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“Linda Scott – I’ve Told Every Little Star”

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Linda Scott (born Linda Joy Sampson, June 1, 1945 (New York City) [1]) is an American pop singer who was active from the late 1950s to the early 1970s. Her biggest hit was the 1961 million-selling single, “

I’ve Told Every Little Star

“[1] She went on to place twelve songs on the charts over the next four years, the last being “Who’s Been Sleeping In My Bed,” inspired by the film and written by the songwriting team of Hal David and Burt Bacharach.

Biography
Born in Queens, New York, Linda Sampson was 11 years old when she moved with her family to Teaneck, New Jersey. She was still in school (Teaneck High School) when she auditioned to appear on Arthur Godfrey’s hit CBS Radio show in 1959.[2] After having won a place on the show, Scott and other young performers became regular guests on the show. During the show’s run, the young singer came to the attention of Epic Records, and Scott made her recording debut (singing as Linda Sampson) with the single, “In-Between Teen”.[3]

Though still in high school, in 1961 she signed with Canadian-American Records, which had struck gold with the Santo & Johnny’s “Sleep Walk”. The label changed her performing name to Linda Scott, producing and releasing the hit “I’ve Told Every Little Star,” a standard written by Oscar Hammerstein II and Jerome Kern for their 1932 production Music In The Air.[4] The track sold over one million copies, earning Scott a gold disc.[1]

Scott’s three biggest hits came in that first year, with “I’ve Told Every Little Star” (U.S. #3), “I Don’t Know Why” (U.S. #12), and “Don’t Bet Money, Honey” (U.S. #9). The first two were standards, while the third was one of Scott’s own compositions.

Scott was the showcase artist when Canadian-American started a subsidiary label, Congress Records, in 1962, and in fact both labels released new material of hers simultaneously. The following year, she sang her hit “Yessirree” in the Chubby Checker vehicle, Don’t Knock the Twist. Scott’s final U.S. chart appearance was “Who’s Been Sleeping In My Bed,” released in January 1964, the same month that The Beatles made their first chart appearance. In 1965, she became a cast member of the TV rock show Where the Action Is, which she co-hosted with singer Steve Alaimo. Her last U.S. recording, “They Don’t Know You”, was released in 1967 on RCA Records. She continued to record as a backing vocalist (most notably on Lou Christie’s 1969 hit, “I’m Gonna Make You Mine”) before finally quitting show business in the early 1970s to pursue studies in theology.[citation needed]

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Coffee Song – Frank Sinatra

The Coffee Song” (occasionally subtitled “They’ve Got an Awful Lot of Coffee in Brazil“) is a novelty song written by Bob Hilliard and Dick Miles, first recorded by Frank Sinatra in 1946.

The song caricatures Brazil‘s coffee surplus, claiming (among other things) that no other beverages are available, and that a politician’s daughter was fined for drinking water. Snowclones on this phrase have been used in analyses of the coffee industry,[1][2][3] and of the Brazilian economy and culture.[4][5][6][7]

Sinatra re-recorded the song in 1960 for his inaugural Reprise release, Ring-a-Ding-Ding!

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Posted by on May 22, 2017 in nostalgic

 

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“Jennell Hawkins Moments To Remember”

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Jennell Ruth Hawkins (née Grimes, April 8, 1938 – October 13, 2006) was an American R&B and jazz singer and musician who recorded in the 1950s and early 1960s, and had a US Top 50 chart hit in 1961 with “Moments To Remember”.

Biography

Jennell “Jenny” Grimes was born in Los Angeles, and while at Jefferson High School formed a singing group, the Fidelitones, with friends Marc Gordon (later a successful songwriter and record producer), Ray Brewster, and Bill Piper. She also became acquainted with fellow pupil and aspiring songwriter Richard Berry, and in 1954 she and Berry recorded one of his songs, “Each Step”, with arranger Maxwell Davis, which was released on the Flair label, credited to Ricky and Jennell. She also played piano on “My Aching Heart” by the Flippers in 1955.[1] Although initially reluctant, as she saw herself as more of a pianist and organ player than a singer, she joined Berry’s backing group, the Dreamers, and sang lead on the Dreamers’ own 1957 single, “Since You’ve Been Gone.”[1][2] She married Lawrence Hawkins in 1956,[3] and around that time joined another vocal group, the Combonettes, who recorded three singles for the Combo label, including “Hi Diddle Diddle”.[1]

She made her first solo recordings in 1961, releasing “I Pity You Fool” on the Dynamic label before recording Richard Berry’s song “Moments To Remember” on the small Titanic label. The record became locally successful and, retitled ”

