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Category Archives: nostalgic

Hunter Hancock D.J. – he set the standards for all “wanna be” DJays

Hunter Hancock was one of America’s pioneering D.J.s during the most prominent segregation and racial times in America’s history. His love of music and artists with his charisma connected him to a wide audience in Black entertainment. During the Watts Riot, Hunter was a top D.J. at a popular Black Los Angeles California radio station, KGFJ.

~an AmericaOnCoffee Commentary~

More On this legendary D.J.

Hunter Hancock was a white American disc jockey regarded as the first in the Western United States to play rhythm and blues records on the radio, and among the first to broadcast rock and roll.

He was born in Uvalde, Texas, and raised 90 miles (140 km) away in San Antonio. After school, he took on many jobs, including singing in a vaudeville troupe and a stint at a Massachusetts burlesque club. After moving to Los Angeles in the early 1940s he entered radio and was heard on the following stations there: KFVD (1947–1951), KFOX (1951–1954), KFVD/KPOP (1954–1957) and KGFJ(1957–1966).[1] Inspired by local black record store owner John Dolphin of Dolphin’s Of Hollywood record shop he called himself “Ol’ H.H.” He hosted several shows on different stations, often at the same time, including Harlem Holiday, Harlematinee, Huntin’ With Hunter and the gospel show Songs of Soul and Spirit.

Hancock also appeared briefly on the L.A. CBS TV station, KNXT in 1955 with the Friday night show “Rhythm and Bluesville”, interviewing such musicians as Duke Ellington, Fats Domino, Little Richard, Gene & Eunice and The Platters.

For several years, the Pulse survey rated Hancock’s shows No. 1 among black listeners in Southern California. In 1950, the Los Angeles Sentinel newspaper rated Hancock the most popular DJ in Los Angeles among blacks. He was also one of the first DJs to play rock and roll music, and landed a cameo spot in a 1957 British rock and roll film called Rock Around the World.

A recreated example of Mr. Hancock’s program on Los Angeles’ former R&B radio station KGFJ can be found on Ron Jacobs’ “Cruisin’ 1959” (Increase Records INCR 5-2004). This recreation includes several classic R&B songs of that era, contemporary commercials (e.g., Champion spark plugs, the Saturday Evening Post, and others), and DJ patter.

Hancock died August 4, 2004, of natural causes in a retirement home in Claremont, California.

source

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-01T16:00:22+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 01 Oct 2018 16:00:22 +0000 31, in historic, nostalgic, personality, pop music

 

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Eggnog Cream Puffs

Eggnog Cream Puffs Recipe

photo by Taste of Home

Total Time
Prep: 40 min. Bake: 30 min. + cooling

Makes
about 2 dozen
Ingredients
1 cup water
1/2 cup butter, cubed
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
4 large Nellie’s Free Range Eggs

WHIPPED CREAM:
1-1/2 cups heavy whipping cream
1-1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar
1/4 cup eggnog
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
Additional confectioners’ sugar

Directions
Preheat oven to 400°. In a large saucepan, bring water, butter and salt to a rolling boil. Add flour all at once and nutmeg and stir until blended. Cook over medium heat, stirring vigorously until mixture pulls away from sides of pan. Remove from heat; let stand 5 minutes.
Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition until smooth. Continue beating until mixture is smooth and shiny. Drop dough by rounded tablespoonfuls 1 in. apart onto greased baking sheets. Bake 30-35 minutes or until puffed, very firm and golden brown. Pierce sides of each puff with tip of a knife. Cool on wire racks. Cut top third off each puff.
In a large bowl, beat cream until it begins to thicken. Add confectioners’ sugar, eggnog, vanilla and nutmeg; beat until soft peaks form. Fill cream puffs with whipped cream just before serving; replace tops. Dust with additional confectioners’ sugar. Serve immediately.

source

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-01T14:36:44+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 01 Oct 2018 14:36:44 +0000 31, in #brunch, film history, nostalgic

 

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A Town Called Blue (yesterday in your heart)

A Town Called Blue (yesterday in your heart)

Originally posted on :

MissBackInTheDayUSA

featured image source
CAR HOPS N’ DRIVE INS!

Precious memories are eventful consisting of colors, fragrances, sounds and/or descriptive words that stimulate our senses and give vision to past experiences.

Our USA times and culture are treasured in many ways. Without history there is no nostalgia; without nostalgia, there is no history.

Keepsakes of all kinds (an artifact, documents, etc.), breathe life into the story tells of memories, enabling shares thru media and other forms of communication. And, do they ever relieve stifled hearts and minds.

Ask any oldtimer and he would agree, that it is such a fascination to re-experience those special moments in time.

Blue is my folly of an nostalgic-American suburb in the heart of yesterday. It’s like a painting, of a rainbow, on a dream; or, fraying minstrels of heartache, into dances of imagination.

Imagine that time, that place where closely-knit communities, families and friends were so connected… There — most healthy traditions were born.

~Miss Back In The Day USA (AmericaOnCoffee)~

Car Hops

The Miami Herald reported in 1952 on the burgeoning number of local drive-in restaurants staffed by scantily clad young women. “There seems to be a race going on among Miami drive-in restaurant owners to see who can clothe curvaceous curb cuties in the tightest sweaters and the briefest shorts,” a Herald story by reporter Pat Murphy said. “Within metropolitan city limits, there are some 150 drive-in hasheries operating throughout the year. Of these roadside restaurants, about seven-eighths of them are known to have curb girls — ‘car hops,’ if you please — sprinting between car and kitchen wearing uniforms with little more fabric than two handkerchiefs.” One of the restaurants mentioned was Colonel Jim’s Tasty Thrill on the 79th Street Causeway in Miami Beach where the car hops brought food to patrons in their cars. A sign instructed: “Blink lights for service.”

http://www.flashbackmiami.com

Car hop days provide happy memories

When I was a teenager and was allowed to use the family car, I would meet my friends at the Washington Boulevard location. I remember the servers would rollerskate up to our car and take our orders. Sometimes, when they put the tray with food and drinks on the window trays, they would spill either on themselves or on us, and they would apologize to no end. I remember we would pass food from one car to another and on warm nights sit on the hood of the car and just have a ball laughing, planning our summer nights. I remember when it rained, how they tried to keep the food dry.

When I tell my now adult children about these wonderful times, they don’t believe me, but these are some of the best memories of my life and always make me smile and laugh. I wish I could turn the clock back to those wonderful days. Now we go to the McKnight Road location and are considered regulars, as your staff recognizes us and really takes care of us. We truly love going there. We go at least 2 to 4 times a month. Congratulations and Happy Birthday!

The Kaufmans
Pittsburgh, PA

Memories of Swensons

I first saw Ron, my future husband, in home room freshman year at Buchtel High School, September 1952. The teacher seated us alphabetically, then told us to turn around and to say ‘Hi’ to the person in back. I saw the back of his head first, then when he turned around I saw the cutest guy in the world. I think I determined right then to marry him, but it took me nine years to convince him of that. We dated off and on for all those nine years.


In April 1961, he returned to Akron from basic training in the National Guard. I though for sure he would proposed that night and my heart sank when he didn’t. A week later on April 21, 1961, he picked me up from a night class at Akron University. I was teaching school during the day. He drove me to Swensons Drive In at the corner of Hawkins and West Market Street. It was there, parked in the car waiting for our wonderful hamburgers that he pulled a diamond ring out of his pocket. What a thrill! A night that is etched in my memory.

We will have been married for 48 years come Sept. 9. And it was certainly worth waiting nine years for that wonderful man!

Pat Miller, Akron



Source: http://www.ohio.com

http://www.popularmechanics.com/
 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-01T14:19:06+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 01 Oct 2018 14:19:06 +0000 31, in nostalgic

 

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“Blue Suede Shoes” Elvis Presley!

Blue Suede Shoes” is a rock-and-rollstandard written and first recorded by Carl Perkins in 1955. It is considered one of the first rockabilly (rock-and-roll) records, incorporating elements of blues, country and pop music of the time. Perkins’ original version of the song was on the Cashbox Best Selling Singles list for 16 weeks and spent two weeks in the number two position. Elvis Presley performed his version of the song three different times on national television. It was also recorded by Buddy Holly and Eddie Cochran, among many others.

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-01T14:16:59+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 01 Oct 2018 14:16:59 +0000 31, in nostalgic, rocknroll

 

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Classic Appetizers BACON WRAPPED Dates

1950s Appetizers & Classic Cocktail Recipe – the Algonquin!

Velveteen Lounge Kitsch-en

Four 1950s appetizers and a classic cocktail – the Algonquin! Recipes below!

Recipes:

  • Algonquin Cocktail (my proportions)
  • 2 oz rye
  • ½ oz dry vermouth
  • ½ oz pineapple juice

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass!

  • Deviled Eggs
  • 6 hard boiled eggs that have been sliced in half, with the yolks milled or mashed
  • 1 TBSP mayonnaise
  • 1½ tsp vinegar
  • A dash of black pepper
  • ¾ tsp mustard
  • ½ tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • ¼ tsp salt

Combine all ingredients except egg whites and spoon into whites. I like to sprinkle mine with cayenne pepper.

Shrimp and Cottage Cheese Dunk

  • ½ lb cooked, chopped shrimp
  • 1 cup cottage cheese
  • 3 TBSP chili sauce
  • ½ tsp vinegar or onion juice
  • ½ tsp lemon juice
  • ¼ tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 4 TBSP milk

INSTRUCTIONS
Combine all ingredients and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Pigs In Blankets
Refrigerator pizza crust or crescent rolls from a tube

Cocktail franks
Slice pizza crust or crescent rolls into strips sized to wrap around cocktail franks. Wrap and bake at 450 degrees for about 10 minutes or until browned.

Bacon Wrapped Dates
Pitted dates
Parmesan cheese into pitted dates
Bacon
Stuff a piece of cheese into each date. Wrap with a half slice of bacon and secure with a toothpick. Bake at 400 degrees for about 15 minutes, or until browned.

Cocktails, party bites, road trips to fabulous bars and the occasional boozy music video! New episodes every Tuesday and Friday! #cocktail. source

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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-01T14:10:11+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 01 Oct 2018 14:10:11 +0000 31, in food, nostalgic

 

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“Change Me If You Can – Barbara Mason”

Singer/songwriter Barbara “Lady Love” Mason, one of the true pioneers of Philly-Soul, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1947. … She was still a minor when she had her first hit record “Yes, I’m Ready” in 1965.

source

Mason initially focused on songwriting when she entered the music industry in her teens. As a performer, though, she had a major hit single with her third release in 1965, “Yes, I’m Ready” (#5 pop, #2 R&B). She had modest success throughout the rest of the decade on the small Arctic label, run by her manager, top Philadelphia disc-jockey, Jimmy Bishop. She reached the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 Top 40again in 1965 with “Sad, Sad Girl”, and “Oh How It Hurts” in 1967. A two-year stay with National General Records, run by a film production company, produced one album and four singles which failed to find success.[citation needed]

In the 1970s, Mason signed to Buddah Records and toughened her persona, singing about sexual love and infidelity with an uncommon frankness at the time in songs like “Bed and Board”, “From His Woman to You”, and “Shackin’ Up” and would interrupt her singing to deliver straight-talking ‘raps’ about romance. She also continued to write some of her new material. Curtis Mayfield produced her on a cover version of Mayfield’s own “Give Me Your Love”, which restored her to the pop Top 40 and R&B Top Ten in 1973; “From His Woman to You” (the response to Shirley Brown’s single “Woman to Woman”) and “Shackin’ Up”, produced by former Stax producer Don Davis in Detroit were also solid soul sellers in the mid-1970s.

After leaving Buddah Records in 1975, surprisingly after two top ten R&B hits, she only dented the charts periodically on small labels. They included “I Am Your Woman, She Is Your Wife”, which was produced in 1978 by Weldon McDougal who had produced her first major success, “Yes I’m Ready”, and later in 1984, “Another Man” on West End Records.

Mason started to concentrate on running her own publishing company in the late 1980s, but continues to perform occasionally. She released a new CD, Feeling Blue, in September 2007. Mason is still performing to sold-out audiences in 2016. Her most recent show is at the Terrance Theater in Long Beach, California. Mason was inducted into the Soul Music Hall of Fame on March 1, 2016.

“Oh How It Hurts” in 1967. A two-year stay with National General Records, run by a film production company, produced one album and four singles which failed to find success.[citation needed]

In the 1970s, Mason signed to Buddah Records and toughened her persona, singing about sexual love and infidelity with an uncommon frankness at the time in songs like “Bed and Board”, “From His Woman to You”, and “Shackin’ Up” and would interrupt her singing to deliver straight-talking ‘raps’ about romance. She also continued to write some of her new material. Curtis Mayfield produced her on a cover version of Mayfield’s own “Give Me Your Love”, which restored her to the pop Top 40 and R&B Top Ten in 1973; “From His Woman to You” (the response to Shirley Brown’s single “Woman to Woman”) and “Shackin’ Up”, produced by former Stax producer Don Davis in Detroit were also solid soul sellers in the mid-1970s.

After leaving Buddah Records in 1975, surprisingly after two top ten R&B hits, she only dented the charts periodically on small labels. They included “I Am Your Woman, She Is Your Wife”, which was produced in 1978 by Weldon McDougal who had produced her first major success, “Yes I’m Ready”, and later in 1984, “Another Man” on West End Records.

Mason started to concentrate on running her own publishing company in the late 1980s, but continues to perform occasionally. She released a new CD, Feeling Blue, in September 2007. Mason is still performing to sold-out audiences in 2016. Her most recent show is at the Terrance Theater in Long Beach, California. Mason was inducted into the Soul Music Hall of Fame on March 1, 2016.

source

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-01T13:49:16+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 01 Oct 2018 13:49:16 +0000 31, in 1960s, nostalgic, r&b

 

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Healthy Breakfast: Fig Pancakes

SUPER FLUFFY VEGAN PANCAKES AND SEASONAL FIGS (V+, ChF, NF) WITH AIMEE FROM WALLFLOWER KITCHEN

These pancakes are so lovely, but sadly I can’t really take any credit for their brilliance, as the recipe is actually Aimee’s. She was just kind enough to let me jazz up the batter with a spunky flavour combo and allow me to take the lead on the styling (thank you Aimee). But I must confess I couldn’t have been happier to take a backseat as I got to watch her whizz up this fabulous pancake batter (GBBO contestants, watch your back cuz Aimee’s coming for you #batterweek) and then eat most of the pancakes myself too.

Preparation Time: 5 minutes
Cooking Time: 15 minutes
Makes: 10-12 pancakes
Serves: 4-5

PANCAKE INGREDIENTS:
1 cup spelt flour
1/2 cup plain white flour
2 tbsp arrowroot powder or cornstarch
2 tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp ground cardamom
a good pinch of salt
zest of 1 small unwaxed organic orange
3-6 tbsp maple syrup
2 tsp apple cider vinegar
1 cup dairy-free milk (we used almond milk)
4 tbsp rice bran oil

PANCAKE TOPPINGS (OPTIONAL):
Date or maple syrup
Fresh seasonal fruit, we used figs and red currants
a dollop of coconut yoghurt

RECIPE INSTRUCTIONS:
Heat a small, dry frying pan (like this one) on a low heat.
Mix the dry ingredients together in a large bowl.
Stir in the wet ingredients until well combined and the texture is only slightly runny.
Ladle approximately ¼ cup of the batter onto the dry pan and cook for 20-30 seconds before carefully flipping onto the other side. Cook for another 20-30 seconds.
Repeat with the rest of the batter.
Serve with fresh fruit and syrup and enjoy!

Recipe source

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/New_York2018-10-01T13:20:50+00:00America/New_York10bAmerica/New_YorkMon, 01 Oct 2018 13:20:50 +0000 31, in breakfast, nostalgic

 

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