lie dead in the ruins after being shot by Domino. Just as it appears that Joe’s soul is lost forever, the angelic General informs him that Georgia Brown was so affected by the tragedy that she has donated all the money that he had given her to the church. On this technicality, Little Joe is allowed to go to Heaven with Petunia. As the two climb the Celestial Stairs, Joe suddenly wakes in his own bed. Joe had not been killed in the initial gambling-debt fracas, only wounded. All his supposed dealings with angels and demons were only a fever dream. Now genuinely reformed, Little Joe begins a new, happy life with his loving Petunia.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-08T11:10:21+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 08 Oct 2018 11:10:21 +0000 31, in classic film star, classic movies, nostalgic

 

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Johnny Otis! Johnny Otis!

Many old timers remember the Johnny Otis Show back in the mid to late 1950s. The show opened with the Johnny Otis Band rolling drum sounds and the MC would sing: “Johnny Otis! Johnny Otis!”

On his show, Otis showcased and paved the way for many talented Black Jazz, R&B singers, including the unforgettable BoDiddley.

~AmericaOnCoffee~

Otis was born in Vallejo, California, to Greek immigrant parents, Alexander J. Veliotes, a Mare Island longshoreman and grocery store owner, and his wife, the former Irene Kiskakes, a painter. He had a younger sister, Dorothy, and a younger brother, Nicholas A. Veliotes, who became the U.S. Ambassador to Jordan(1978–1981) and Egypt (1984–1986). Johnny grew up in a predominantly black neighborhood in Berkeley, California, where his father owned a grocery store. He became known for his choice to live his professional and personal life as a member of the African-American community. He wrote, “As a kid I decided that if our society dictated that one had to be black or white, I would be black.”

On May 2, 1941, when Otis was 19, he married Phyllis Walker, an 18-year old woman of African American and Filipino descent from Oakland, whom he had known since childhood. Despite deep and enduring objections from his mother, the young couple left California and eloped in Reno, Nevada, where interracial marriage was accepted at the time. They had four children: Shuggie Otis and Nicholas Otis, both of whom became musicians, and two daughters, Janice and Laura. Johnny and Phyllis also raised Lucky Otis, Shuggie’s son with his first wife, Miss Mercy Fontenot of The GTOs.

Johnny Otis (born Ioannis Alexandres Veliotes; December 28, 1921 – January 17, 2012) was an American singer, musician, composer, arranger, bandleader, talent scout, disc jockey, record producer, television show host, artist, author, journalist, minister, and impresario.

He was a seminal influence on American R&B and rock and roll. He discovered numerous artists early in their careers who went on to become highly successful in their own right, including Little Esther Phillips, Etta James, Big Mama Thornton, Johnny Ace, Jackie Wilson, Little Willie John, Hank Ballard, and The Robins(who eventually changed their name to The Coasters), among many others. Otis has become widely synonymous with being known as the original “King of Rock and Roll”[citation needed] and the “Godfather of Rhythm and Blues”.

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-01T17:00:42+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 01 Oct 2018 17:00:42 +0000 31, in 1950s, 1960s, classic music, personality

 

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Hunter Hancock D.J. – he set the standards for all “wanna be” DJays

Hunter Hancock was one of America’s pioneering D.J.s during the most prominent segregation and racial times in America’s history. His love of music and artists with his charisma connected him to a wide audience in Black entertainment. During the Watts Riot, Hunter was a top D.J. at a popular Black Los Angeles California radio station, KGFJ.

~an AmericaOnCoffee Commentary~

More On this legendary D.J.

Hunter Hancock was a white American disc jockey regarded as the first in the Western United States to play rhythm and blues records on the radio, and among the first to broadcast rock and roll.

He was born in Uvalde, Texas, and raised 90 miles (140 km) away in San Antonio. After school, he took on many jobs, including singing in a vaudeville troupe and a stint at a Massachusetts burlesque club. After moving to Los Angeles in the early 1940s he entered radio and was heard on the following stations there: KFVD (1947–1951), KFOX (1951–1954), KFVD/KPOP (1954–1957) and KGFJ(1957–1966).[1] Inspired by local black record store owner John Dolphin of Dolphin’s Of Hollywood record shop he called himself “Ol’ H.H.” He hosted several shows on different stations, often at the same time, including Harlem Holiday, Harlematinee, Huntin’ With Hunter and the gospel show Songs of Soul and Spirit.

Hancock also appeared briefly on the L.A. CBS TV station, KNXT in 1955 with the Friday night show “Rhythm and Bluesville”, interviewing such musicians as Duke Ellington, Fats Domino, Little Richard, Gene & Eunice and The Platters.

For several years, the Pulse survey rated Hancock’s shows No. 1 among black listeners in Southern California. In 1950, the Los Angeles Sentinel newspaper rated Hancock the most popular DJ in Los Angeles among blacks. He was also one of the first DJs to play rock and roll music, and landed a cameo spot in a 1957 British rock and roll film called Rock Around the World.

A recreated example of Mr. Hancock’s program on Los Angeles’ former R&B radio station KGFJ can be found on Ron Jacobs’ “Cruisin’ 1959” (Increase Records INCR 5-2004). This recreation includes several classic R&B songs of that era, contemporary commercials (e.g., Champion spark plugs, the Saturday Evening Post, and others), and DJ patter.

Hancock died August 4, 2004, of natural causes in a retirement home in Claremont, California.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-01T16:00:22+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 01 Oct 2018 16:00:22 +0000 31, in historic, nostalgic, personality, pop music

 

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