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Some Men Will Do The Oddest Things…Just For Fun And At A Price. WATCH: “Tiny Tim – Tip Toe Through The Tulips (Live).mp4” on YouTube

Some Men Will Do The Oddest Things…Just For Fun And At A Price. WATCH: “Tiny Tim – Tip Toe Through The Tulips (Live).mp4” on YouTube

Tiny Tim, Singer, Dies at 64; Flirted, Chastely, With Fame

Tiny Tim, whose quavery falsetto and ukulele made ”Tiptoe Through the Tulips With Me” a novelty hit in 1968, died on Saturday night at the Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis. He was 64 and had lived in Minneapolis for the past year.

By WILLIAM GRIMES
Published: December 2, 1996

April 12, 1932 – November 30, 1996

Tiny Tim

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Candid Camera – The Catalyst (Early Reality TV) On YouTube

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Candid Camera is an American hidden camera/practical joke reality television series created and produced by Allen Funt, which initially began on radio as The Candid Microphone June 28, 1947. After a series of theatrical film shorts, also titled Candid Microphone, Funt’s concept came to television on August 10, 1948, and continued into the 1970s. Aside from occasional specials in the 1980s and 1990s, the show was off air until making a comeback on CBS in 1996, before moving to PAX in 2001. This incarnation of the weekly series ended on May 5, 2004, concurrent with the selling of the PAX network itself.

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Candid Camera
The format has appeared on U.S. TV networks and in syndication (first-run) in each succeeding decade, as either a regular show or a series of specials. Allen Funt hosted or co-hosted all versions of the show until he became too ill to continue. His son Peter Funt, who had co-hosted the specials with his father since 1987, became the producer and host.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

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“The Window” (1949) You’ve Had A Bad Dream!

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An extraordinary film about a little boy who fabricates his daily events (because he is imaginative). But when he later attempts to explain a murder, everyone believes he is once again imagining.

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The Window is a 1949 American black-and-white suspense film noir, based on the short story “The Boy Cried Murder” (reprinted as “Fire Escape”)[4] by Cornell Woolrich.[5] The film, which was a critical success, was produced by Frederic Ullman, Jr. for $210,000 but earned much more, making it a box office hit for RKO Pictures. The film was directed by Ted Tetzlaff, who worked as a cinematographer on over 100 films, including another successful suspense film, Alfred Hitchcock’s Notorious (1946).

Plot

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Set and filmed on location in the tenement section of New York’s Lower East Side, the film tells the story of a young boy, Tommy Woodry (Driscoll), who has a habit of crying wolf. Late one night, he climbs up the building fire escape and sees his two seemingly normal neighbors, Mr and Mrs Kellerson, murder a drunken sailor in their apartment. No one, neither the boy’s parents nor the police, believes young Tommy when he tells them what he has seen, since they all assume that this is just another of the boy’s tall tales.

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When Mrs. Woodry takes Tommy to apologize to the Kellersons, he refuses and they become suspicious of him. When Mrs. Woodry leaves to care for a sick relative and Mr. Woodry is away at his night job, the murderous neighbors plan to kill Tommy who has been locked in his room by his father to prevent further escapades. Under the pretense of going to the police, the Kellersons take Tommy to a dark alley, where they try to kill him. Tommy escapes, but the pair recapture him, taking him back to their apartment in a taxi. Tommy screams at a policeman for help, but the officer remembers Tommy as the boy who came to the station earlier and failed to convince the police. The Kellersons fool the cab driver by posing as Tommy’s parents. Mr. Woodry returns to find Tommy missing. Mr. Woodry asks a police officer for help.

Meanwhile, the Kellersons have Tommy secured in their apartment. Tommy escapes and climbs on the roof pursued by Mr. Kellerson, but Mrs. Kellerson has a change of heart about killing Tommy. The police officer suggests Tommy went to see his mother, and he and Mr. Woodry leave the tenement. Tommy sees his father leave in his car and yells for him, which causes Mr. Kellerson to locate Tommy. The chase resumes with Tommy finding the body of the dead sailor. The upper building starts to collapse. As Mr. Kellerson is about to grab Tommy, a rafter collapses and Kellerson falls to his death. Tommy screams loud enough for neighbors to hear and call the police. The boy is rescued and his parents are proud of him.

