RSS

Category Archives: nostalgic

THE ORIGIN OF BARBEQUE


I am offering you three versions  now of the origin:

Here is The First Version:

First of all,  the word barbeque  is misused.  When you  cook steaks, hot dogs and hamburgers (and whatever else you want) on the grill, well hello…..guess what? That is called Grilling!

Cooking meat over an open fire has been around since the cave man. But the cave man didn’t BBQ. Why? Because he had no sauce. LOL! Actually, as far as we know, the cave men just grilled over an open fire.

So just what is barbequing?  Now pay attention. It will probably end up being a question on “Jeopardy” someday! <wink>  

To barbeque (going to use BBQ from now on since it’s so hard to type) is slow-cooking meat at a low temperature for a long time over wood or charcoal.  Not gas!  Although, most of us without a discerning culinary palette (like me) don’t know the difference.

BBQ began in the late 1800’s during cattle drives out West.  The men had to be fed (cowboys) and the boss (cattle baron) didn’t want to feed them the good meat. So, other disposable cuts were used to feed the men. The main choice for this was Brisket, which is a very tough, stringy piece of meat.  However, the cowboys learnt that if you left this brisket to cook for a long period of time (5-7 hours) at approximately 200 degrees (although I don’t know how they  knew the temperature over a fire?) that wha-la!  A super yummie meal was to be had.  Besides Brisket,  other meats that they found to BBQ well, were pork butt, pork ribs, beef ribs, venison and goat.

The basic BBQ grill is a cooking chamber with an offset firebox or a water smoker.  The average Kmart gas grill is not for BBQ, but for grilling.  Today BBQ is a hobby — or passion with some — and enjoyed by millions of Americans each year.   I guess it’s one of the things we as Americans can claim as “authentic” and part of our culture and not a cooking style that has been brought from another country.


To BBQ is to truly cook American (although its original origin debatable and argued to not come from America at all.)

You know what they say? “When in Rome…do as the Romans.” This can apply to BBQ also.  Different areas of the country have different meat priorities and preparations.  For example, in the Southeast, pork is the preferred meat to BBQ.  Digging a pit (to concentrate cooking heat and smoke) goes back to European culture. Then it was forgotten until the Jamestown colonists arrived.  Since pigs were running around freely to fatten themselves up, (only to be captured and eaten later) pork became the sustenance meat of Virginia and later the southern states.  This also was a blessing when crops didn’t produce as they should for whatever reasons.

Texas seems to love beef barbeque, which seems logical due to all the cattle in the region.

And, it’s my own personal experience that the West coast, especially Californians, seem to love chicken or seafood to BBQ.  When I lived in California, I know the popular beach BBQ was to let swordfish marinate in a dish filled with a teriyaki mixture overnight and then BBQ the next day.  In Santa Barbara, on the 4th of July, it’s a traditional custom to go dig a pit on the beach to party in and BBQ in.

Below I have some traditional BBQ recipes.  But, the sauce is what seems to define a BBQ chef or restaurant.  In the South they seem to like thinner BBQ sauces, with a more vinegary tone.  Other parts of the US prefer the thick, sweet, tomato BBQ sauce.  But in Texas they season their beef with a dry-rub mixture of seasonings.

There are even quirky BBQ’s in some restaurants or areas of the United States.  In the early 1900’s, New Yorkers loved turtle BBQ. I think that got replaced by New York pizza or cheesecake?  I recall vacationing in Wyoming a few years back and coming across a restaurant that offered BBQ Buffalo meat.  (BTW I tried it and it was delicious!)

There is also some argument that clambakes are nothing but a spin-off of traditional BBQs because they are cooked in a pit.  Others claim that the BBQ idea evolved from the fisherman’s clambakes. So which came first, the BBQ or the clambake?  

It’s undeniable that BBQ is popular and well-loved in American society. But, BBQ tastes and cooking differ.  Real BBQ purists claim that a restaurant that offers its customers a grilled piece of meat slapped with some sauce later isn’t eating real BBQ at all.  Others say it is, as long as the sauce is there, then it’s BBQ!