“Moments”, was reissued by the larger Amazon record label owned by DJ Rudy Harvey. The record rose to no.16 on the national Billboard R&B Chart, and no.50 on the pop chart. She followed it up in 1962 with a version of Barrett Strong’s hit “Money (That’s What I Want)”, co-written by Berry Gordy, which reached no.17 on the R&B chart.[4] She also released two albums on the Amazon label, The Many Moods of Jenny (1961), credited to the

Jennell Hawkins Quintet, and Moments To Remember (1962).[1][2]  However, Hawkins became disillusioned with Harvey’s business practices (he was later the victim of an unsolved murder), and she left the recording business soon afterwards to devote herself to her family and church. She later worked for funeral companies, driving a hearse and playing the organ at funerals. In the 1970s she re-emerged with a sextet to back Johnny Morisette on his jazz-funk recording of “I’m Hungry”. She also performed occasionally with her sextet in Los Angeles nightclubs, often appearing together with saxophonist Big Jay McNeely. In 2002, she reunited with the Dreamers to perform at a doo wop revival event.[1][2] She suffered a serious stroke in 2005, and died the following year at the age of 68, on the day she was due to receive a mayoral certificate to recognise her contributions to local music.[1][2]

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“The Fugitive (Season 4 Episode 28) – The Shattered Silence” 




The Fugitive is an American drama series created by Roy Huggins. It was produced by QM Productions and United Artists Television. It aired on ABC from 1963 to 1967. David Janssen starred as Richard Kimble, a physician who is falsely convicted of his wife’s murder and sentenced to receive the death penalty. En route to death row, Kimble’s train derails over a switch, allowing him to escape and begin a cross-country search for the real killer, a “one-armed man” (played by Bill Raisch). At the same time, Dr. Kimble is hounded by the authorities, most notably by Police Lieutenant Philip Gerard (Barry Morse).

The Fugitive aired for four seasons, and a total of 120 51-minute episodes were produced. The first three seasons were filmed in black and white; the final season was in color.[1]

The Fugitive was nominated for five Emmy Awards and won the Emmy for Outstanding Dramatic Series in 1966.[2]In 2002, it was ranked No. 36 on TV Guide’s 50 Greatest TV Shows of All TimeTV Guide named the one-armed man No. 5 in their 2013 list of The 60 Nastiest Villains of All Time.

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“Dark Passage” -1947 Humphrey Bogart”

“Dark Passage” -1947 Humphrey Bogart”


Delmer Daves

Produced by Jerry Wald

Screenplay by Delmer Daves

Story by David Goodis

Starring Humphrey Bogart

Lauren Bacall

Music by Franz Waxman

Cinematography Sidney Hickox

Edited by David Weisbart

Distributed by Warner Bros.

Release date

September 5, 1947 (US)

Running time

106 minutes

Country United States

Language English

Box office $3 million (US rentals)[1]

Dark Passage (1947) is a Warner Bros. film noir directed by Delmer Daves and starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall.[2][3] The film is based on the novel of the same name by David Goodis. It was the third of four films real-life couple Bacall and Bogart made together.[4]

The film is notable for employing cinematography that avoided showing the face of Bogart’s character, Vincent Parry, prior to the point in the story at which Vincent undergoes plastic surgery to change his appearance.
The majority of the pre-surgery scenes are shot from Vincent’s point of view. In those scenes shot from other perspectives, the camera is always positioned so that its field of view does not include his face. The story follows Vincent’s attempts to hide from the law and clear his name of murder.

PLOT

Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart in Dark Passage

Vincent Parry, a man convicted of killing his wife, has escaped from San Quentin prison by stowing away in a supply truck. He evades police and hitches a ride with a passing motorist named Baker. Parry’s odd clothes and a news report on the radio about an escaped convict make Baker suspicious. When questioned, Parry beats him unconscious. Irene Jansen, who had been painting nearby, picks up Parry and smuggles him past a police roadblock into San Francisco, offering him shelter in her apartment.

An acquaintance of Jansen, Madge, comes by Irene’s apartment. Parry, without opening the door, tells her to go away. Madge was a former romantic interest of Parry’s whom he had spurned. Out of spite she testified at his trial, providing a motive as to why he would have killed his wife. When she returns, Irene explains that she had followed Parry’s case with interest. Her own father had been falsely convicted of murder, and since then she has taken an interest in miscarriages of justice. She believes that Parry is innocent.

Parry leaves but is recognized by a cab driver, Sam. The man turns out to be sympathetic and gives Parry the name of a plastic surgeon who can change his appearance. Before the operation, Parry goes to the apartment of a friend, George Fellsinger, for help in proving his innocence and arranges to stay with him during the recuperation from surgery.

