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“DREAM A LITTLE DREAM OF ME – Doris Day … includes Rosemary Clooney, Joni James and Mama Cass Elliot versions”

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“Dream a Little Dream of Me” was recorded by Ozzie Nelson and his Orchestra, with vocal by Nelson, on February 16, 1931 for Brunswick Records. Two days later, Wayne King and His Orchestra, with vocal by Ernie Birchill, recorded the song for Victor Records. “Dream a Little Dream of Me” was also an early signature tune of Kate Smith. In the summer of 1950, seven recordings of “Dream a Little Dream of Me” were in release, with the versions by Frankie Laine and Jack Owens reaching the US Top 20 at respectively #18 and #14: the other versions were by Cathy Mastice, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Jordan, Vaughn Monroe, Dinah Shore and a duet version by Bing Crosby and Georgia Gibbs. Other traditional pop acts to record “Dream a Little Dream of Me” include Louis Armstrong, Barbara Carroll, Nat King Cole, Doris Day, Joni James, and Dean Martin.

The song was again recorded in 1968 by Mama Cass Elliot with The Mamas & the Papas, and then by Anita Harris. More than 40 other versions followed, including by the Mills Brothers, Sylvie Vartan, Henry Mancini, The Beautiful South, Anne Murray, Erasure, Michael Bublé, and Italian vocal group Blue Penguin (see below: List of recorded versions).

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10 Classic Commercials from the 80s and 90s

 

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April 2018 Beer Festival  – Texas Beer Spot

April 2018 Beer Festival  – Texas Beer Spot

Come out and join the fun on April 21 and April 22nd 2018 at the Sun City Craft Beer Festival. Over the past years the Sun City Craft Beer Festival has taken over …

Festival April 21-22nd

 
 

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“Thurston Harris Over And Over”

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Over and Over” is a song written by Robert James Byrd and recorded by him using the stage name Bobby Day. Day’s version entered the Billboard Top 100 in 1958, the same week a version of the same song by Thurston Harris entered the chart. Day’s version reached #41, and was the B-side to Rockin’ Robin.[1] Thurston Harris’ version peaked at #96. In the song, the singer describes going to a party with misgivings of having a good time, until he sees a pretty girl. The singer attempts to ask her out, but she is waiting for her date to arrive. He vows to try “over and over”.

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Posted by on April 18, 2018 in nostalgic

 

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“The Tune Weavers “Happy, Happy Birthday Baby””

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“Happy, Happy Birthday Baby

” is a 1957 song written by Margo Sylvia & Gilbert Lopez. “Happy, Happy Birthday Baby” was originally performed by The Tune Weavers, who had their only hit with this song. Both Margo Sylvia and Gilbert Lopez were members of

The Tune Weavers

. The single went to number four on the R&B chart and went to number five on the Hot 100.[1] The B-side of “Happy, Happy Birthday Baby, was The Tune Weavers version of “Ol’ Man River”

The inspiration for the song came from Margo’s then-boyfriend, Donald Clements, who was a member of a group called the Sophomores. When he broke up with her, Margo came up with the lyrics to express how she wanted to stay with him. “The words came so easily. It was real,” she recounted to Wayne Jancik in The Billboard Book of One-Hit Wonders. Margo and the rest of the Tune Weavers recorded it and “Ol’ Man River” in an 18-hour session on March 7, 1957, in Boston, with Margo eight months pregnant. Seven months later, the song reached its peak of popularity in the United States.[2]

Based on the similarities in melody, “Happy, Happy Birthday Baby” appears to have inspired two future Top 20 hits. I’m On The Outside (Looking In) by Little Anthony and the Imperials (#15 1964) appears inspired by the main tune of this song, and Wasted Days and Wasted Nights by Freddy Fender (#8 1975) appears inspired by the chorus of this song.

The track was originally released on the Casa Grande label. It was later re-released on the Checker label, but this later version omitted the final four saxophone notes (at the coda) which were part of the song’s signature.

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Posted by on April 18, 2018 in nostalgic

 

“The Everly Brothers – Bye Bye Love (1957)”

“The Everly Brothers – Bye Bye Love (1957)”

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“Bye Bye Love” is a popular song written by Felice and Boudleaux Bryant and published in 1957. It is best known in a debut recording by the Everly Brothers,[1] issued by Cadence Records as catalog number 1315. The song reached number 2 on the US Billboard Pop charts and number 1 on the Cash Box Best Selling Record charts. The Everly Brothers’ version also enjoyed major success as a country song, reaching number 1 in the spring of 1957.[2] The Everlys’ “Bye Bye Love” is ranked 210th on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time”.

The guitar intro to the song was not originally part of the song but was something that Don Everly had come up with that was just tacked on to the beginning.[3] Chet Atkins was the lead guitar player on the session.[4] Buddy Harmon was the drummer.[5]

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Gene McDaniels –  “A Hundred Pounds Of Clay” 

​”A Hundred Pounds Of Clay” is a song written by Kay Rogers, Luther Dixon, and Bob Elgin and performed by Gene McDaniels. The song reached #3 on the Billboard chart and #11 on the R&B chart in 1961.[1] The song appeared on his 1961 album 100 Lbs. Of Clay![2]
The song was produced by Snuff Garrett.[3] Earl Palmer played drums on the song.[4]

 
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Posted by on April 18, 2018 in 1950s, classic music, nostalgic

 

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