Every year the Kansas City Barbecue Society (KCBS) sponsors barbecue competitions all over the US. The biggest one of all is the American Royal (sounds like a rodeo huh?) held every October at guess where? Yup, Kansas City.   I’ve never attended, but rumor has it that you can’t find a steak, hot dog or hamburger there. Nope, it’s nothing but real cuts of meat. And, I will assume shrimp, buffalo, turtle, snake, venison, elk, etc?

(Information  source for the above information on BBQ  is from  posts I read on the American Cooking Bulletin Board and my own personal experiences.)

Read The Second and Third Versions

https://www.brownielocks.com/bbq.html

Advertisements
 
2 Comments

Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-07-02T10:50:00+00:00America/New_York07bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 02 Jul 2018 10:50:00 +0000 31, in historic, nostalgic

 

Tags:

“Chris Kenner -The Name Of The Place is, I Like It Like That, Parts 1 & 2 (1961)”

image

Chris Kenner (December 25, 1929 – January 25, 1976) was a New Orleans R&B singer and songwriter, best known for two hit singles in the early 1960s that became staples in the repertoires of many other musicians.

Biography

Born in the farming community of Kenner, Louisiana, upriver from New Orleans, Kenner sang gospel music with his church choir. He moved to New Orleans when he was in his teens. In 1955 he made his first recordings, for a small label, Baton Records, without success. In 1957 recorded his “Sick and Tired” for Imperial Records; Fats Domino covered it the next year, and his version became a hit. “Rocket to the Moon” and “Life Is Just a Struggle”, both cut for Ron Records, were other notable songs Kenner recorded in this period.

Moving to another New Orleans label, Instant, he began to work with pianist and arranger Allen Toussaint. In 1961, this collaboration produced “I Like It Like That”, his first and biggest hit, peaking at #2 in the Billboard Hot 100 chart (covered in 1965 by the Dave Clark Five), and “Something You Got” (covered by Wilson Pickett, Alvin Robinson, the Ramsey Lewis Trio, Chuck Jackson, Earl Grant, Maxine Brown, Bobby Womack, the Moody Blues (on their 1965 debut album), the American Breed, Fairport Convention and Bruce Springsteen). “I Like It Like That” sold over one million copies and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA.[1] In 1962 he produced his most enduring song, “Land of a Thousand Dances”, which was covered by various artists, including Cannibal & the Headhunters, Thee Midniters, Wilson Pickett, the Action, and Patti Smith.

Kenner continued to record for Instant and for other small local labels, including many of his lesser-known songs from the 1960s, such as “My Wife”, “Packing Up” and “They Took My Money”. He released an album, Land of a Thousand Dances, on Atlantic Records in 1966; the Collectors’ Choice label reissued it on CD in 2007.

In 1968 Kenner was convicted of statutory rape of a minor and spent three years in Louisiana’s Angola prison.

Kenner died from a heart attack in 1976, at the age of 46.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
1 Comment

Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-07-02T10:48:00+00:00America/New_York07bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 02 Jul 2018 10:48:00 +0000 31, in 1960s, billboard, nostalgic, vintage music

 

Tags:

“P.S. I LOVE YOU – 1963”

image

The Classics were an American vocal group formed in 1958 in Brooklyn.

The Classics first sang together in high school; two of them had previously sung in a group called The Del-Rays. In 1959, under the auspices of manager Jim Gribble, they recorded their first single, “Cinderella”; the record Bubbled Under the US Hot 100 in early 1960. The follow-up, “Angel Angela”, also narrowly missed the national charts, and the 1961 single “Life Is But a Dream” hit the lower regions of the Black Singles chart when Mercury Records picked it up for national distribution, but it wasn’t until they released the single “Blue Moon” with Herb Lance on lead vocals that they charted a hit. The song peaked at #50.

The group signed with Musicnote Records in 1963 and released “Till Then”, which became their biggest hit, peaking at #20 on the pop charts and #7 AC.