Dr. Coley performs the operation. Parry, unable to speak, his face wrapped in bandages, returns to George’s apartment only to find him murdered. He stumbles back to Irene’s house, collapsing at her doorstep. Irene nurses him back to health.

Madge and her ex-husband Bob, who is romantically interested in Irene, come by. Madge is worried that Parry will kill her for testifying against him and asks to stay with Irene for protection. Irene gets rid of Madge and deflects Bob by saying that she has already met someone to whom she is attracted, “Vincent Parry”. She feigns that she is lying, but actually she is telling the truth, as Parry hides in a bedroom. Bob takes Irene’s statement as a joke, but accepts that Irene is interested in another man.

As he recuperates, Parry learns that he is now wanted for the murder of his friend George, his fingerprints having been found on the murder weapon, George’s trumpet. After his bandages are removed, Parry reluctantly parts from Irene, declaring that she will be better off if she is not part of his life.

Parry decides to flee the city before trying to find out who really killed his wife. At a diner, an undercover policeman becomes suspicious because of Parry’s behavior. The policeman asks for identification, but Parry claims to have left it at his hotel. On the street, Parry darts in front of a moving car to escape.

At the hotel, Parry is surprised by Baker, who holds him at gunpoint. Baker has been following Parry since they first met. He now demands that Irene pay him $60,000 or he will turn Parry over to the law. Parry agrees, and Baker obliges him to drive the two of them to Irene’s apartment. Claiming to take a shortcut, Parry drives to a secluded spot underneath the Golden Gate Bridge. There he succeeds in disarming Baker and questions him, becoming convinced that Madge is behind the deaths of his wife and friend. The two men fight, and Baker falls to his death.

Parry goes to Madge’s apartment. Knowing that she doesn’t recognize him with his new face, he pretends to be a friend of Bob’s who is interested in courting her. Parry eventually reveals his true identity and accuses Madge of having killed both his wife and George. He shows her that he has all the evidence written down, and attempts to coerce her into making a confession. She points out that without her signature the accusations will then be worthless. While turning away from him, she accidentally falls through a window to her death.

Knowing he cannot prove his innocence, and that he will likely be accused of Madge’s murder as well, Parry has no choice but to flee. He intends to go to Mexico and then to South America. He phones Irene, revealing his plans; she says she will meet him there. The next time we see him, Parry is relaxing with a drink in a beach bar in Peru, when he sees Irene across the dance floor. They embrace.

 

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“Honey West – TV Series” 

“Honey West – TV Series” 

Featured Photo credit by loopy dave/deviantart


Honey West is an American crime drama television series that aired on ABC during the 1965–1966 television season. Based upon a series of novels that had launched in 1957, the series starred Anne Francis as female private detective Honey West and John Ericson as her partner, Sam Bolt.

As in the Burke’s Law episode introducing her, West has a partner and man-Friday, Sam Bolt (John Ericson), who communicates with Honey via a radio hidden in her lipstick case. In the television series, she keeps an exotic pet ocelot named Bruce. (In “The Fun-Fun Killer”, which originally aired on March 4, 1966, the African series Daktari is showing on Honey’s TV, and Honey asks, “Oh Bruce, why do we always have to watch your show?”)

Honey’s alluring feline qualities were reflected in her animal-print wardrobe and apartment decor. For sneaking around at night and engaging in energetic fight scenes, she wears a black fabric bodystocking reminiscent of Emma Peel’s leather jumpsuit. Like Peel’s Lotus Elan sports car, Honey’s similar-looking AC Cobra convertible emphasized her independence and vitality. Although the racy content of the novels was excised for television, West often went on solo undercover missions that required a provocative or revealing outfit.

She uses a number of James Bond-like gimmicks: a high-tech surveillance van, an exploding compact, a garter-belt gas mask, and tear-gas earrings. West is a black-belt in Judo, as is Sam, who is an ex-Marine.

Some episodes of this series, including the final one, were scripted by Richard Levinson and William Link, who would later be affiliated with such noted series as Columbo and Murder, She Wrote.

 

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 “Duke of Earl – Gene Chandler” 

 “Duke of Earl – Gene Chandler” 

Duke of Earl” is a 1962 US number-one song, originally by Gene Chandler. It is the best known of Chandler’s songs, and he subsequently dubbed himself ‘The Duke of Earl’. The song was penned by Chandler, Bernice Williams, and Earl Edwards. This song was a 2002 inductee into the Grammy Hall of Fame.[3] It has also been selected by The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as one of the 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.[4][5]
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Posted by on May 15, 2017 in nostalgic

 

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