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“Tommy Boyce on the Lloyd Thaxton Show – 1964”

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Lloyd Thaxton

was a local “freelance” announcer in Los Angeles in the late 1950s when, through a deal with a television station manager, got his own weekday television show on KCOP, Lloyd Thaxton’s Record Shop. Record Shop would eventually lead to

The Lloyd Thaxton Show

a live music entertainment show from Los Angeles in the vein of Dick Clark’s American Bandstand. Thaxton’s show was a wacky hour of dancing high school teenagers, skits, and comedy by Thaxton, and musical features by the top pop, rock, folk and country artists of the day. Originally called Lloyd Thaxton’s Hop,

The Lloyd Thaxton Show

which launched on KCOP-TV in late 1961, would go into national syndication in 1964 and become the highest rated musical entertainment program in the U.S. for the next 3 years. In 1967, after more than 2000 episodes, Thaxton retired the show and ventured into other programs and parts of the industry, eventually ending up winning five Emmy Awards with 15 more Emmy nominations. Only about 40 hours of the original 2000+ shows still exist and have been edited into a “Best Of” DVD set, which has been held up because of legalities. Thaxton passed away in 2008 at the age of 81 after a short fight against multiple melanoma.

http://www.tv.com/shows/the-lloyd-thaxton-show/

 

 “The Untouchables – 1959 – TV Series – ABC” 

Genre: Crime drama

Starring: Robert Stack

Abel Fernandez

Nicholas Georgiade

Paul Picerni

Steve London

Bruce Gordon

Neville Brand

Narrated by Walter Winchell

Theme music composer Nelson Riddle

Composer(s) Bill Loose

Jack Cookerly

Nelson Riddle

Country of origin United States

Original language(s) English

No. of seasons: 4

No. of episodes: 118 & two-part pilot (list of episodes)

Production

Executive producer(s) Alan A. Armer

Desi Arnaz

Leonard Freeman

Quinn Martin

Jerry Thorpe

Producer(s) Alan A. Armer

Alvin Cooperman

Walter Grauman

Bert Granet

Paul Harrison

Herman Hoffman

Sidney Marshall

Vincent McEveety

Del Reisman

Norman Retchin

Lloyd Richards

Stuart Rosenberg

Charles Russell

Josef Shaftel

Cinematography Robert B. Hauser

Glen MacWilliams

Charles Straumer

Camera setup Single-camera

Running time 50 minutes

Production company(s) Desilu Productions

Langford Productions

Distributor Desilu Sales (until 1967)

Paramount Domestic Television (1967–2006)

CBS Paramount Domestic Television (2006–2007)

CBS Television Distribution (2007– )

Release

Original network ABC

Picture format Black-and-white

Audio format Monaural

Original release October 15, 1959 – May 21, 1963

The Untouchables is an American crime drama that ran from 1959 to 1963 on the ABC Television Network, produced by Desilu Productions. Based on the memoir of the same name by Eliot Ness and Oscar Fraley, it fictionalized Ness’ experiences as a Prohibition agent, fighting crime in Chicago in the 1930s with the help of a special team of agents handpicked for their courage, moral character, and incorruptibility, nicknamed the Untouchables. The book was later made into a film in 1987 (also called The Untouchables) by Brian De Palma, with a script by David Mamet, and a second, less-successful TV series in 1993.

A powerful, dynamic, hard-hitting action drama, and a landmark crime series,[1] The Untouchables won series star Robert Stack an Emmy Award for Best Actor in a Dramatic Series in 1960.[2]
en.m.wikipedia.org


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“Sunset Boulevard (1950) trailer”

“Sunset Boulevard (1950) trailer”

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Sunset Boulevard (stylized onscreen as SUNSET BLVD.) is a 1950 American black comedy/drama film noir[3] directed and co-written by Billy Wilder, and produced and co-written by Charles Brackett. It was named after the boulevard that runs through Los Angeles and Beverly Hills, California.

The film stars William Holden as Joe Gillis, an unsuccessful screenwriter, and Gloria Swanson as Norma Desmond, a faded silent movie star who draws him into her fantasy world where she dreams of making a triumphant return to the screen, with Erich von Stroheim as Max Von Mayerling, her devoted servant. Nancy Olson, Fred Clark, Lloyd Gough and Jack Webb play supporting roles. Director Cecil B. DeMille and gossip columnist Hedda Hopper play themselves, and the film includes cameo appearances by leading silent film actors Buster Keaton, H. B. Warner and Anna Q. Nilsson.

Praised by many critics when first released, Sunset Boulevard was nominated for eleven Academy Awards (including nominations in all four acting categories) and won three. It is widely accepted as a classic, often cited as one of the greatest films of American cinema. Deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” by the U.S. Library of Congress in 1989, Sunset Boulevard was included in the first group of films selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. In 1998, it was ranked number twelve on the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 best American films of the 20th century, and in 2007 it was 16th on their 10th Anniversary list.

Plot
At a Sunset Boulevard mansion, the body of Joe Gillis floats in the swimming pool. In a flashback, Joe relates the events leading to his death.

Six months earlier, down-on-his-luck screenwriter Joe tries selling Paramount Pictures producer Sheldrake on a story he submitted. Script reader Betty Schaefer harshly critiques it in Joe’s presence, unaware that he is the author. Later, while fleeing from repossession men seeking his car, Joe turns into the driveway of a seemingly deserted mansion. After concealing the car, he hears a woman calling him, apparently mistaking him for someone else. Ushered in by Max, her butler, Joe recognizes the woman as long-forgotten silent film star Norma Desmond. Learning he is a writer, she asks his opinion of a script she has written for a film about Salome. She plans to play the role herself in a comeback. Joe finds her script abysmal, but flatters her into hiring him as a script doctor.

Moved into Norma’s mansion at her insistence, Joe resents but gradually accepts his dependent situation. He sees that Norma refuses to face the fact that her fame has evaporated and learns the fan letters she still receives are secretly written by Max, who tells him Norma is subject to depression and has made suicide attempts.

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Norma lavishes attention on Joe and buys him expensive clothes. At her New Year’s Eve party, he discovers he is the only guest and realizes she has fallen in love with him. He tries to let her down gently, but she slaps him and retreats to her room.

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Joe visits his friend Artie Green to ask about staying at his place. At Artie’s party, he again meets Betty, who he learns is Artie’s girl. Betty thinks a scene in one of Joe’s scripts has potential, but Joe is uninterested. When Joe phones Max to have him pack his things, Max tells him Norma cut her wrists with his razor. Joe returns to Norma.

Norma has Max deliver the edited Salome script to her former director, Cecil B. DeMille, at Paramount. She starts getting calls from Paramount executive Gordon Cole, but petulantly refuses to speak to anyone except DeMille. Eventually, she has Max drive her and Joe to Paramount in her 1929 Isotta Fraschini.[4] The older studio employees warmly greet her. DeMille receives her affectionately and treats her with great respect, tactfully evading her questions about Salome. Meanwhile, Max learns that Cole merely wants to rent her unusual car for a film.

Preparing for her imagined comeback, Norma undergoes rigorous beauty treatments. Joe secretly works nights at Betty’s Paramount office, collaborating on an original screenplay. His moonlighting is found out by Max, who reveals that he was once a respected film director. He discovered Norma as a teenage girl, made her a star and was her first husband. After she divorced him, he found life without her unbearable and abandoned his career to become her servant.

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Although Betty is engaged to Artie, she and Joe fall in love. Norma discovers a manuscript with Joe’s and Betty’s names on it. She phones Betty and insinuates what sort of man Joe really is. Joe, overhearing, invites Betty to come see for herself. When she arrives, he pretends he is satisfied being a kept man, but after she tearfully leaves, he packs to return to his old Ohio newspaper job. He disregards Norma’s threat to kill herself and the gun she shows him to back it up. He bluntly tells her the public has forgotten her, there will be no comeback, and the fan letters are from Max. As Joe walks away, Norma shoots him three times. He falls into the pool.

The flashback ends. The house is filled with police and reporters. Norma, having lost touch with reality, believes the newsreel cameras are there to film Salome. Max and the police play along. Max sets up a scene for her and calls “Action!” As the cameras roll, Norma dramatically descends her grand staircase. She pauses and makes an impromptu speech about how happy she is to be making a film again, ending with: “All right, Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my close-up.”[5]

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Cast
William Holden as Joseph C. “Joe” Gillis
Gloria Swanson as Norma Desmond
Erich von Stroheim as Maximillian “Max” von Mayerling
Nancy Olson as Betty Schaefer
Fred Clark as Sheldrake, Paramount Producer
Lloyd Gough as Morino, Joe’s agent
Jack Webb as Arthur “Artie” Green
Franklyn Farnum as Undertaker
Larry J. Blake as Finance man #1
Charles Dayton as Finance man #2
As Themselves:

Cecil B. DeMille
Hedda Hopper
Buster Keaton (Bridge player)
Anna Q. Nilsson (Bridge player)
H. B. Warner (Bridge Player)
Ray Evans (Pianist at Artie’s party)
Jay Livingston (Pianist at Artie’s party)
Henry Wilcoxon as Actor (uncredited)

en.m Wikipedia.org

 

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 “People Are Funny: The Unlikely Job || a classic TV encore with Art Linkletter” 

​People Are Funny is an American radio and television game show, created by John Guedel that ran from 1942 to 1960 in which contestants were asked to carry out stunts.


Radio
The series began in 1938 when Guedel made an audition recording, and the following year, his concept of a comedy stunt show aired in Los Angeles as Pull Over, Neighbor, later reworked into All Aboard. Watching a bored, unreceptive audience listening to an after-dinner speaker, Guedel scribbled, “People are funny, aren’t they?” on a napkin, and he had his title.

In 1942, learning of a show that was canceled, he pitched People Are Funny to NBC, and it went on the air April 10, 1942 with Art Baker as host. In a popular first-season stunt, a man was assigned to register a trained seal at the Knickerbocker Hotel while explaining that the seal was his girlfriend.[1]


On October 1, 1943, Baker was replaced by Art Linkletter, who continued for the rest of the series. For a memorable stunt of 1945, Linkletter announced that $1,000 would go to the first person to find one of 12 plastic balls floating off California. Two years later, an Ennylageban Island[2] native claimed the prize.[1][3]

As the popularity of the program escalated, a movie musical titled People Are Funny was released in 1946, offering a fictional version of the show’s origin in a tale of rival radio producers. Phillip Reed appeared as Guedel, with Linkletter and Frances Langford portraying themselves. Also in the cast were Jack Haley, Helen Walker, Ozzie Nelson and Rudy Vallée. One outstanding moment in the film is a Spanish dance number performed by Lupe Mayorga (aka Lillian Molieri) to the song “I Love My Marimba.” The radio series moved to CBS from 1951 to 1954, returning to NBC from 1954 to 1960.[1]

Television 

Linkletter continued as host of the show during its run on television from September 19, 1954 to April 1, 1960. In one stunt, a contestant would win a prize if he could sustain a phone conversation with a puzzled stranger (picked at random from the phone directory) for several minutes without the other party hanging up. The series received Emmy nominations in 1955 and 1956. It finished #27 in the Nielsen ratings for the 1955-1956 season, then finished #21 for 1956-1957 and #29 for 1957-1958.[4]
Although the series ended on April 1, 1960, the network aired encores until April 13, 1961, making People Are Funny the first game show to air repeats. On March 24, 1984, a “reconstituted” version of People Are Funny with Flip Wilson as host returned to NBC where it was telecast until July 21.

 

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