The group was best remembered for its ballads, and frequently sang versions of pop standards from the 1920s and 1930s. They frequently changed labels over the course of their career, and parted ways about 1966. Member Emil Stucchio revived the name to tour in the 1970s and again in the 1990s and 2000s.In the 1990s, the group was Stuccio, former Mystic Al Contrera, Scott LaChance, and Michael Paquette.Later it was Stuccio, Contrera, LaChance, and Teresa McClean. LaChance later left the group.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-07-02T10:11:00+00:00America/New_York07bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 02 Jul 2018 10:11:00 +0000 31, in 1960s, classic television

 

Tags:

“Shirley Bassey “Goldfinger” – Live at Royal Albert Hall, 1974.”

image

“Goldfinger” was the title song from the 1964 James Bond film Goldfinger. Composed by John Barry and with lyrics by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley, the song was performed by Shirley Bassey for the film’s opening and closing title sequences, as well as the soundtrack album release. The single release of the song gave Bassey her only Billboard Hot 100 top forty hit, peaking in the Top 10 at number eight and at number two for four weeks on the Adult Contemporary chart,[1] and in the United Kingdom the single reached number 21.[2]

The song finished at #53 in AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema. In 2008, the single was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.[3]

Background

Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley were asked to create the lyrics for the song. But when its composer John Barry played them the first three notes, Bricusse and Newley looked at each other and sang out: “. . . wider than a mile,” to the melody of “Moon River,” the popular theme song from Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Barry was not amused.

One source of inspiration was the song “Mack the Knife”, which director Guy Hamilton showed Barry, thinking it was a “gritty and rough” song that could be a good model for what the film required. Bricusse and Newley were not shown any film footage or script excerpts, but were advised of the fatal gilding suffered by the Jill Masterson character, played by Shirley Eaton. Bricusse would later recall that once he and Newley hit upon utilizing “the Midas touch” in the lyric, the pattern of the song became evident and the lyrics were completed within at most a couple of days.

The first recording of “Goldfinger” was made by Newley in a May 14, 1964 recording session, with Barry as conductor, which produced two completed takes. Barry would recall that Newley gave a “very creepy” performance which he, Barry considered “terrific”. Newley’s recording, however, was made purely as a demo for the film’s makers. According to Barry, Newley “didn’t want to sing it in the movie as they [Newley and Bricusse] thought the song was a bit weird”.

Shirley Bassey was Barry’s choice to record the song; he had been conductor on Bassey’s national tour in December 1963 and the two had also been romantically involved. Barry had played Bassey an instrumental track of the song before its lyrics were written; the singer would recall that hearing the track had given her “goose bumps”. She agreed to sing the song whatever the lyrics might eventually be. Bassey recorded the track on August 20, 1964 at London’s CTS Studios in Wembley: the track’s producer credit named Bassey’s regular producer George Martin, but the session was in fact overseen by Barry. Vic Flick, Jimmy Page and Big Jim Sullivan are all said to have been guitarists on the session, and at least Page has supported his involvement, recalling that Bassey had nearly collapsed after the final note.

The recording of “Goldfinger” lasted all night as Barry demanded repeated takes due to musicians’ or technical glitches, not any shortcomings in Bassey’s vocal. Bassey did initially have issues with the climactic final note which necessitated her slipping behind a studio partition between takes to remove her bra. Bassey would recall of the final note: “I was holding it and holding it – I was looking at John Barry and I was going blue in the face and he’s going – hold it just one more second. When it finished, I nearly passed out.”

The iconic two-note phrase which is the basis for the song’s introduction was not in the original orchestration, but occurred to Barry during a tea-break, following an hour and a half of rehearsal. By the time the musicians returned, twenty minutes later, he had written the figure into the orchestration.

The hit single was released in mono, with the album stereo issues (on the film soundtrack, Golden Hits Of Shirley Bassey and subsequent releases) using an alternate mix in which the instrumental take is the same, but Bassey’s vocal is different; a shade less intense and with a shorter final note. Newley’s version was later released in 1992 to mark the 30th Anniversary of James Bond on film, in a compilation collector’s edition: The Best of Bond…James Bond.

