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Category Archives: vintage music

Claudine Clark – Party Lights

Claudine Clark – Party Lights

Claudine Clark (born April 26, 1941) is an American R&B musician, best known as the singer and composer of the 1962 hit, “Party Lights”, which reached #5 on the BillboardHot 100.

Clark was born in Macon, Georgia, but grew up in Philadelphia, began recording in 1958 for the Herald record label, then moved to New York. She had a hit with her second single for Chancellor Records, the self-penned “Party Lights,” but her follow-up, “Walkin’ Through a Cemetery”, was a commercial failure. She continued to record and compose, including under the alias Joy Dawn for the Swan Records label.

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“Gary U.S. Bonds – New Orleans (stereo)”

“Gary U.S. Bonds – New Orleans (stereo)”

Gary U.S. Bonds (born Gary Levone Anderson, June 6, 1939, in Jacksonville, Florida)[1] is an American rhythm and blues and rock and roll singer, known for his classic hits “New Orleans” and “Quarter to Three”. His career spans several decades and he is also a prolific songwriter.

Career

Born in Jacksonville, Florida, Bonds lived in Norfolk, Virginia, in the 1950s when he began singing publicly in church and with a group called the Turks.[1] He joined record producer Frank Guida’s small Legrand Records label where Guida chose Anderson’s stage name, U.S. Bonds, in hopes that it would be confused with a public service announcement advertising the sale of government bonds and thereby garner more radio airplay.[2] His first three singles and first album, Dance ‘Til Quarter to Three, were released under the U.S. Bonds name, but people assumed it was the name of a group. To avoid confusion, subsequent releases, including his second album Twist Up Calypso, were made under the name Gary (U.S.) Bonds. The parentheses were discarded in the 1970s.[3][4]

Bonds’ first hit was the song “New Orleans” (US No.6)[citation needed], which was followed by “Not Me”, a flop for Bonds but later a hit for the Orlons, and then by his only number one hit, “Quarter to Three” in June 1961. “Quarter To Three” sold one million records, earning a gold disc.[1] Subsequent hits, under his modified name, included “School Is Out” (#5), “Dear Lady Twist” (#9), “School Is In” (#28) and “Twist, Twist, Señora” (#10) in the early 1960s. In a 1963 tour of Europe, he headlined above the Beatles. His hits featured solos by the saxophonist Gene Barge.[3]

“Quarter to Three” appears on The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll list.[5]

In the early 1980s, Bonds had a career resurgence with two albums Dedication and On the Line, collaborations with Bruce Springsteen, Steven Van Zandt, and the E Street Band, and had hits including “This Little Girl” (his comeback hit in 1981, which reached #11 on the pop chart in Billboard and #5 on the mainstream rock chart), “Jolé Blon” and “Out of Work”.[3] Bonds continues to release albums sporadically, and today is a mainstay of the nostalgia concert circuit.[citation needed]

While Bonds is mostly known for achievements within rhythm and blues and rock and roll, he often transcends these genres, e.g., his song “She’s All I Got”, co-written by Jerry Williams, Jr. (better known as Swamp Dogg), was nominated for the Country Music Association’s “Song of the Year” in 1972 when it was a big hit for Johnny Paycheck (Freddie North also charted his only pop hit with a soul cover of the same song). He is also a 1997 honoree of the Rhythm & Blues Foundation. Bonds is an accomplished golfer and often plays celebrity PGA Tour events.[3] Bonds guested in Blues Brothers 2000 in 1998 as part of a rival blues supergroup the Louisiana Gator Boys.

Bonds released an album in 2004 called Back in 20, the title referencing his repeated sporadic pop-ups of popularity (his first hits were in the 1960s, then again in the 1980s, and now another significant album in the early 2000s, each 20-odd years apart). The album features guest appearances by Springsteen and Southside Johnny.[3] Bonds was also inducted into the Long Island Music Hall of Fame on October 15, 2006.

In 2009 he released a new album Let Them Talk and toured the UK as a special guest of Bill Wyman’s Rhythm Kings.[6] Most recently, in 2010, Bonds contributed duet vocals on the song “Umbrella in My Drink” on Southside Johnny’s album Pills and Ammo.[7] He also made a guest appearance in the 3rd series of Lillyhammer which stars and is produced by Steven van Zandt.

 

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“Tommy Boyce on the Lloyd Thaxton Show – 1964”

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Lloyd Thaxton

was a local “freelance” announcer in Los Angeles in the late 1950s when, through a deal with a television station manager, got his own weekday television show on KCOP, Lloyd Thaxton’s Record Shop. Record Shop would eventually lead to

The Lloyd Thaxton Show

a live music entertainment show from Los Angeles in the vein of Dick Clark’s American Bandstand. Thaxton’s show was a wacky hour of dancing high school teenagers, skits, and comedy by Thaxton, and musical features by the top pop, rock, folk and country artists of the day. Originally called Lloyd Thaxton’s Hop,

The Lloyd Thaxton Show

which launched on KCOP-TV in late 1961, would go into national syndication in 1964 and become the highest rated musical entertainment program in the U.S. for the next 3 years. In 1967, after more than 2000 episodes, Thaxton retired the show and ventured into other programs and parts of the industry, eventually ending up winning five Emmy Awards with 15 more Emmy nominations. Only about 40 hours of the original 2000+ shows still exist and have been edited into a “Best Of” DVD set, which has been held up because of legalities. Thaxton passed away in 2008 at the age of 81 after a short fight against multiple melanoma.

http://www.tv.com/shows/the-lloyd-thaxton-show/

 

JACKIE WILSON, THAT’S WHY I LOVE YOU SO

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Jackie Wilson
Music artist

Jackie Wilson was one of the most important agents of black pop’s transition from R&B into soul. In terms of vocal power, few could outdo him; he was also an electrifying on-stage showman. He was a consistent… wikipedia.org
Born: June 9, 1934, Detroit, Michigan, USA. Died: January 21, 1984, Mount Holly, New Jersey, United States
Cause of Death: Pneumonia
Nationality: United States of America
Spouse: Harlean Harris (m. -1984), Freda Hood (m. -1965)

en.m.Wikipedia.irg

 

“Louis Armstrong – A Kiss To Build A Dream On [1962] Live”

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“A Kiss to Build a Dream On” is a song composed by Bert Kalmar, Harry Ruby and Oscar Hammerstein II in 1935.[1] It was recorded by Louis Armstrong in 1951.[1] It was also performed by Armstrong as well as by Mickey Rooney with William Demarest, by Sally Forrest, and by Kay Brown (virtually the entire cast performed part or all of the song) in the 1951 film “The Strip,” and was a sort of recurring theme in the film. Another popular recording was made by one of the movies guest-stars, Monica Lewis, and in early 1952, the version by Hugo Winterhalter and his Orchestra, with vocalist Johnny Parker, made it to the Pop 20 chart in the United States.

Sung by Richard Chamberlain, the song gained considerable exposure due to its being on the ‘B’ side of his 1962 hit: “Theme from Dr. Kildare (Three Stars Will Shine Tonight)”.

Rod Stewart covered the song in his 2004 album, Stardust: the Great American Songbook 3.

Deana Martin recorded A Kiss to Build a Dream On in 2009. The song was released on her album, Volare, in 2009 by Big Fish Records.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

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“Be my baby – The Ronettes”

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The Ronettes were an American girl group from New York City. One of the most popular groups from the 1960s, they placed nine songs on the Billboard Hot 100, five of which became Top 40 hits. The trio from Spanish Harlem, New York,[1] consisted of lead singer Veronica Bennett (later known as Ronnie Spector), her older sister Estelle Bennett and their cousin Nedra Talley. Among the Ronettes’ most famous songs are “Be My Baby”, “Baby, I Love You”, “(The Best Part of) Breakin’ Up”, and “Walking in the Rain”, all of which charted on the Billboard Hot 100. “Walking in the Rain” won a Grammy Award in 1965, and “Be My Baby” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999.[2] The Ronettes were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2007.

The girls had sung together since they were teenagers, when they were known as “The Darling Sisters”. Signed first by Colpix Records in 1961, they moved to Phil Spector’s Philles Records in March 1963, and changed their name to “The Ronettes.” In late 1964, the group released their only studio album, Presenting the Fabulous Ronettes Featuring Veronica, which entered the Billboard charts at number 96. Rolling Stone ranked it number 422 on its list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[3] The group were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2004. The Ronettes were the only girl group to tour with the Beatles.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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Santo & Johnny “Sleep Walk”

Santo & Johnny “Sleep Walk”

Sleepwalk” is Ultravox’s first single from their fourth album, Vienna, and their first with Midge Ure as frontman. It was Ultravox’s first UK Top 30 chart hit, hitting the lofty heights of Number 29. As well as the standard black vinyl, the 7 Inch was released as a limited clear vinyl.

The single’s B-side, “Waiting” is a more solemn, bass-laden affair in comparison to the faster synth work of the A-side. It now appears on the CD re-issue of Vienna as a bonus track, as well as various other Ultravox compilations.

The 12″ release does not contain an extended version of the song, or a third/additional song,[2] in fact it is simply a double A-sided promo single, with only “Sleepwalk” on each side. The sound quality however is rumoured to better and the sleeve apparently features a difference picture.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
 

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