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Category Archives: nostalgic

“THE LEECH WOMAN” trailer

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Directed by Edward Dein
Produced by John Greshenson
Written by Story:
Ben Pivar
Francis Rosenwald
Screenplay:
David Duncan
Starring Grant Williams
Coleen Gray
Phillip Terry
Gloria Talbott
John van Dreelen
Estelle Hemsley
Kim Hamilton
Arthur Batanides
Music by Irving Gertz
Uncredited:
Hans J. Salteri
Henry Vars
Cinematography Ellis W. Carter
Edited by Milton Carruth
Distributed by Universal-International
Release dates
May 1960
Running time
77 minutes
Country United States

“The Leech Woman” is a 1960 American film, directed by Edward Dein…. the birth of facelifts, makeovers to horror.

Plot
A mysterious old woman named Malla (Estelle Hemsley) who claims to have been brought to America 140 years ago by Arab slavers approaches endocrinologist Dr. Paul Talbot (Phillip Terry) and promises to reveal to him the secret of eternal youth.

Following her back to Africa, he and his aging, unhappy wife June (Coleen Gray) witness a secret ceremony of the Nando tribe that utilizes orchid pollen and a male victim’s pineal gland secretions extracted from the back of the neck via a special ring to temporarily transform Malla once more into a young and beautiful girl (Kim Hamilton).

After discovering her conniving husband only brought her along as a test subject, June has him killed as a sacrifice and becomes young herself, though she is warned that it will not last long. She steals the ring and escapes back to the United States after killing another man. Pretending to be her own ‘niece’ Terry Hart, she proceeds to keep herself young by killing men for their pineal extract.

She quickly becomes enamored with her lawyer Neil Foster (Grant Williams), a man half her actual age, and kills his jealous fiancee Sally (Gloria Talbott), both to maintain her youthful appearance and to eliminate the competition.

When the cops come to investigate the murders, June uses Sally’s pineal gland when alone but finds it does not work due to it being female, and before the cops find her, she throws herself out a window and dies, and when they view her body it is in more of a shriveled state than ever.

en.m.wikipedia.org

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“1960 HITS ARCHIVE – Go Jimmy Go – Jimmy Clanton”

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Jimmy Clanton (born September 2, 1938, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States) is an American singer who became known as the “swamp pop R&B teenage idol”.[1] His band recorded a hit song “Just A Dream” which Clanton had written in 1958 for the Ace Records label. It reached number four on the Billboard chart and sold a million copies.[2] Clanton performed on Dick Clark’s American Bandstand and toured with popular artists like Fats Domino, Jerry Lee Lewis and The Platters.[3]

History

Clanton formed his first band called the Rockets in 1956 while attending Baton Rouge High School.

One of the few white singers to come out of the New Orleans R&B/rock & roll sound, he rode the crest of the popular teen music wave in the 1950s and 1960s. His records charted in the U.S. Top 40 seven times (all released on Ace); his Top 10 records were: the song “Just a Dream,” (Pop #4, R&B #1 in August 1958, credited to ‘Jimmy Clanton and His Rockets’), “

Go Jimmy Go

” (peaked at number five in late 1959) and “Venus in Blue Jeans” in September 1962 (written by Howard Greenfield and Jack Keller).[4] In early 1961, Clanton was drafted and spent the next two years in the U.S. Army, continuing to have chart successes with “Don’t Look at Me” and “Because I Do.” His next major hit, “Venus in Blue Jeans,” peaked at number seven in mid-1962.[5] His only hit in the UK Singles Chart was “Another Sleepless Night”, which spent one week at number 50 in July 1960.[6]

Clanton starred in a rock and roll movie produced by Alan Freed called Go Johnny Go,[2] and later starred in Teenage Millionaire, with music arranged and produced by Dr. John and arranger/trumpeter Charlie Miller.[7] During the late 1950s and early 1960s Clanton was managed by Cosimo Matassa, the New Orleans recording studio owner and engineer. In May 1960, Ace Records announced in Billboard that Philadelphia had proclaimed the week of May 16 to be “Jimmy Clanton Week.”[8]

Clanton became a disc jockey at WHEX in Columbia, Pennsylvania between 1972 and 1976 and performed in an oldies revue also in the 1970s, The Masters of Rock ‘n’ Roll, with Troy Shondell, Ray Peterson, and Ronnie Dove. He had a religious conversion in the 1980s.[citation needed] In the 1995 Jazz Fest in New Orleans, Clanton performed with Ray Charles, Chuck Berry, and Frankie Ford.

Clanton was inducted into The Museum of the Gulf Coast Hall of Fame, which also has inducted such performers as Tex Ritter, Janis Joplin, ZZ Top and B. J. Thomas.[9]

On April 14, 2007, at a “Legends of Louisiana Celebration & Inductions” concert in Mandeville, Louisiana, Jimmy Clanton was inducted into The Louisiana Music Hall of Fame.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
 

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“THE BUNNY – HOP DANCE” LOL …funny 1950s line dance!

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The Bunny Hop
was a novelty dance created at Balboa High School in San Francisco in 1952.[1] It is a social mixer dance, sometimes also referred to as a “party” or “dance party” dance.

History

The dance has been generally done to Ray Anthony’s big band recording of the song with this name.[1] It was a vocal hit in 1952, and instrumentally re-recorded c. 1958. The song has been re-recorded by others, including musical updates of the style, for example, a Salsa version. Duke Ellington recorded “Bunny Hop Mambo” in 1954. Other popular music of the era is also used, such as “The Glow-Worm.”

Ray Anthony’s single release of the “Bunny Hop” featured another novelty dance classic, the “Hokey Pokey” on the B side.

Description

The dance is a variation on a conga line. Participants dance in a line or a circle, holding on to the hips of the person in front of them. They tap the floor two times with their right foot, then with their left foot, then they hop forwards, backwards, and finally three hops forward to finish the sequence, which continues throughout the tune. The first person in the line or the open circle leads the group around the floor.

en.m.wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on May 22, 2018 in nostalgic

 

“The Window” (1949) You’ve Had A Bad Dream!

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An extraordinary film about a little boy who fabricates his daily events (because he is imaginative). But when he later attempts to explain a murder, everyone believes he is once again imagining.

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The Window is a 1949 American black-and-white suspense film noir, based on the short story “The Boy Cried Murder” (reprinted as “Fire Escape”)[4] by Cornell Woolrich.[5] The film, which was a critical success, was produced by Frederic Ullman, Jr. for $210,000 but earned much more, making it a box office hit for RKO Pictures. The film was directed by Ted Tetzlaff, who worked as a cinematographer on over 100 films, including another successful suspense film, Alfred Hitchcock’s Notorious (1946).

Plot

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Set and filmed on location in the tenement section of New York’s Lower East Side, the film tells the story of a young boy, Tommy Woodry (Driscoll), who has a habit of crying wolf. Late one night, he climbs up the building fire escape and sees his two seemingly normal neighbors, Mr and Mrs Kellerson, murder a drunken sailor in their apartment. No one, neither the boy’s parents nor the police, believes young Tommy when he tells them what he has seen, since they all assume that this is just another of the boy’s tall tales.

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When Mrs. Woodry takes Tommy to apologize to the Kellersons, he refuses and they become suspicious of him. When Mrs. Woodry leaves to care for a sick relative and Mr. Woodry is away at his night job, the murderous neighbors plan to kill Tommy who has been locked in his room by his father to prevent further escapades. Under the pretense of going to the police, the Kellersons take Tommy to a dark alley, where they try to kill him. Tommy escapes, but the pair recapture him, taking him back to their apartment in a taxi. Tommy screams at a policeman for help, but the officer remembers Tommy as the boy who came to the station earlier and failed to convince the police. The Kellersons fool the cab driver by posing as Tommy’s parents. Mr. Woodry returns to find Tommy missing. Mr. Woodry asks a police officer for help.

Meanwhile, the Kellersons have Tommy secured in their apartment. Tommy escapes and climbs on the roof pursued by Mr. Kellerson, but Mrs. Kellerson has a change of heart about killing Tommy. The police officer suggests Tommy went to see his mother, and he and Mr. Woodry leave the tenement. Tommy sees his father leave in his car and yells for him, which causes Mr. Kellerson to locate Tommy. The chase resumes with Tommy finding the body of the dead sailor. The upper building starts to collapse. As Mr. Kellerson is about to grab Tommy, a rafter collapses and Kellerson falls to his death. Tommy screams loud enough for neighbors to hear and call the police. The boy is rescued and his parents are proud of him.

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Aside

coast rabbit

Marian Breland Bailey – Coast Federal Savings TV Commercial (1950s)

Marian Breland Bailey, born Marian Ruth Kruse (December 2, 1920 …. The Buck Bunny commercial featured their trained rabbits for a Coast Federal Savings … and which still holds the record for longest running TV commercial advertisement.

en.m.wikipedia.org

coast federal savings

Coast Federal Savings TV Commercial (1950s)

 

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“Tommy Boyce on the Lloyd Thaxton Show – 1964”

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Lloyd Thaxton

was a local “freelance” announcer in Los Angeles in the late 1950s when, through a deal with a television station manager, got his own weekday television show on KCOP, Lloyd Thaxton’s Record Shop. Record Shop would eventually lead to

The Lloyd Thaxton Show

a live music entertainment show from Los Angeles in the vein of Dick Clark’s American Bandstand. Thaxton’s show was a wacky hour of dancing high school teenagers, skits, and comedy by Thaxton, and musical features by the top pop, rock, folk and country artists of the day. Originally called Lloyd Thaxton’s Hop,

The Lloyd Thaxton Show

which launched on KCOP-TV in late 1961, would go into national syndication in 1964 and become the highest rated musical entertainment program in the U.S. for the next 3 years. In 1967, after more than 2000 episodes, Thaxton retired the show and ventured into other programs and parts of the industry, eventually ending up winning five Emmy Awards with 15 more Emmy nominations. Only about 40 hours of the original 2000+ shows still exist and have been edited into a “Best Of” DVD set, which has been held up because of legalities. Thaxton passed away in 2008 at the age of 81 after a short fight against multiple melanoma.

http://www.tv.com/shows/the-lloyd-thaxton-show/

 

“Da Do Run Run – The Crystals (1963)”

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The Crystals were an American vocal group based in New York, considered one of the defining acts of the girl group era in the first half of the 1960s. Their 1961–1964 chart hits, including “There’s No Other (Like My Baby)”, “Uptown”, “He’s Sure the Boy I Love”, “He’s a Rebel”, “Da Doo Ron Ron” and “Then He Kissed Me”, featured three successive female lead singers, and were all produced by Phil Spector. The latter three songs were originally ranked #267, #114, and #493, respectively, on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. However, two songs were dropped from the magazine’s 2010 update.

https://youtu.be/uTqnam1zgiw

 
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Posted by on May 21, 2018 in 1960s, classic music, nostalgic

 

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