Bassey’s title theme was almost taken out of the film because producer Harry Saltzman hated it, saying, “That’s the worst *** song I’ve ever heard in my *** life”. Saltzman would also dislike Bassey’s subsequent Bond theme, that for Diamonds Are Forever. However time constraints did not allow for the possibility of a replacement Goldfinger theme song being written and recorded.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
4 Comments

Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-07-02T09:36:00+00:00America/New_York07bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 02 Jul 2018 09:36:00 +0000 31, in 1960s, classic music, culture, female vocalists, movie stars, nostalgic, vintage advertisement, vintage tv commercials, vintage tv shows

 

Tags: ,

BANANA SPLIT PIE  

By Nellie

Nothing says summer like banana splits, and this version will not disappoint! This pie only takes a few minutes to prepare and will stay ready in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours before serving so you can prepare it in advance. You can also customize this dessert and add nuts and/or any other toppings you’d like – my kids had a lot of fun helping me make this fun and easy treat!

BANANA SPLIT PIE

  • 1 graham cracker crust
  • 8 oz. pkg cream cheese, softened
  • 2 cups powdered sugar
  • 4 bananas, sliced
  • 12 oz. can crushed pineapple, well drained
  • 8 oz. container Cool Whip
  • 10-15 maraschino cherries, dried on paper towels
  • chocolate syrup, optional

Use an electric mixer to blend cream cheese and powdered sugar until smooth. Spread on top of the crust. Slice bananas and place on the cream cheese layer. Top the bananas with the crushed pineapple. Spread Cool Whip on top of the pineapple and top with maraschino cherries and chocolate syrup. Keep in the refrigerator until ready to serve. Enjoy!

source

 
2 Comments

Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-25T16:36:27+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 25 Jun 2018 16:36:27 +0000 31, in dessert, nostalgic

 

Tags:

“Thrillist:  Lynden’s Soda Fountain revisited – Minneapolis, MN”  

image source

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-25T15:30:54+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 25 Jun 2018 15:30:54 +0000 31, in nostalgic

 

Tags: , ,

Flower Drum Song, a 1961 Musical Stage play and film adaption

Music Richard Rodgers
Lyrics Oscar Hammerstein II
Book
Oscar Hammerstein II
Joseph Fields
David Henry Hwang (2002 Revised Version)
Basis Novel by C. Y. Lee
Productions
1958 Broadway
1960 West End
2002 Broadway revival
Flower Drum Song was the eighth musical by the team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. It was based on the 1957 novel, The Flower Drum Song, by Chinese-American author C. Y. Lee. The piece opened in 1958 on Broadway and was afterwards presented in the West End and on tour. It was subsequently made into a 1961 musical film.

After their extraordinary early successes, beginning with Oklahoma! in 1943, Rodgers and Hammerstein had written two musicals in the 1950s that did not do well and sought a new hit to revive their fortunes. Lee’s novel focuses on a father, Wang Chi-yang, a wealthy refugee from China, who clings to traditional values in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Rodgers and Hammerstein shifted the focus of the musical to his son, Wang Ta, who is torn between his Chinese roots and assimilation into American culture. The team hired Gene Kelly to make his debut as a stage director with the musical and scoured the country for a suitable Asian – or at least, plausibly Asian-looking – cast. The musical, much more light-hearted than Lee’s novel, was profitable on Broadway and was followed by a national tour.

After the release of the 1961 film version, the musical was rarely produced, as it presented casting issues and fears that Asian-Americans would take offense at how they are portrayed. When it was put on the stage, lines and songs that might be offensive were often cut. The piece did not return to Broadway until 2002, when a version with a plot by playwright David Henry Hwang (but retaining most of the original songs) was presented after a successful Los Angeles run. Hwang’s story retains the Chinatown setting and the inter-generational and immigrant themes, and emphasizes the romantic relationships. It received mostly poor reviews in New York and closed after six months but had a short tour and has since been produced regionally.

Henry Koster
Produced by Ross Hunter
Screenplay by Joseph Fields
Based on Flower Drum Song
by Oscar Hammerstein II
Joseph Fields
Starring Nancy Kwan
James Shigeta
Miyoshi Umeki
Jack Soo
Benson Fong
Juanita Hall
Music by Richard Rodgers
Cinematography Russell Metty
Edited by Milton Carruth
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release dates
November 9, 1961
Running time
132 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Cantonese
Budget $4 million[1]
Box office $5 million (US/ Canada rentals) [2]
Flower Drum Song is a 1961 film adaptation of the 1958 Broadway musical Flower Drum Song, written by the composer Richard Rodgers and the lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II. The film and stage play were based on the 1957 novel of the same name by the Chinese American author C. Y. Lee.

In 2008, Flower Drum Song was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Plot

A young woman named Mei Li arrives from China as an illegal immigrant with her father in San Francisco, California to enter into an arranged marriage with the owner of a night club, Sammy Fong (inspired by the actual Forbidden City nightclub). Her intended is already involved with his leading showgirl, Linda Low, and does his best to dissuade Mei Li from marrying him, sending her to live in the house of Master Wang, where he presents her as prospect for Master Wang’s son, Wang Ta. Dissolving the marriage contract is harder than either of them imagine. Master Wang is persuaded by his sister-in-law, Madame Liang, to allow Mei Li to fall in love naturally with Master Wang’s son, Wang Ta. But Wang Ta is dazzled by the charms of Linda, who ‘enjoys being a girl’, and succeeds in landing a date with her, during which she convinces him to give her his fraternity pin (it symbolizes that they’re “going steady”). Linda wishes to use Wang Ta to get a real commitment from Sammy Fong, who gets wind of her plan when Linda attends a party in honor of Wang Ta’s and Madame Liang’s graduation from university and citizenship classes, respectively. At the party, Linda has another club employee pretend to be her brother, and grant his permission for Linda to marry Wang Ta. Mei Li, hearing this, becomes discouraged, while Ta and his father argue over his marriage plans. Ta argues that he is old enough to make his own decisions, but the father says that he will be the one to let Ta know when he is old enough.

Sammy, in an effort to keep Linda from marrying Wang Ta, arranges to have Wang Ta (and his family) see her nightclub act, where he is shocked at her performance. He leaves, distraught, accompanied by his friend since childhood, the seamstress Helen Chao, who also grew up in America and deeply loves Wang Ta. Ta becomes drunk in his misery over Linda, and Helen ends up letting him stay for the night in her apartment. She sings “Love Look Away”, about her unrequited love. In the morning, Mei Li comes to deliver a burned coat for Helen to mend, and becomes distressed when she discovers Wang Ta’s clothing in Helen’s kitchen. When Wang Ta wakes up (seconds after Mei Li leaves), he still does not notice Helen’s affections, even as she pleads for him to stay, and he leaves quickly. He goes to speak with Mei Li, now realizing that she is a better match for him than Linda Low, only to have Mei Li reject him, saying that she once loved him, but not anymore. She and her father leave Master Wang’s house and pursue the marriage contract between Mei Li and Sammy Fong. This is unfortunate in that Sammy has already proposed to Linda, but now will be unable to marry her (the contract is binding). Before the wedding, Wang Ta goes to see Mei Li, and they both realize that they are deeply in love with one another. They agree to try to come up with a way to get Mei Li out of her marriage contract.

The day of the wedding, right before she is to sip from a goblet (which would seal her marriage to Sammy), Mei Li declares that, because she entered the United States illegally, the contract is null and void. Wang Ta can thus marry Mei Li, and Sammy decides to marry Linda right there as well, resulting in a double wedding. Helen ends up empty handed (in fact, she does not appear again after Wang Ta leaves her apartment). In the novel, Ta’s rejection actually leads her to commit suicide.

en.m.wikipedia.org

Red

Flowerdrum

Movie

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-06-25T14:32:01+00:00America/New_York06bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 25 Jun 2018 14:32:01 +0000 31, in classic film star, classic movies, nostalgic

 

Tags: ,

 
%d bloggers like this: