RSS

Category Archives: westerns

Fury (1955-1960) tv series clip

Fury (1955-1960) tv series clip

Fury (retitled Brave Stallion in syndicated reruns) is an American western television series that aired on NBC from 1955 to 1960. It stars Peter Graves as Jim Newton, who operates the Broken Wheel Ranch in CaliforniaBobby Diamond as Jim’s adopted son, Joey Clark Newton, and William Fawcettas ranch hand Pete Wilkey. Roger Mobley co-starred in the two final seasons as Homer “Packy” Lambert, a friend of Joey’s.[1]

  The frequent introduction to the show depicts the beloved stallion running inside the corral and approaching the camera as the announcer reads: “FURY!..The story of a horse..and a boy who loves him.” Fury is the first American series produced originally by Television Programs of America and later by the British-based company ITC Entertainment.

Synopsis

The story begins with two young boys fighting on the street. As the winner of the exchange, Joey Clark, walks away, the loser attempts to throw something at him, but the object goes through a nearby window. The store owner quickly pins the blame on Joey, who has been labeled a troublemaker from past incidents. Rancher Jim Newton witnesses the incident and follows along as Joey is taken before the judge to clear the boy’s name. After learning that Joey is an orphan, Newton takes him home to his Broken Wheel Ranch and begins adoption procedures.

A typical plot involved a guest star who falls into mischief, was rebellious or disorderly, and got into trouble but is subsequently rescued by Fury. In most episodes, Fury allowed only Joey to ride him, but occasionally others were allowed the honor of mounting Fury if they had done a good deed for the horse. One of the original conceits of the show was that Fury remained a ‘wild’ (untamed) horse, who wouldn’t allow anyone but Joey to ride him or even come near him. In several episodes people would see the calm interaction between the horse “and the boy who loved him,” and assume that the horse must be broken — but when they tried to put a saddle on him, Fury would rear up and attack them!

Numerous episodes focus on youth organizations, including the Boy ScoutsBig BrothersJunior Achievement4-H ClubLittle League, and even the Girl Scouts. A 1957 episode is dedicated to Fire Prevention Week.[2]

Ann Robinson played Joey Newton’s dedicated teacher, Helen Watkins, in nine episodes of the first season.[3] In addition to Roger Mobley as Packy Lambert, another friend of Joey’s is portrayed in the series by child actor Jimmy Baird (born 1945), who was cast as Rodney “Pee Wee” Jenkins.[4]James Seay portrayed a sheriff in six episodes. Maudie Prickett was cast twice, once in the title role of “Aunt Harriet” (1958).

Among the other guest stars were Shelley Fabares as Midge Mallon in “The Tomboy” (1957), Tony Young in “Timber Walker” (1959), Lee Van Cleef as Race Collins in “House Guests” (1959), and Walter Maslow in “The Relay Station” (1959).

Jim Bannon appeared twice on Fury, once as a prison warden in the episode “Fish Story” (1958). Andy Clyde was cast in “Fury Runs to Win” (1956) and “Black Gold” (1959). Russ Conway was cast in “Joey Goes Hunting” (1955) and “A Present for Packy” (1960). Nan Lesliewas cast twice on Fury, as Stella Lambert in “The Model Plane” (1958) and as Packy’s mother in “The Pulling Contest” (1959). Paul Picerni of Untouchables fame,portrayed Tupelo in “Packy, the Lion Tamer” (1960). He also appeared in “An Old Indian Trick” (1959). John M. Pickard, star of the syndicated Boots and Saddles western series, appeared in the episodes “Timber” (1956) and “Trail Drive” (1959). Will Wright, known for his curmudgeonly roles, was cast in “Ghost Town” (1955) and “The Meanest Man” (1958).

Much of the outdoor footage was shot at the Iverson Movie Ranch in ChatsworthCalifornia, where the “Fury Set” was built specifically for the series. This set included a small house, a shed, corrals, and other features, but it was dominated by a large barn. The Fury Set was used in the films Fury at Showdown(1957) and The 30 Foot Bride of Candy Rock (1959) and the television series, Bonanza and Cimarron Strip, before it burned to the ground in the massive Newhall/Malibu fire of 1970.

Wikipedia.org

Advertisements
 
 

Tags: ,

WYATT EARP…. His life, Tv Series and Tombstone, the Movie

Wyatt Berry Stapp Earp (March 19, 1848 – January 13, 1929) was an American Old West gambler, a deputy sheriff in Pima County, and deputy town marshal in TombstoneArizona Territory, who took part in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, during which lawmen killed three outlaw cowboys. He is often regarded as the central figure in the shootout in Tombstone, although his brother Virgil was Tombstone city marshal and Deputy U.S. Marshal that day, and had far more experience as a sheriff, constable, marshal, and soldier in combat.

Earp lived a restless life. He was at different times a constablecity policemancounty sheriffDeputy U.S. Marshalteamsterbuffalo hunterbouncersaloon-keepergamblerbrothel keeperminer, and boxing referee. Earp spent his early life in Iowa. In 1870, Earp married his first wife, Urilla Sutherland Earp, who contracted typhoid fever and died shortly before their first child was to be born. During the next two years Earp was arrested for stealing a horse, escaped from jail, sued twice, and was arrested and fined three times during the course of 1872 for “keeping and being found in a house of ill-fame“. His third arrest was subject of a lengthy account in the “Daily Transcript” which referred to him as an “old offender” and nicknamed him the “Peoria Bummer”.[2]

By 1874 he had arrived in the cattle boomtown of WichitaKansas where his brother had opened a brothel. On April 21, 1875 he was appointed to the Wichita police force, and developed a solid reputation as a lawman. In April 1876 he was dismissed from his position as a lawman following an altercation with a political opponent of his boss which led to him being fined $30.[3] In 1876, he followed his brother James to Dodge City, Kansas, where he became an assistant city marshal. In winter 1878, he went to Texas to track down an outlaw and met John “Doc” Holliday, whom Earp later credited with saving his life.

Earp moved constantly throughout his life from one boomtown to another. He left Dodge City in 1879 and moved to Tombstone with his brothers James and Virgil, where a silver boom was underway. There, the Earps clashed with a loose federation of outlaws known as the Cowboys. Wyatt, Virgil, and their younger brother Morgan held various law enforcement positions that put them in conflict with Tom and Frank McLaury, and Ike and Billy Clanton, who threatened on several occasions to kill the Earps. The conflict escalated over the next year, culminating on October 26, 1881 in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, in which the Earps and Holliday killed three of the Cowboys. In the next five months, Virgil was ambushed and maimed, and Morgan was assassinated. Pursuing a vendetta, Wyatt, his brother Warren, Holliday, and others formed a federal posse that killed three of the Cowboys whom they thought responsible. Wyatt was never wounded in any of the gunfights in which he took part, unlike his brothers Virgil and James, or his friend, Doc Holliday, which only added to his mystique after his death.

Earp was a lifelong gambler and was always looking for a quick way to make money. After leaving Tombstone, Earp went to San Francisco where he reunited with Josephine Earp. She became his common-law wife. They joined a gold rush to Eagle City, Idaho, where they owned mining interests and a saloon. They left there to race horses and open a saloon during a real estate boom in San Diego, California. Back in San Francisco, Wyatt raced horses again, but his reputation suffered irreparably when he refereed the Fitzsimmons-Sharkey boxing match and called a foul that led many to believe that he fixed the fight. They moved briefly to Yuma, Arizona before joining the Nome Gold Rush in 1899. In partnership with Charlie Hoxie they opened a two storey saloon called The Dexter[4] and made an estimated $80,000[5] (about $2m in today’s money). Returning to the lower 48, they opened another saloon in Tonopah, Nevada, the site of a new gold find. In about 1911, Earp began working several mining claims in Vidal, California, retiring in the hot summers with Josephine to Los Angeles.

Wyatt Earp died on January 13, 1929.[6]He was known as a Western lawman, gunfighter, and boxing referee. He had a notorious reputation for both his handling of the Fitzsimmons-Sharkey fight and his role in the O.K. Corral gun fight. This only began to change after his death when an extremely flattering biography was published in 1931. It became a bestseller and created his reputation as a fearless lawman. Since then, Wyatt Earp has been the subject of and model for numerous films, TV shows, biographies, and works of fiction that have increased his notoriety. He did, however, live to see himself being portrayed in the film Wild Bill Hickok, released in 1923.[7] Long after his death, he has many devoted detractors and admirers. Earp’s modern-day reputation is that of the Old West’s “toughest and deadliest gunman of his day.” In modern times, Wyatt Earp has become synonymous with the stereotypical image of the Western lawman, and is a symbol of American frontier justice.

en.m.wikipedia.org

“WYATT EARP ORIGINAL TV SHOW” 

Kurt Russell portrays Wyatt Earp in the movie Tombstone

“TOMBSTONE MOVIE:  excerpt #5.  The OK Corral”

 
 

“Rawhide Season 4 Full Episodes”  

Rawhide is an American Western TV series starring Eric Fleming and Clint Eastwood. The show aired for eight seasons on the CBS network on Friday nights, from January 9, 1959[1] to September 3, 1965, before moving to Tuesday nights from September 14, 1965 until January 4, 1966, with a total of 217 black-and-white episodes. The series was produced and sometimes directed by Charles Marquis Warren, who also produced early episodes of Gunsmoke.

Spanning seven and a half years, Rawhide was the sixth-longest-running American television Western, exceeded only by eight years of Wagon Train, nine years of The Virginian, fourteen years of Bonanza, eighteen years of Death Valley Days, and twenty years of Gunsmoke.

SynopsisEdit

Eric Fleming as Gil Favor

Clint Eastwood as Rowdy Yates

Set in the 1860s, Rawhide portrays the challenges faced by the drovers of a cattle drive. Most episodes are introduced with a monologue by Gil Favor (portrayed by Eric Fleming), the trail boss. In a typical Rawhide story, the drovers come upon people on the trail and are drawn into solving whatever problem they present or confront. Sometimes, one or more of the crew venture into a nearby town and encounter some trouble from which they need to be rescued. Rowdy Yates (Clint Eastwood) was young and at times impetuous in the earliest episodes and Favor had to keep a tight rein on him. Favor was a savvy and strong leader who always played “square” with his fellow men – a tough customer who could handle the challenges and get the job done. (Producer Charles Warren called on the diary written in 1866 by trail boss George C. Duffield[2] to shape the character of Favor.)[3] Although Favor had the respect and loyalty of the men who worked for him, a few times, the people, including Yates, were insubordinate under him after working too hard or after receiving a tongue lashing. Favor had to fight at times and usually won. Some of the stories were obviously easier in production terms, but the peak form of the show was convincing and naturalistic, and sometimes brutal. Its situations could range from parched plains to anthrax, ghostly riders to wolvescattle raiding, bandits, murderers, and so forth. A problem on such drives was the constant need for water, and the scout spent much of his time looking for it, sometimes finding that water holes and even rivers had dried up. In some ways, the show was similar to the TV series Wagon Train, which had debuted on NBC on September 18, 1957.

Eric Fleming postcard

The series was not afraid to face tough issues. Robert Culp played an ex-soldier on the drive who had become dangerously addicted to morphine. Mexican drover Jesús faced racism at times (from people outside of the crew). Anger was still left over from the Civil War which had ended only four years earlier, and the “Poco Tiempo” episode reveals that Rowdy’s father’s name was Dan, that Rowdy came from Southwestern Texas, and that he went off to war at 16 (being later held in a Union prison camp). Trail boss Favor had been a Confederate captain in the war. “Incident on The Edge of Madness” in season one, guest-starring Lon Chaney Jr., had Favor’s old commanding officer attempting to enlist the aid of Favor and his men to start the “New Confederacy of Panama” much to Favor’s dismay; in this episode Favor and Nolan were revealed to have been in the Confederate forces up on Marye’s Heights at the Battle of Fredericksburg, and “felt shamed” at having to gun down so many Union soldiers. Some American Indians demanded cattle as payment for going through their land. Rough characters were in the shows, and in one episode, Gil Favor was tortured by having his face held near a fire. In another, “Incident of The Town in Terror”, people thought a sick Rowdy Yates had “the plague” (anthrax) and guns were used to enforce quarantine of the cattle drovers outside the town. Also, cattle rustlers were around, including Commancheros.

The show could on occasions be eerily atmospheric. “Incident With an The Executioner” featured a mysterious dark rider (Dan Duryea) seen on the hillside following the herd, “Incident of The Haunted Hills” featured a sacred Indian burial ground, “Incident of The Druid Curse” and season two’s “Incident of The Murder Steer” (where anyone sighting a rogue steer with “Murder” carved on its side soon after dies, based on an actual legend of the Old West), plus episodes with ghost towns, cattle with horns lit up by St. Elmo’s fire at dusk, with cowboys struck by lightning, plus a strange totally enclosed gypsy wagon, apparently steering itself, repeatedly turning up, all stand out as curiously “spooky” tales for a bustling dusty cattle drive; the show’s often stark incidental music suited these stories perfectly.

Margaret O’Brien and Clint Eastwood

In episode 67, “Incident Near the Promised Land” (most episode titles began with “Incident” until Bruce Geller and Bernard L. Kowalski became the producers for season six), the cattle drive finally reached Sedalia (for the first time in the series). Unusually, episode 68 continues on from that, where the cattle have been sold and the men celebrate in town and decide on their futures with even Favor thinking of leaving the business. Instead of the usual ending, wherein Gil Favor gives the command “Head ’em up! Move ’em out!” and the cattle move off, this episode had the end titles over a view of a Sedalia street. Episode 69 has Gil Favor visiting his two daughters, Gillian and Maggie, who live with their aunt Eleanor Bradley in Philadelphia. In episode 70, a number of the men are back together and heading back to San Antonio about 650 miles away, with a herd of horses (used in the titles) instead of cattle. Episode 71 has a new cattle drive ready to go, but the owner of 1600 of the cattle wants to be in charge, so Favor reluctantly signs on as a ramrod, but after problems, Favor becomes boss again at the end of the show. These five episodes made up one storyline instead of the usual single-episode stories which could have been set anywhere in the West.

Favor had many bad moments in the series, but none worse than the “Lost Herd” episode wherein, close to drive’s finish, he wants to beat another herd to town to get the best prices. He takes a narrow shortcut; there is thunder and lightning, and the herd stampedes over the cliffs, leaving him just 9 out of 3000 cattle when the drive reaches town. He does not have the money to pay the drovers off and has to face the owner (Royal Dano) whose cattle he has lost, knowing that he might never work in the business again.

From the second season, episodes began to feature individual cast members, notably Clint Eastwood’s Rowdy Yates (sole star in “Incident on The Day of The Dead” which opens season two); later, both Scout Pete Nolan (Sheb Wooley) and even cook G. W. Wishbone (Paul Brinegar) were featured as leads, while Eric Fleming’s Gil Favor remained in overall charge.

Pete Nolan (Wooley), the scout, departs as a regular cast member after “The Deserter’s Patrol” (season four, episode 18, 9 Feb 1962), but returns for a single episode “Reunion” (episode 26, 6 April 1962), and for a further nine episodes in season seven from “Texas Fever” (episode 18, 5 February 1965).

Charles H. Gray‘s character Clay Forester, having played a villain in three episodes of season four (from “The Inside Man”, episode 6), then reforms and replaces Nolan as scout from “The Greedy Town” (season four, episode 19). Gray remained in the regular cast for the rest of seasons four and five (though in a number of later episodes he is credited but not seen). Clay Forrester reappeared later in “Incident of El Toro” in season six (episode 26, 9 April 1964).

John Ireland and Raymond St. Jacques, 1965

Two other minor semiregular cast members were “Toothless” (William R. Thompkins) in seasons five and six, plus one season-seven appearance (sometimes uncredited), and “Yo Yo” (Paul Comi), who makes six appearances in season seven.

en.m.wikipedia.org

Rawhide Season 4 Full Episodes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLebWvRM0X2RjbjywTyaCPI-ZxL1TbWP5H

 

Tags:

Broken Arrow Western TV Series

image

Broken Arrow is a Western series which ran on ABC-TV in prime time from 1956 through 1958 on Tuesdays at 9 p.m. Eastern time. Repeat episodes were shown by ABC on Sunday afternoon during the 1959–60 season. Selected repeats were then shown once again in prime time (on Sunday evenings) during the summer of 1960.

Synopsis
Broken Arrow is a fictionalized account of the historical relationship between Indian agent Tom Jeffords, played by John Lupton, and the Chiricahua Apache chief Cochise, portrayed by Michael Ansara.

image

Anthony Caruso, John Lupton as Tom Jeffords and Michael Ansara as Cochise, 1957.

The series was based on the novel Blood Brother by Elliott Arnold, which was made into the movie Broken Arrow in 1950. The television pilot aired on May 1, 1956 on CBS’s The 20th Century-Fox Hour, with Lupton in the title role. The series, which began on September 25, 1956, was produced by TCF Television Productions, the TV division of 20th Century-Fox and was filmed at 20th Century-Fox Studios. The series was syndicated under the title Cochise.

Broken Arrow was one of the few westerns to portray Native Americans in a positive light, but Michael Ansara found the role unchallenging. Ansara told TV Guide magazine in a 1960 interview: “Cochise could do one of two things–stand with his arms folded, looking noble; or stand with arms at his sides, looking noble.”[1]

Tom Fadden (1895-1980) played the character Duffield in seventy episodes of the series. Early in his career, Sam Peckinpah was among the writers on the series.

In the second season opener, “White Man’s Magic” (October 1, 1957), Peter Hansen appears as Captain Farrell, whose fiance, Peggy, portrayed by Nan Leslie, is kidnapped in a stagecoach attack by Apache renegades led by Geronimo, portrayed in this segment by Ric Roman and later in film by Chuck Connors. Jeffords and Cochise succeed in freeing Peggy by making Geronimo think he is facing death from a bullet that has actually been successfully extracted from his body.[2]


en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
9 Comments

Posted by on February 27, 2017 in 1940s, 1950s, westerns

 

Tags:

Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok 

Andy Devine as Jingles

Genre Western

Directed by Wesley Barry

William Beaudine

Thomas Carr

Will Jason

Louis King

S. Roy Luby

Jean Yarbrough

Starring Guy Madison

Andy Devine

Country of origin United States

Original language(s) English

No. of seasons 8

No. of episodes 113

Production

Producer(s) William F. Broidy

Cinematography Henry Freulich

John J. Martin

William A. Sickner

Editor(s) Carl Pierson

S. Roy Luby

Running time 25 mins.

Production company(s) Newhall Productions, William F. Broidy Productions

Distributor Screen Gems (original)

Sony Pictures Television (current)

Release

Original network Syndication

CBS (1955-1958)

ABC (1957-1958)

Audio format Monaural

Original release April 15, 1951 – May 16, 1958

The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok is an American Western television series which ran for eight seasons from 1951 through 1958. The Screen Gems series began in syndication, but ran on CBS from 1955 through 1958, and, at the same time, on ABC from 1957 through 1958. The Kellogg’s cereal company was the show’s national sponsor. The series was also exported to Australia during the late-1950s.
Synopsis 
The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok starred Guy Madison as the legendary Old West lawman (in real life, also a gunfighter) United States Marshal James Butler “Wild Bill” Hickok, and Andy Devine as his comedy sidekick, Jingles P. Jones.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org

http://www.westernclippings.com/remember/wildbillhickok_doyouremember.shtml

“WILD BILL HICKOK (TV series) Wagon Wheel Trail”

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 27, 2017 in 1940s, 1950s, westerns

 

Tags:

 
%d bloggers like this: