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REUNION – NOSTALGIC HIPPIES

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“Little Caesar & The Romans – Those Oldies But Goodies”

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Little Caesar & the Romans

were an American musical group from Los Angeles active briefly in the 1960s.

The Romans minus Little Caesar began recording in 1959 as The Cubans, but changed their name to The Upfronts after the Bay of Pigs Invasion. They had three hits: the first and biggest was the nostalgic tune “Those Oldies but Goodies (Reminds {sic} Me of You)”, a #9 Pop and #28 R&B hit in 1961.[1] “Those Oldies But Goodies” was written by Paul Politi. Charles Wright, the famous leader of Charles Wright and his Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band, at the time was A&R Director for Del-Fi Records. Wright played both piano and bass on the original “Hit” recording of “Those Oldies But Goodies” (Reminds Me of You). The follow-up, “Hully Gully Again”, hit #54,[1] and subsequent release “Memories of those Oldies but Goodies” Bubbled Under at #101.[2] They also released a full-length album on Del-Fi Records.

David Johnson served a lengthy prison term beginning shortly after Hully Gully Again, and when he was released from prison, he reformed a group using the name Little Caesar and the Romans. They worked briefly in the mid seventies, performing at Art Laboe’s Club on the Sunset Strip. Singer Rickie Lee Jones was a back up singer for that show. ” The group’s live act sometimes included wearing togas on stage and on Dick Clark’s “American Bandstand” television show. They broke up in 1962, at least partly due to an argument between lead singer Carl (Little Caesar) Burnett and member David Johnson (who performed the spoken-word portion of “Those Oldies but Goodies”) as to which of them should be called Little Caesar.[2] In 1975, Johnson put together a new Little Caesar And The Romans and recorded a single called “Disco Hully Gully”. For a while they toured as Marvin Gaye’s opening act.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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“Ballads – God Bless Our Love – Venture: 615 DJ”

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The Ballads were an American vocal group formed in 1961 in Oakland. Band members included Nathaniel Romerson, Jon Foster, Rico Thompson, and Lesley LaPalma.[1] The band had one hit single in 1968, entitled “God Bless Our Love”. This song reached #65 on the Billboard pop singles charts[2] and #8 on the R&B Singles charts.[3] This song was picked by WDIA program director Bill Thomas as a “Biggest Leftfield Happening” in Billboard’s programming aids.[4] The B side of this record was the song “My Baby Knows How to Love Her Man.” This record was released on Venture Records #615.[2]

Nathaniel “Nate” Romerson died April 22, 2013. He started the group in 1961, and he was also one of the back ground singers.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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“I Know Something About Love…. Tell Him”

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The Exciters was an American pop music group of the 1960s. They were originally a girl group, with one male member being added afterwards. At the height of their popularity the group consisted of lead singer Brenda Reid, her husband Herb Rooney, Carolyn Johnson and Lillian Walker.

Career

Brenda Reid, Carolyn (Carol) Johnson, Lillian Walker, and Sylvia Wilbur formed the group while at high school together in Queens, New York City, in 1961. They were originally called the Masterettes, as a sister group to another group called the Masters, and released their first recording, “Follow the Leader”, in early 1962. Wilbur then left the group to be replaced by Penny Carter, and they auditioned for Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, winning a recording contract. Penny Carter then left, and was replaced by Herb Rooney, a member of the Masters; Reid and Rooney later married.[1]

The group’s name was changed to the Exciters, and their first hit record, arranged by George “Teacho” Wiltshire and produced by Leiber and Stoller for United Artists Records, was “Tell Him”, which reached no.4 on the U.S. pop chart in early 1963. The song had previously been recorded unsuccessfully, as “Tell Her”, by Gil Hamilton later known as Johnny Thunder.[2] According to Jason Ankeny at AllMusic, the Exciters’ version of “Tell Him” “…boasted an intensity that signified a sea change in the presentation and perception of femininity in popular music, paving the way for such tough, sexy acts as the Shangri-Las and the Ronettes.”[1]

Dusty Springfield was on a stop-over in New York City en route to Nashville to make a country music album with the Springfields in 1962, when she heard the Exciters’ “Tell Him” playing while taking a late-night walk by the Colony Record Store on Broadway. The song helped Springfield decide to embark on a solo career with a Pop/Soul direction. She’d recall: “The Exciters sort of got you by the throat…out of the blue comes blasting at you “I know something about love”, and that’s it. That’s what I wanna do.”[3]

Other songs by the group included “He’s Got the Power” (written by Ellie Greenwich and Tony Powers), “Get Him”, and Northern Soul classic “Blowing Up My Mind”. The Exciters also recorded “Do-Wah-Diddy”, written by Greenwich and Jeff Barry, in 1963; with a revised title of “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” it was covered shortly after by Manfred Mann, for whom it was an international hit.

In 1965, the Exciters left the Leiber-Stoller management team, and the United Artists label, for Roulette Records. There they issued a remake (with revised lyrics) of the Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers’ song “I Want You to Be My Boy.” They continued to record through the 1960s for Bert Berns’ labels Bang and Shout, and later for RCA, but with little success.[1] Ronnie Pace and Skip McPhee replaced Johnson and Walker.[4] The group broke up in 1974.[2]

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Watch “Exciters 1963” on YouTube

 

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“Be my baby – The Ronettes”

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The Ronettes were an American girl group from New York City. One of the most popular groups from the 1960s, they placed nine songs on the Billboard Hot 100, five of which became Top 40 hits. The trio from Spanish Harlem, New York,[1] consisted of lead singer Veronica Bennett (later known as Ronnie Spector), her older sister Estelle Bennett and their cousin Nedra Talley. Among the Ronettes’ most famous songs are “Be My Baby”, “Baby, I Love You”, “(The Best Part of) Breakin’ Up”, and “Walking in the Rain”, all of which charted on the Billboard Hot 100. “Walking in the Rain” won a Grammy Award in 1965, and “Be My Baby” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999.[2] The Ronettes were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2007.

The girls had sung together since they were teenagers, when they were known as “The Darling Sisters”. Signed first by Colpix Records in 1961, they moved to Phil Spector’s Philles Records in March 1963, and changed their name to “The Ronettes.” In late 1964, the group released their only studio album, Presenting the Fabulous Ronettes Featuring Veronica, which entered the Billboard charts at number 96. Rolling Stone ranked it number 422 on its list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[3] The group were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2004. The Ronettes were the only girl group to tour with the Beatles.

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“The Chiffons – My Boyfriend’s Back”

“The Chiffons – My Boyfriend’s Back”

My Boyfriend’s Back” was a hit song in 1963 for the Angels, an American girl group. It was written by the songwriting team of Bob Feldman, Jerry Goldstein and Richard Gottehrer (a.k.a. FGG Productions who later formed the group the Strangeloves).[1] The recording, employing the services of drummer Gary Chester,[2] was originally intended as a demo for the Shirelles, but ended up being released as recorded.[3] The single spent three weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot 100chart, and reached number two on the R&B Billboard.

The song is a word of warning to a would-be suitor who, after the narrator of the song rebuffed his advances, went on to spread nasty rumors accusing the narrator of romantic indiscretions. Now, the narrator declares, her boyfriend is back in town and ready to settle the score, and she tells the rebuffed would-be suitor to watch his back.

Other musicians on the record included Herbie Lovelle on drums, Billy Butler, Bobby Comstock, and Al Gorgoni on guitar, and Bob Bushnell overdubbing on an electric and an upright bass. This song also features a brass section as well.

The song begins with a spoken recitation from the lead singer that goes: “He went away, and you hung around, and bothered me every night. And when I wouldn’t go out with you, you said things that weren’t very nice.”

The album version features the line: “Hey. I can see him comin’/ Now you better start a runnin'”. before the instrumental repeat of the bridge section and a repeat of one stanza from the refrain, before the coda section.

The inspiration for the song was when co-writer Bob Feldman overheard a conversation between a high school girl and the boy she was rebuffing.

Billboard named the song #24 on their list of 100 Greatest Girl Group Songs of All Time.

Wikipedia.org

 

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“The cookies – Don’t say nothing bad about my baby”

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The Cookies were an American R&B girl group in the 1950s to 1960s. Members of the original lineup would later become the Raelettes, the backing vocalists for Ray Charles.

History

Formed in 1954 in Brooklyn, New York, the Cookies’ membership originally consisted of Dorothy Jones, Darlene McCrea and Dorothy’s cousin, Beulah Robertson. Robertson was replaced in 1956 by Margie Hendricks (Hendrix). The group was introduced to Ray Charles through their session work for Atlantic Records. After backing him and other Atlantic Records artists, McCrea and Hendricks helped form the Raelettes in 1958. (Pat Lyles was a Raelette, but never a Cookie.)

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on February 5, 2018 in nostalgic, vintage music

 

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